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Thread: Ronda Rousey

  1. #166
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    continued from previous

    AFTER ROUSEY LOST, many people began to revel in the idea that the woman who could kick everyone's ass in under a minute had gotten her comeuppance. Donald Trump tweeted that she was "not a nice person." 50 Cent posted a picture of her unconscious, then tried to blame it on his friend Floyd Mayweather before deleting it. Justin Bieber reposted one of the thousands of memes making fun of Rousey that went viral after the fight, then also deleted it. Lady Gaga-she of the raw meat dress and matching hat-posted a photo of Holm punching Rousey on Instagram and captioned it, "THAT'S WHAT YOU GET FOR NOT TOUCHING GLOVES!"

    ("It was just like a reaction," Rousey says about her decision not to touch gloves with Holm before the fight. "I was like, 'The last time I saw you [at the weigh-in], you were putting your fist on my chin and trying to get a cheap hit on me, then you turn around and you want to touch gloves? You have to be one way or the other. So if you want to be that way with me, that's the way it is.'")

    Fellow MMA fighter Cat Zingano was at Kalapaki Joe's bar on the Hawaiian island of Kauai when Rousey got knocked out. She should've been happy; Rousey beat her in 14 seconds when they fought in February. But then everyone started yelling "In your face!" and laughing as Rousey bled on the mat. "When I saw what people were saying to her, I was so disappointed in the fans and the sport. I immediately got protective of her," Zingano says. "It was pitiful how people were treating her. And I love all these armchair quarterbacks on etiquette. She didn't touch gloves? I've never touched gloves. I might give them some knuckles or whatever. But we're getting in a fistfight inside some fenced-in walls. You want there to be etiquette?"

    Take nothing away from Holm. She dominated the fight. But Holm is the first to tell you none of the spoils of victory she's basking in now would be possible without Rousey.

    "I have a lot of respect for her," Holm said after the fight. "I wouldn't be here and had this opportunity if it wasn't for what she has done. There are a lot of female fighters before her who paved the way, and all of that has built up to this. But she was definitely the biggest to really make a splash."

    This isn't really new. The fight game has long been a stage for athletes who became symbols of social change and objects of derision. William Nack wrote of Muhammad Ali after his loss to Joe Frazier in 1971, "For many viewers, Ali was still the mouth that poured, the renegade traitor and rabble-rouser whose uppity black ass needed dusting. For many others, of course, he symbolized all successful men of color who did not conform in a white man's world-and the hope that one, at least one, would overcome."

    History has been kind to Ali because he helped usher in the societal changes that needed to happen. He also beat Frazier the next two times they fought.

    How Rousey will be remembered largely depends on what she does next.

    "I guess it's all going to be determined by what happens in the rematch," she says. "Everything is going to be determined by that. Either I'll win and keep going or I won't and I'll be done with everything."

    SERENA WILLIAMS WAITED until the Friday after Thanksgiving to text. She sent Rousey her love and support and, most important, her understanding.

    They'd met for sushi one night in Los Angeles this fall, about a month after Williams lost her own shot at perfection and a grand slam-she was upset by Roberta Vinci at the U.S. Open, sending her into her own deep mourning period. A few weeks later, she issued a statement saying she was sitting out the rest of the season to heal from injuries, including the one to her heart. But out with Rousey, she was closer to her true self, and Rousey had found a kindred spirit.

    "I ****ing love her," Rousey says. "Everybody else is like, 'Oh, I'm small and proper and tennis-y' and she's just like, ****in' muscles, curvaceousness, awesomeness. She doesn't back down from anyone."

    I was always so sure that I could will my body to do anything that I wanted it to do. I wouldn't listen to it.”
    - Ronda Rousey


    It's easy, too easy maybe, to make the parallel between these two dominant athletes, each a win away from immortality (until the next match/fight). But Williams isn't carrying tennis on her back the way Rousey carries the UFC. "I call it juggling on a unicycle," Rousey says. During camp she's training twice a day for the fight and driving all over town to promote it. The questions are always the same. The interviews always take longer than they're supposed to. Someone says they just need five minutes of her time, it turns into 20.

    "I hate giving stock answers, it makes me nuts. I hate repeating myself," she said one fall afternoon while driving to Fox Studios to tape promos to be played during the next Sunday's NFL games. "That's a good thing bartending taught me."

    It takes 10 minutes to name all the bars in LA where she either worked or tried to work. It was 2008, after the Olympics. Rousey had no career, no home and no prospects. All she wanted to do was everything she'd missed out on by dedicating her life to judo. There was The Redwood in Downtown, Gladstones in Malibu, The Cork in Crenshaw. She'd see a post on Craigslist and apply. In between, she'd squeeze in shifts at an animal rehabilitation center and 24 Hour Fitness and give judo lessons for $50 an hour. She'd go into the bathroom at The Cork and take five-minute naps on the toilet. At one point she fell asleep at the wheel and crashed her car on the 405. There's still a small scar on her nose.

    "I was always so sure that I could will my body to do anything that I wanted it to do," she said, making her way through LA traffic. "I wouldn't listen to it."

    Twenty minutes ago, she was annoyed at her sparring partner for running behind and throwing off her schedule. She's going to be late for the Fox interview, which will make her late for the next interview, which might cut into any potential rest time before jiujitsu practice at the Gracie Academy in Torrance at night.

    But she used to live in this part of town. She knows a shortcut.

    "This used to be my exit!" she yells. "You get off on Motor, take a left and then a right and right. There's my pizza place. I love that pizza place!"

    She laughs as she cuts across three lanes of traffic to get off the 10.

    Beating the traffic and then outsmarting the traffic app turns her whole mood around.

    "Now you know how to go if you're ever stuck in traffic in this part of town," she says proudly.


    Rousey technically has .33 victories per bout minute, ranking her as UFC's most dangerous fighter across all divisions. Nick Laham

    JUSTIN FLORES TRIED to sit still in the plastic white chairs of the hospital emergency room. But it turned out an emergency room in Melbourne is just as awful as the ones back in the States. All you do is wait and pace, hoping for good news from the doctors, who come too rarely and never say enough.

    Flores has been coaching Rousey in judo since both were teenagers. She'd take Amtrak from Los Angeles to train with him at his father's dojo in north San Diego County. She'd come by herself and stay a few weeks. He was seven years older than Rousey, but she trained "like any other guy," Flores said. "We went hard. All of the time. It was like the never-ending round. The round would be over and she was like, 'Let's go again.'"

    He's seen her lose before. He knows what it looks like afterward. How much she hates it. How much it hurts her. After she lost in the 2005 World Championships in Egypt, he found 40 candy wrappers on the floor. There's always a binge and a purge. There's grief. Then there's anger.

    "In the heat of that moment, she'd keep fighting and fighting until there's blood and it was serious," he said. "I would have to slow things down and tell her, 'You're great, everything's OK.'"

    It's hard to wait for that part, even though he knows it's coming. So he paced the waiting room, replaying the fight over and over in his mind, trying to figure out how she lost so he could at least tell her something once she was out of the hospital.

    "There was so much pressure to, like, outdo the last performance, it's like, how can you even do that? It's kind of like, 'Just win!' You can't worry about doing the impossible all the time. Every time she does, it's like this new impossible thing, rather than being smart and tactical and picking your moments, react right, use your timing and your skill set."

    They had talked about doing different takedowns on Holm because she was taller than most of her previous opponents. Rousey would need leverage to bring her down. She'd have to set her feet differently and attack the legs and torso, not come over her shoulder.

    When they finally got to speak for a few minutes at the hospital, she mentioned that she didn't feel her legs were ever under her. She tried to stomp down on the mat as she entered the Octagon and just didn't feel strong. She was just off center, off kilter, off balance. Then she got hit in the face 30 seconds into the fight and never recovered.

    "Her fighting is like a microcosm of her life. She is able to adapt and improvise and come out on top," Flores said. "She's better on the fly rather than trying to do A, B, C, D, E, F, to Z and win. She's always been able to do it right then and there. In life, she's doing that too. She is real and truthful and she does it in a way where she always ends up on top."

    He's home in California now but still pacing the waiting room.
    continued next post
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  2. #167
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    continued from previous

    THE FIRST THING Maria Burns Ortiz did was cover her eyes. She's seen her sister lose fights before, but never like this. Never with a kick to the head that turned her body limp and sent her crashing to the canvas. Photographers always take pictures of the defeated fighter's family, reacting to their loved one's knockout. So yeah, her first thought was to cover her face.

    But her next one was to run into the Octagon and make sure Rousey had family around to stand next to her as she walked out. At the hospital, she told her sister she loved her just as much as she did before the fight. That losing this fight would never be OK, but she would be OK one day. Early the next morning, Burns Ortiz picked up her sister from the hospital and rode with her back to the hotel. Paparazzi had gathered outside, trying to snap a shot of the fallen champion. The UFC moved Rousey to a different hotel without anyone noticing. Eventually the Australian paparazzi moved on.

    Back home in Los Angeles, she's trying to help her sister do the same thing. The morning after Rousey got back from Texas, her sister and mother, AnnMaria De Mars, drove over to her house and made her let them in.

    "She just came over and crashed the front door with Mom," Rousey says, cracking a smile. "I think she thought she'd see me hissing in the dark with Adele on."

    Instead they sat on the couch and talked. Rousey played Mario Kart and Taichi Panda. They played with Mochi. De Mars dropped off a box of fan mail. Rousey is not ready to read anything nice yet, but she will eventually.

    "My mom keeps telling her to 'Woman up!'" Burns Ortiz says. Move on. Deal with it. Open the blinds.

    "It wasn't long before she was stopping by and telling me that I can't hide my whole life," Rousey says. "I have to do something with myself. Turn on my cellphone and stop ignoring everyone."

    On Thanksgiving, they all went to her sister Jennifer's new house. De Mars gave Rousey a disposable cellphone. She got her to take a family picture and posted it on Instagram. Rousey smiled.


    Rousey is a minus-160 favorite to win the inevitable rematch with Holm. Nick Laham

    "I've been in that situation myself, so maybe it makes it a little different for me than the average mom," says De Mars, a champion judoka in her day. "I came home empty-handed not once but twice. I hurt my knee and I was in the middle of getting divorced. It was horrible, horrible, horrible. I cried for days. Then I went and won the world championships six weeks later."

    Ronda's mom retired a long time ago, but she can still kick some ass. There are times the tough love seems too tough, but this has been their dynamic forever. "Well, both of us are definitely stubborn, and both of us definitely think we're right all the time," De Mars says.

    I always say you have to be willing to get your heart broken. That's just what f---ing happens when you try.”
    - Ronda Rousey


    Rousey's mother used to tell her that it is not enough to be better than everyone else, you have to be so much better that no one can deny your superiority. Her mom said it so many times, Rousey can channel her voice. It's an entire chapter of her autobiography. Champions have to find a way to win on their worst days.

    Before the fight, De Mars went public with her disdain for Rousey's longtime trainer Edmond Tarverdyan. She ripped him in an interview published right in the middle of training camp. She doesn't think he's teaching her the right things, in the right way. She thinks her daughter should play to her strengths as a judoka, rather than focus on striking. She wishes he'd push her harder, make her uncomfortable sometimes. She's troubled by his recent bankruptcy filing.

    "It wouldn't be the first time she disagreed with where I was training or what I was doing or who I was getting coached by," Rousey said a few weeks before the fight. "If anything it's almost like normal at this point for us to have disagreements about my training and coaches. We're both athletes. We both fought. I just have a different personality. The same things that work for her won't work for me."

    De Mars didn't fly to Australia for the fight.

    "I told Ronda I am not going to go because I love you more than winning," she says. "I did not think she was in the right place, and I couldn't pretend any longer that I thought she was."

    After the loss, her opinion hardened. She thought her daughter looked unprepared and fought the wrong fight.

    "People let her down," she says.

    Rousey isn't budging.

    "Of course I'm staying [with Tarverdyan]," Rousey says. "That's my mom's opinion, not mine."

    "WE DIDN'T CREATE this in one day, and it's not going to be taken away from us, from me, from her, from anybody in one day," Tarverdyan says. "Whatever happens in her career or in her life, we didn't do all this **** for it to be taken away from us. In life, things are going to be taken away from you. But we always believe in each other. We're strong next to each other. Being united and being strong helps you get through a lot in this world."

    Rousey's gym, in a traditionally Armenian section of Glendale, is full of male fighters. But she's at home here. During training sessions, she hangs on Tarverdyan's every word. When he speaks, she lets him finish before saying anything. When she first showed up to train at his gym in 2010, he ignored her. The life of a fighter is tough. You make nothing. You get hurt. Training is boring and awful, the fights are in Indian casino parking lots and dingy sportsman's lodges. Tarverdyan had to make sure she wanted that life bad enough. He'd tell her to hit the heavy bag for 20 rounds to teach her patience. She kept showing up, though. At the time, she was working three crappy jobs and making just enough to pay her rent and feed Mochi. Tarverdyan started ordering extra plates of food from his favorite Armenian restaurant in Glendale, Raffi's Place, to make sure she'd eat. "She'd ask why I ordered so much," Tarverdyan says. "I told her it was an Armenian thing."

    Then he saw her fight. It was at some wretched gym in the San Fernando Valley.

    "Boom, she was on. She jumps in there and finishes the girl," he says. "I'm like, 'She knows how to fight. She's born to fight. That's it, it's simple.'"

