Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 64

Thread: chain punching till my arms fall off

  1. #46
    Here you go Kev. One of WSL top guys, Gary Lam, explaining all the things you're against. Not a big fan of his technique in the examples but he explains the basic concepts none the less

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BD8qor-yJ_A&feature=fvst
    Last edited by mvbrown21; 06-06-2011 at 10:32 PM.
    Matt
    ______________________

    www.youtube.com/mvbrown25

  2. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by mvbrown21 View Post
    I'm open to everything and if I'm ever in NYC I'll be sure to "test" it out so to speak. A structured "beimo" fight, right?

    Anyway, Is there a big difference between the Gary Lam line and the PB because here's an interview of one of his students and he says this about controlling -

    "Ernie: You’re dead on Kev. When I was first brought to Sifu Lams I was told that even though Gary was very skilled, I should watch out for all the hand chasing and extra actions (flowery hands). Since the WSL family guys originally taught me, the only Ving Tsun I knew was the WSL way, so I was very skeptical. The only problem was that Gary’s guys kept handing me my ass! Every time I tried to be direct and attack, I got smoked, tied up, pushed, pulled or just dropped. These guys had huge ground power and were very ballistic with there pak sau and lop sau.

    It took me a few years and a lot of humbling moments before I started to “get it”. It was about timing and distance and setting up opportunities. Gary sat me down and said, “you have a choice, you can either rush in with Lat Sau Jik Chung and be like a machine gun with small bullets spraying everywhere or you can place the target were you want, set up the line, and fire with full emotional content and body mechanics—more like a pump shot gun.”

    The latter requires a different focus and intent on the VT skill set. Once I let go of my preconceived notions I really started to improve. Now there is a time and a place were both strategies work best; sometimes your need a jab—something quick and instant—and sometimes a rear cross is the tool—something with full power and torque. I think a combination of approaches suit me best, and the old boxing saying, “lead with speed; finish with power.” This brings another quote from Sifu Lam, one I use very much in my life, “don’t be stubborn, when it’s time to change, then change!”
    "

    I like Gary Lam and I think he has a nice mixture of traditional WSL so to speak and the ideas and concepts of the other lineage's as well.

    Control or the "flowery hands, as you call it" is a very important part of WC Kev and to write it off because you, yourself, might not have been very good at it doesn't mean it doesn't work or complete the big picture
    Your confusing my idea of chi-sao flow'ers [ not flowers ] to this excerpt .
    I also have other things beside the dagger strikes, but that's the part most VT shares one hand helps the other.
    Maybe not as I train, but its easier to go forward hands on, let hands talk.
    typing isnt working

  3. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by k gledhill View Post
    Your confusing my idea of chi-sao flow'ers [ not flowers ] to this excerpt .
    I also have other things beside the dagger strikes, but that's the part most VT shares one hand helps the other.
    Maybe not as I train, but its easier to go forward hands on, let hands talk.
    typing isnt working
    Fair enough, and like I said if I'm ever in NYC, I'll drop by....conversation is now over....thanks for restraining yourself Kev
    Matt
    ______________________

    www.youtube.com/mvbrown25

  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by mvbrown21 View Post
    But you still didn't answer the Gary Lam method or the different angles of attack I mentioned earlier??
    we use angling extensively too....footwork.

    here is another guy who trains mit PB

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nbOp...eature=related
    Last edited by k gledhill; 06-07-2011 at 04:46 AM.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,655
    Quote Originally Posted by k gledhill View Post
    here is another guy who trains mit PB
    Looks like Philipp's German is rubbing off on you!

  6. #51
    Hah, hopefully some skills too....vu sao !

  7. #52
    One of WSL top guys, Gary Lam,


    GH

  8. #53
    Another clip with a little striking exchanges , note striking, not feeling chasing ...you can get a feeling that the chi-sao is kicking in directly with reflex exchanges but without 2 hands extended drilling ...and no lead leg eggbeaters chasing air.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duWnaCQW51g&NR=1

    and another , you can see striking development with stances etc...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL2r0...eature=related
    Last edited by k gledhill; 06-07-2011 at 09:33 PM.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lille, France
    Posts
    291
    I still think this is one of the best clips that illustrates the concept of controlling and striking simultaneously. Watch the use of angles combined with footwork to control/reduce the attacking and counterattacking abilities of the "opponent":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2US_ZXxLTGk

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    2,252
    Quote Originally Posted by k gledhill View Post
    Another clip with a little striking exchanges , note striking, not feeling chasing ...you can get a feeling that the chi-sao is kicking in directly with reflex exchanges but without 2 hands extended drilling ...and no lead leg eggbeaters chasing air.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duWnaCQW51g&NR=1

    and another , you can see striking development with stances etc...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL2r0...eature=related

    Liked the 1st clip

  11. #56

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,381
    Quote Originally Posted by k gledhill View Post
    thanks for the clips, any chance you have any clips of the guys actually hitting each other rather than just putting out ideas?

  13. #58

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,655
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean66 View Post
    I still think this is one of the best clips that illustrates the concept of controlling and striking simultaneously. Watch the use of angles combined with footwork to control/reduce the attacking and counterattacking abilities of the "opponent":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2US_ZXxLTGk
    I like this one a lot. I was wondering how white shirt (Michael?) kept getting black t-shirt(Kai?)'s flank. Paid closer attention and it was the slight turning of black t-shirt as he was attacking. Very nicely done.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario
    Posts
    2,164
    Quote Originally Posted by CFT View Post
    I like this one a lot. I was wondering how white shirt (Michael?) kept getting black t-shirt(Kai?)'s flank. Paid closer attention and it was the slight turning of black t-shirt as he was attacking. Very nicely done.
    It's a nice clip, Micheal is very tight in his movements, very hard to see the slight angles and structure/mechanics at play here.

    Now here is the the thing, Micheal (white shirt) is getting the flank of black shirt guy, who also has a VT frame and movement. VT frm/movmt is all about facing square while in training (chi sau/laap sau mode & range), so if Mike can get his flank how much easier will it be for him to get one's flank when they don't have this VT development?

    Like other's have said, part of what is learned in VT is to get the flank on your opponent, why do this? Because it's easier to fight one side at a time than two sides at time. VT teaches to fight with 2 live sides, the natural tendency in people is to turn when they hit, which is one side live the other dead (for the moment anyways).

    The conumdrum is can we get enough power in our strikes to do the job, without using a torque/twisting turning method to do so leaving us with one dead side when we hit. Well that is for each of us to develop if we know how.

    J

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •