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Thread: Who studies Xing Yi Quan here?

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by doug maverick View Post
    . i havent seen my teacher in a few years as he took a really good job in brazil. so im still just training on my own.
    Just a quick question. If you don't mind me asking, what part of Brasil did your teacher go to?
    Last edited by Hardwork108; 04-03-2011 at 04:39 PM.

  2. #32
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    he works for an engineering firm in rio.

  3. #33
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    I practice Sun Lu Tang Hsing-i. Sun Lu Tang learned Hupei (Hubei) branch then added his theories and modified the sets so it is like a sub-branch of Hupei. The elements are fundamentally the same.

    You can see Jet Li doing Hsing-i, and Ba Gua while he is chains, in the movie The One.

    The new book Axe Hand; Hsing-i & Internal Strength Workout gives a good foundation in San Ti Stance, and the Five Elements. Aids independent study with moving adjustments that allow you too feel your own center, root and Qi, as well as test it.

    Energy cultivation with:
    Five move Tai Chi form,
    Standing Pole (Embrace the Moon or Hold the Ball)
    shifting the water and rising-expanding/sinking-contracting;
    Fore-arm Throw double set, dynamic drill, adjusting moving root,
    responsive blocking enabling the same move for offence and defense,
    center of Qi as it moves through oneself and
    the center between two people;
    Hsing-i San Ti: standing and moving for Qi and Fa Jing.

    Hsing I Five Elements detailed with step by step photos, Twelve Animals steps written descriptions.

    http://www.lulu.com/product/paperbac...rkout/15063347
    ****
    i met someone today who will start teaching xingyi in a month when they get back into town...any good links or references for someone to start scholarly studies on this style?

    thanks in advance!

  4. #34
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    wow im surprised to see so many good responses! us xing yi guys need to stick together.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaolin_allan View Post
    wow im surprised to see so many good responses! us xing yi guys need to stick together.
    thank you for the reference !!

    i have to say i am excited to have an opportunity to study this style. i will learn more about the lineage when the teacher returns to the states.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by shaolin_allan View Post
    what is TST xing yi?
    I've been told that TST Hsing-I is Hebei Hsing-I.
    TST stands for the organization that teaches it, Tang Shou Tao.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Punch.HeadButt View Post
    I've noticed that people usually compare Xing Yi and Wing Chun, usually commenting on "centerline strategy". I don't really get it. Offensive pressure on the centerline is hardly an uncommon trait. I don't know why parallels get drawn between any martial art and Wing Chun based purely on centerline strategy or use of a Sun fist. Note I'm not suggesting that you're basing your comparison on that, it's just a bit of a curiosity to me that your comment brought to mind. Admittedly, I have no experience in training in Wing Chun, so I may be missing some key element in the comparison.
    !
    I should have been a bit more specific. The style of wc i studied is leung ting lineage. They use a cat stance with most of the weight on the back foot. The san ti stance feels very similar to the stance I was taught in wing chun. The water element could easily have the lower arm being a bong sao with the upper hand being a hammer strike. The turning stance is also the same and/or similar to the pigeon toed stance in wing chun. When I said they seemed similar to me I actually wasnt referring to the use of the phoenix fist or the centerline theory, but I agree with what you said otherwise.

  8. #38
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    If you try to blend too many things you may confuse yourself and not do any one set of principles "properly" while learning.
    It is bias to think that the art of war is just for killing people. It is not to kill people, it is to kill evil. It is a strategem to give life to many people by killing the evil of one person.
    - Yagyū Munenori

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by doug maverick View Post
    he works for an engineering firm in rio.
    Thank you. Please check your PM.

  10. #40
    I should have been a bit more specific. The style of wc i studied is leung ting lineage. They use a cat stance with most of the weight on the back foot. The san ti stance feels very similar to the stance I was taught in wing chun. The water element could easily have the lower arm being a bong sao with the upper hand being a hammer strike. The turning stance is also the same and/or similar to the pigeon toed stance in wing chun. When I said they seemed similar to me I actually wasnt referring to the use of the phoenix fist or the centerline theory, but I agree with what you said otherwise.
    Fair enough, and again I didn't mean to imply that you were comparing them based on centerline strategies or fist-shapes. Just a comparison I see/hear often that I was reminded of (it mostly just makes me curious as to why it's always Wing Chun that is used for the comparison...maybe its popularity). For my own part, there are quite a few postures in Ba Gua, Xing Yi, and Sun Tai Chi where I've paused and thought to myself "this looks kind of Wing Chunny" based purely on shape. But again, I have no Wing Chun background, so I can't draw any comparisons beyond that.

  11. #41
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    I am no expert on wing Chun dev. But doesn't wc have base roots in shaolin. Scatterd in shaolin material u will see some similarities to wing Chun. I first noticed this after taste testing wc after study shaolin and again on practice and review of my material. Def wc has dev. Much in its evolution but there will always be the roots...shaolin tree is very broad so many of the offshoots have entertwining roots.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaolin_allan View Post
    Hello I was just curious to see who all the practicioners of xing yi quan here and what style of it you study under what lineage? Also what style did you come from or what drew you to xing yi? After the recent light now shining on Baji and it becoming seemingly more popular, it almost seems like xing yi is one of the lesser trained styles unless its along with bagua at the same school.
    Hebei style...kinda.

    Though my teacher spent time with Alan Pittman he was also heavily influenced by Yiquan and Lin Kong Jing - So, we pretty much spent most of our time standing and doing the 5 xing. I was taught most of the animals but now I only train one (Tiger).

    So, my Xingyi training now consists of a lot of San Ti, a very simple 5 Element form, and I throw in some work on Tiger xing pretty regularly.

  13. #43
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    punch headbutt i was just wondering what style(s) it is that you study? I do agree with what you said many people make simple comparisons between wc and xing yi based on the centerline theory when the truth is many kf styles attack on the centerline.

  14. #44
    punch headbutt i was just wondering what style(s) it is that you study? I do agree with what you said many people make simple comparisons between wc and xing yi based on the centerline theory when the truth is many kf styles attack on the centerline.
    Ba Gua, Xing Yi, and Sun Tai Chi lol. At least that's what I'm currently getting formal instruction in. Most of my own practice prior to coming under my current Sifu was basic stand-up stuff (boxing hands w/ elbows for good measure, basic kicking, rudimentary take-downs). My Sifu was a Hung Kuen/BSL guy for most of his life, and all my classmates have either Hung Kuen or BSL backgrounds, so I get decent exposure to viewpoints coming from those methods, too.

    I think the comparison is always drawn with WC because of a) its popularity and b) how obvious its centerline pressure is generally presented. It's just one of those little things I always notice when looking at Xing Yi clips and seeing the commentary on them.

    I am no expert on wing Chun dev. But doesn't wc have base roots in shaolin. Scatterd in shaolin material u will see some similarities to wing Chun. I first noticed this after taste testing wc after study shaolin and again on practice and review of my material. Def wc has dev. Much in its evolution but there will always be the roots...shaolin tree is very broad so many of the offshoots have entertwining roots.
    I agree. By my (limited) understanding, WC does have Shaolin roots so it's easy to appreciate similarities in shape popping up between movements of different styles. Actually, as Ba Gua has no Shaolin roots (at last not my lineage) and I'm still seeing such similarities I suppose it's just a body mechanics thing. We can only move so many ways, right?

  15. #45
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    hebei xingyquan here.

    guess there is more than you thought.

    i have a healthy amount of respect for the TST program. it is quite a full program and seems to do pretty well in systematically developing fighters. though i may be partial having learnt from the same source one generation removed.

    bill smith - yeah, the tang shou tao is hebei xingyi, but with a slight bagua twist some say. it all comes from hung i-hsiang, which is my grandteacher who developed the tang shou tao system of study.

    as far as i know, tang shou tao is more of hung's systematic teaching method more than it is an association - though i am not denying that it is an association. i have just seen it as more of his personal way of developing a well rounded fighter from beginner to advanced.

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