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Thread: Bai Jiu (Moutai)

  1. #31
    no, ladies only. You have Canada citizenship so you can buy an Anhui farmer girl. You don't need to the penus.

  2. #32
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    oh god he's following me again.....
    I'm pretty sure the only thing tongs do nowadays is make sure Chinese restaurants don't pay out tips to their waiters. - Pazman[/B]

    https://scontent-b-pao.xx.fbcdn.net/...8a&oe=52848D36

  3. #33
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    ganbei!

    The Dragon is out of the bottle...
    Baijiu, World's Most Popular Liquor, Could Find International Market Outside China
    Reuters | Posted: 05/29/2013 7:37 am EDT
    By Pete Sweeney

    CHENGDU, China, May 29 (Reuters) - Chinese baijiu, a flammable, pungent white liquor averaging a 110-proof wallop, is the world's most consumed form of liquor thanks to its popularity in China, but for the first time distillers are looking to develop export markets.

    According to data from International Wine & Spirit Research, Chinese people drank over 11 billion litres of baijiu in 2012; the spirit, distilled from sorghum, wheat or rice, accounted for more than one-third of all spirits consumed in the world.

    But as a new generation of Chinese drinkers discovers the imported spirits that were unavailable to their parents, baijiu risks losing that market share unless it creates new markets overseas.

    "Baijiu hasn't been marketed to the West yet but I think it can be," said James Rice, managing director of Sichuan Swellfun Co Ltd, a baijiu maker in Chengdu, western China, in which London-based beverage multinational Diageo has taken a sizeable stake.

    "People are interested in China and here's a piece of Chinese culture that can go right to your dinner table."

    The opportunity has also attracted small entrepreneurs like David Zhou, who founded Washington-based Everest Distillery to import a Chinese baijiu and rebrand it for sale locally.

    "We really want to go for mainstream U.S. consumers and we do believe they can accept it."

    But Rice, and other distillers, have to deal with a major challenge: baijiu tends to make a terrible first impression.

    "I thought it tasted like paint-thinner and felt like a liquid lobotomy," said Michael Pareles, manager at the U.S. Meat Export Federation in Beijing. "However, like many other things in China, I eventually grew to like it."

    Torsten Stocker, head of Greater China consumer practice at Monitor Group in Hong Kong, was skeptical about prospects for overseas expansion.

    But he suggested the liquor could be better distributed to the swelling overseas Chinese community, which now depends on duty-free stores in airports to stay stocked.

    Baijiu's punch makes it a tough sell in Western bar culture where people drink on an empty stomach. So does its fuel-like odour and its aftertaste. But the history of alcoholic beverages shows that nearly any taste can be acquired.

    "Tequila has a very unusual flavour compared to more popular spirits," said Derek Sandhaus, industry consultant and author of a forthcoming book on baijiu appreciation.

    "But through clever marketing, good ****tails, and good management, it's earned a place on the bar shelf. I see no reason why the world's most popular spirit can't do the same."

    MAKING THE ADJUSTMENT

    But an adjustment is still probably necessary.

    Matt Trusch, a former China resident, founded a distillery called Byejoe USA that imports baijiu base from China, then re-filters it to make it more drinkable.

    "We've made it much more palatable to American tastes."

    Vinn Distilleries in Portland, Oregon, founded by a family of ethnic Chinese immigrants from Vietnam, is reproducing a generation-old baijiu recipe, and Vinn president Michelle Ly has marketed it - in very small volumes - to non-Chinese consumers.

    Curiously enough, she said a group of investors had approached her with an idea to export her U.S.-made baijiu back to China, advertising it as a product of high quality control - an issue domestic baijiu brands have struggled with.

    Baijiu expert Sandhaus thinks the best avenue for developing drinkers overseas is to follow the model of Japanese sake and market baijiu as the alcohol to drink with Chinese food. But he added that there is no need for distillers to rush.

    "It will still be a very long time before baijiu stops being a very lucrative business in China."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #34
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    byejoe

    That bottle design is painfully inaccurate for this.

    One Billion Drinkers Can Be Wrong
    China's most popular spirit is coming to the U.S. Here's why you shouldn't drink it.

    BY Isaac Stone Fish JULY 2, 2014 isaac.stonefish @isaacstonefish



    Imagine discomfort. It's 3 a.m., and you're sitting in the back row of a long-distance bus. The man sitting next to you scratches his whale-sized belly and giggles as he sleeps. The bathroom door keeps slamming open, and the smell of urine tinged with vomit wafts into your nostrils.

    Bottle that experience and you have baijiu, which literally means "white alcohol" and encompasses a variety of grain-based spirits produced mostly from sorghum and rice. Because it is China's swill of choice, representing an ungodly 99.5 percent of the spirits consumed there, it is the world's most widely consumed strong drink. Baijiu is a staple at Chinese state banquets, in high- and low-end restaurants across the country, and in convenience stores on the sides of dusty roads in one-chopstick towns throughout China's vast interior. Throughout my time in China -- both during my college summers in the early 2000s and while living there from 2006 to 2011 -- baijiu was a constant reminder that the enjoyable part of drinking was not the taste. In Red Sorghum, an early novel by Nobel Prize-winning novelist Mo Yan, workers at a distillery season baijiu with their urine. I don't see that as a metaphor, or as social criticism, or as a plot-building device. I see that as an accurate evocation of the flavor.



    Sensing a business opportunity -- due to growing curiosity over Chinese culture and the increasing number of Chinese visitors to the United States -- some companies are trying to bring baijiu to the United States. Diageo, the world's biggest spirits producer, has been pushing the high-end Chinese brand of which it is a majority owner, Shui Jing Fang ("Wellwater Workshop") to U.S. consumers over the last year. Some claim baijiu tastes "delicious, fruity and full of delicate complexity," states an article on the website of the Diageo Bar Academy, a company program that provides bartender training. The same article notes, however, that others call it "aggressive firewater" that "taste[s] of burnt tyres." (In the United States, Shui Jing Fang is almost only available for sale in the duty-free/duty-paid section of airports; a spokesperson for the company said it sees the opportunity to "deliver a truly authentic Chinese luxury product to Chinese diaspora and 'experience seekers'" in the United States.)

    But a small group of intrepid entrepreneurs has actually begun producing baijiu and selling it to American audiences. "It's such a brand-new concept -- no one knows about baijiu in America," said Michelle Ly, president of Vinn Distillery, a small family-run business based in Oregon and reportedly the only baijiu made entirely in the United States. In his March book, Baijiu: The Essential Guide to Chinese Spirits, writer Derek Sandhaus describes Vinn as featuring "touches of sticky rice and lemon curd." And there is Confucius Wisdom, a baijiu available in a few Washington, D.C., bars and one that, Sandhaus writes, "hopes to put forward the best face of Chinese culture, albeit in liquid form."

    Perhaps the most ambitious baijiu to try to crack the American market is byejoe, whose advertisements urge drinkers to "awaken your inner dragon." The company's founder and CEO, Matt Trusch, who worked in corporate finance at Merrill Lynch and spent 15 years living in Asia, said he makes the "cleanest and best baijiu" in the world.

    The company sent me its box of schwag: fortune cookies, a byejoe T-shirt, marketing materials, and two bottles decorated with an attractive Asian woman.
    How come I didn't get a schwag bag from byejoe?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  5. #35
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    continued from previous

    Byejoe's "Dragon Fire" flavor, infused with dragon fruit, lychee, and hot chili is passable. Sandhaus calls it "pretty approachable." And it follows the popularity of flavored spirits -- what industry types call the "flavorization" trend -- it has already started to show up in scattered restaurants across the United States. "We are looking for authentic Asian spirits, and there's not a whole hell of a lot available, so when byejoe became available we wanted to start offering it," said Kevin O'Rourke, the beverage manager at the upscale New York City Asian fusion restaurant Buddakan. The restaurant serves a Baijiu Longevity ****tail -- "byejoe Dragon, blood orange puree, lemon juice, bit of apricot brandy, dash of lychee liqueur" -- for $15; O'Rourke calls it one of the restaurant's better-selling ****tails.

    Byejoe's original, or "premium," flavor, however, punishes. "Every time I drink our baijiu, I'm surprised that it's so smooth," said Trusch. I was surprised too -- but in the way that you feel surprised when banging your head against a lamppost hurts less than expected. (But don't take my word for it; watch FP's baijiu taste test.)

    Byejoe's strategy is to Americanize the spirit -- the company emphasizes that the drink is low-calorie, gluten-free, even kosher. In its marketing materials, the company compares its brand with traditional baijiu -- its bottles are "tall, sleek & ultra modern," unlike the other stuff, whose bottles are "short, Chinesey." Confucius Wisdom, on the other hand, aims to entice Americans to Chinese drinking culture mostly as is: The bottle is festooned with the Chinese sage, and it's tag-lined "A Wise Man's Spirit."

    On a Thursday night in early May, Sandhaus and I went to dinner with David Zhou, the Beijing-born founder of Everest Spirits, the company that produces Confucius Wisdom. Zhou, an affable man in his early 40s, suggested we meet for dinner in Washington, D.C.'s Chinatown, at the first local restaurant to regularly serve baijiu ****tails. I'm 30 years old, but that night I felt like a freshman in college, guzzling the inane punch put in front of me solely for its alcohol content. It certainly wasn't for the taste. The baijito, the bai tai, and the lycheetini, were all burdened by a flavor that tasted like a mis-digested mash of pineapple and apricot.

    These entrepreneurs are certainly trying to warn people that baijiu is -- to put it politely -- an acquired taste. As Vinn Distillery's Ly admits, when people first smell her baijiu, "They say, 'Ooof!'" and then they say, "Oh, that's smooth and sweet." Ly pointed me to a January write-up of Vinn in the food magazine Bon Appétit, which said that though baijiu "happens to taste pretty terrible," Vinn is "more palatable" because it's distilled with rice instead of sorghum. "We always say, 'Don't smell it!'" said Ly, "because it'll kick you in the head."

    A recent blog post by ****tail writer Kara Newman asked, "Are Americans ready for baijiu, China's overproof firewater?" "No, they are not," wrote Newman, "But [baijiu] is coming for them anyway." Yes, baijiu is Chinese culture. But chicken feet as a bar snack, carrying around a dusty thermos of day-old tea, or the exposed-crotch pants that so many Chinese toddlers wear when they're potty training haven't caught on in the United States. I can't imagine baijiu will either.

    That's not to say all baijiu is awful. High-end Maotai, which Richard Nixon famously toasted with Mao Zedong in 1972, can sell for hundreds of dollars a bottle.

    I've never had very expensive baijiu, but I imagine it's drinkable. When I was in Beijing as a student in the summer of 2004, and in the years that followed, we would drink erguotou -- originally made in a distillery established during the Chinese civil war in the 1940s to produce antiseptics and sterilizers for the army. Literally "two pots distilled," it is now the low-end drink of choice for Beijingers and foreign hipsters alike. It comes in a green bottle that resembles the glass you'd find buried in a landfill, and mostly in two sizes, da er (big two) and xiao er (little two). ("Two" in Beijing slang means defective or retarded; after a few drinks, much unclever punning ensued.) Midrange products to me tasted pretty much the same, only they caused a more genteel hangover. I've never had the really low-end baijiu. Some supermarkets sell plastic bags of the stuff, so that the poor and the masochistically suicidal can stupefy themselves for under a dollar.

    Byejoe's Trusch told me that "it's a big mystery why a country with 5,000 years of history, and a superpower in the 21st century, doesn't have its representation at the mini-United Nations" -- by which he means a New York City bar. He's got a point; Americans are very internationalized in their hard-liquor tastes. In 2012, 42 percent of the spirits they drank were imported, compared with 23 percent for wine and just 13 percent for beer. Vodka, which probably originates from Eastern Europe, is the most popular spirit in the United States. There is a precedent, of sorts, for Asian beverages: Japan's sake and South Korea's soju, if not ubiquitous, are at least pretty easy to find in big cities across the United States. But they're much lower proof and much less alienating. "The person who encounters sake for the first time might not love it, but it's not as off-putting as baijiu," said O'Rourke.

    For baijiu to work in the United States, that off-putting pain has to be part of the charm. Baijiu could succeed if bars and drinkers embrace its grittiness and street cred. The Shanghai ****tail bar Yuan has served a rum, baijiu, ginger ale ****tail called the "Dark and Smoggy," an updated version of the classic concoction, with a play on China's polluted skies. Maybe that type of ****tail could build a following somewhere in the United States -- perhaps among American businessmen who play host to visiting Chinese. Perhaps byejoe's defanged Dragon Fire can find a spot for itself on bar backs across America. The best-case scenario is the thousands of American hipsters moving to and from China each year adopt a brand and pimp it to bartenders in Bushwick.

    But baijiu worked for me in China, and it was a cult drink of choice for many of the young hipster expats there, because of the drinking culture surrounding it. The suffering caused by drinking erguotou was a great bonding activity. Besides, painful obliteration in a foreign country makes for great stories. Like that time we bought several bottles of licorice-flavored baijiu served in squeeze bottles, drank it on the three-hour bus ride to an all-night rave on the Great Wall, made terrible mistakes, and then laughed about it as the sun rose the next morning.

    Even when the ugliness of Beijing overwhelmed -- the smog, the traffic, the dismal buildings festooned with blue bathroom tiles -- the camaraderie was always fun.

    Drinking baijiu without that is just unpleasant.
    All of the best baijiu I ever drank came out of mason jars.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #36
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    The best (white lightning) corn liquor I ever had (Winston/Salem) came out of mason jars.

  7. #37
    I had some really tasty baijiu in China. I'm starting to wonder if I should be afraid.

  8. #38
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    Baijiu goes good with Chinese food. Until normal Chinese cuisine catches on in the US, baijiu won't be successful.
    "I'm a highly ranked officer of his tong. HE is the Dragon Head. our BOSS. our LEADER. the Mountain Lord." - hskwarrior

  9. #39
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    If you've ever drank baijiu...

    ...this won't surprise you at all.

    Blacked out on baijiu, woman goes swimming in Hubei and wakes up 75km downstream in Jiangxi


    The lady who took 400 g of baijiu.

    A 57-year-old lady in Hubei province who threw back two bottles of baijiu passed out while attempting to swim in the Yangtze River and was rescued after drifting 75km across Huangshi city, Hubei province to Ruichang city, Jiangxi province.

    The woman, Shen Ailan, said she felt muddled as soon as she entered the water. She closed her eyes and drifted for 10 hours, according to reports, and when she came to, the sky had turned dark.


    Li Chunfu, the rescuer in Jiangxi.

    A Ruichang villager named Li Chunfu said he heard a voice calling for help. He quickly ran out of his house and jumped in to fetch the woman who was drifting towards the riverbank.

    Li warned Shen not to swim after drinking, as she likely won't be as lucky in the future.



    The 10-hour trip supposedly involved crossing a few raging torrents, but Shen survived safe and sound, which amazed tens of thousands of web users.

    By Lucy Liu
    Gene Ching
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  10. #40
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    fire

    Imagine that was quite a blaze...

    Truck carrying 3,000 bottles of baijiu bursts into flames



    A truck carrying more than 3,000 bottles of baijiu caught on fire on the G50 highway in Yichang last night, with the total value of the alcohol onboard costing more than 3,000,000 RMB.

    One of the tires caught fire first and the flame quickly spread to the whole truck, Xinhua News said. The local newspaper reported that it took firemen almost four hours to put out the fire. Fortunately, no one was physically hurt in the accident, but the loss will take a heavy toll on the owner's pockets.








    The driver told the local newspaper that all the baijiu was to be transported to Nanjing, “The two small fire extinguishers on the truck were too weak to put out the big fire. I could only watch the car burn in flames.”

    By Dina Li
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  11. #41
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    HEY! ish dat my wallet ober der Bai Jiu?
    I'm pretty sure the only thing tongs do nowadays is make sure Chinese restaurants don't pay out tips to their waiters. - Pazman[/B]

    https://scontent-b-pao.xx.fbcdn.net/...8a&oe=52848D36

  12. #42
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    here's a really stupid online game

    Shandong man chugs 3.5kg of baijiu in online drinking contest



    A video showing a young male from Jimo, Shandong province chugging down 3.5 kilograms of baijiu in just a few minutes went viral online this week. He's one of many boozers taking part in an online drinking contest that's been making waves on Chinese social media for the past few weeks, resulting in doctors warning participants to please, for the love of all that's good and holy, stop immediately.

    The contest began when a young male published a video of himself chugging 0.5 kilograms of baijiu in one gulp after he was late for a banquet. Soon enough, die-hard drinkers challenged to outdo him and started posting their own videos online. Currently, the record stands at 3.5 kilograms of baijiu, Sohu News reports.

    A doctor told Sohu News that drinking 1 to 1.5 kilograms of baijiu in such a short amount of time can lead to fatal consequences, “We suggest that people quit consuming alcohol and tobacco," the doctor was quoted as saying. "Wine is fine for your health, but no more than 100 grams of baijiu should be consumed per day.”

    Death caused by excessive drinking isn't an uncommon occurrence in China, where the ability to out-drink peers and colleagues is seen as respectable. In April, a government official in Guangxi died of alcohol poisoning after drinking too much during a lunch with colleagues on his first day of work. Last year, a Sichuan administer died after a school visit turned into a drinking party.

    Many netizens doubted the credibility of the videos and speculated that it could all be part of an ad campaign for a brand of baijiu, while others, naturally, expressed concern.

    "Even this much water would be hard to take in this short time, not to mention baijiu. Hope he’s fine,” online user 如果没有如果71599286 said.

    User 吉祥花语婚典 wrote: “Please love and treasure your life.”

    Watch the video below.

    By Dina Li
    follow the link for the vid
    Gene Ching
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  13. #43
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    ugh.

    I'll pass. Give me a nice smooth single malt whisky any day. lol
    That bai jiu (bu chiew) stuff is literally swill.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  14. #44
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    A candidate for a Chinese Darwin award

    Hubei man downs bottle of baijiu to quench thirst, passes out on roadside



    A man and soon-to-be legend out of Hubei province who decided that water just wasn't worth his money decided instead to relieve his thirst by chugging down a bottle of strong Chinese liquor, ultimately leading to him passing out on the side of a road.
    The 65-year-old man, surnamed Chen, is a pig farmer in the Wudang Mountains of northwestern Hubei, according to a China News report.
    On the afternoon of September 6, he set off to catch a bus to visit his family and decided to walk the six-kilometer stretch to the nearest station.
    About a half an hour into his trek under the scorching midday sun, Chen stopped to buy a bottle of water. He managed to find a small roadside shop but thought that the water and other drinks there were too expensive, so he opted instead for a decently priced bottle of baijiu, reasoning that it also contained water.
    Chen felt good after the first few sips, but as he continued to gulp down the liquor, he started feeling weak. Baking beneath the sun, his sight grew fuzzy and he eventually collapsed in a ditch on the side of the road.
    He was found at around 9:00 that evening by a random passerby who called the cops. Police arrived and propped up the man, who reeked of alcohol, and he explained what happened upon waking up.
    He was taken home by police, presumably after he missed his bus.
    This dude was 65. You'd think he'd know better. Silly pig farmer.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    The best (white lightning) corn liquor I ever had (Winston/Salem) came out of mason jars.
    Got mine from Georgia. Same jars. I can't drink the stuff. Even small amounts makes me overly aggressive and potentially violent. Booze in general used to do that to me but something about moonshine was just way worse. Thankfully booze no longer does that to me but I am not tempting it with that stuff ever again.

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