    Tarverdyan and De Mars both came by her house that first day after she drove home from Texas. Her mother told her to answer her phone and to woman up. Her trainer asked his mom to cook borscht and brought it to her.


    Rousey cuts weight in her hotel suite before her shocking loss at UFC 193. Nick Laham

    AUSTRALIA IS A wonderful country. The people are warm and friendly. The scenery is breathtaking. But nobody can seem to do anything about the flies. They're everywhere. There's no controlling them.

    Most Aussies learn to live with the pests. Tourists buy fly nets and insect repellent that doesn't really work. You can swat at them all you want, but they keep coming.

    "Every time they came and sat on your nose, you'd hit them because you were so annoyed," Tarverdyan says. "Same thing happened to Ronda. She was annoyed with everybody asking her all these same questions. She'd get upset, hang up the phone, get angry. She was just like, 'Enough of this bull****. Lemme beat this chick really quick, finish this fight and go eat my wings and relax. Tell everybody to leave me alone for a little bit.'"

    He's been a wreck since Holm kicked his fighter in the face. Why did she keep charging forward? Why didn't she slip Holm's left hand like they'd talked about? What happened to patience, patience, patience? That's all he kept telling her in camp. Wait for your moment. Don't chase down a counterpuncher. Move your head.

    It had to be the flies. The pressure. She couldn't just win, she had to please the crowd. She had to keep being perfect and invincible and all those other things that were exciting and scary and uncomfortable in a woman.

    But maybe she just got punched in the face? It's a fight. When you get hit hard and knocked out on your feet, whatever's inside you is expelled-fear, pride, guts, rage, love, courage. It all bleeds out fast.

    "She's not a point fighter. She's in there to go for it," Tarverdyan says. "You've got to connect your mind to your heart and then connect your heart to your balls. You need all three of those to be a great ****ing fighter, and Ronda has all three of those."
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  3. #168
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    continued from previous

    EVERY AMERICAN HEROINE should brace herself for the backlash. We want superwomen, but when we find them, it freaks us the hell out. So Angelina Jolie is a home wrecker. Hillary Clinton is calculating. Condoleezza Rice is cold. Serena Williams is too loud, too muscular, too black. Ronda Rousey is too arrogant, too aggressive, too emotional.

    Those criticisms have come and they will continue to come. Rousey doesn't need a man to fight her battles. She can kick anyone's ass. She makes her own money, more than even the male UFC fighters, and they don't complain because her star power makes them more money. She found a man she loves, and she wants to keep him.

    So she won't retire undefeated or take down the boys club with a single devastating armbar. But we often oversimplify the way history is written. There's no one person who changes everything.

    It's going to take awhile for Rousey to shake off this loss. She's still apologizing to everyone. Her face feels loose. Her dog whimpers every time she tries to talk about it.

    But she opened the door on the Friday after Thanksgiving and let people see her-all of her, even the messy parts.

    It's scary as hell for her to expose this much -- to be vulnerable when everyone thought she was invincible.

    But that's always been how Ronda Rousey fights.

    "I always think I can lose all of them," she says. "I'm the only one that's scared when I walk in there. I'm always ****ing scared."

    So will she fight again?

    "Of course. What else am I going to ****ing do?"


    Ramona Shelburne
    Shelburne is a senior writer for ESPN. She spent seven years at the Los Angeles Daily News.
    Can't count Ronda out yet. See the next post.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #169
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    SI Swimsuit sequel & SNL

    It's true! Ronda Rousey will appear in body paint in SI Swimsuit 2016
    BY SWIM DAILY STAFF

    Posted: Thu Jan. 7, 2016
    Remember when a little birdie mentioned that a certain MMA fighter, also known as one the most badass babes in the world, just might be appearing in SI Swimsuit 2016? Well, turns out the rumors are true!

    Back for her second year, Ronda Rousey will join an elite club of body-painted swimsuit models in the 2016 SI Swimsuit issue. Yep, you read that right. Ronda will wearing NOTHING BUT PAINT on the pages of our magazine next month.

    So what could be better? Well, as it turns out, the beach where we shot Ronda's gorgeous photos is public, so some eager paparazzi got a few early snaps. That means Christmas is coming again, folks! We're sharing a few BTS shots that are sure to tie you over until our official images of Ronda hit newsstands next month.


    Photo: MJ Day/SI

    [IMG]data-src="http://cdn-jpg.si.com/sites/default/files/images/ronda-rousey-bodypaint-bts3.jpg"[/IMG]
    Photo: MJ Day/SI

    And all we can say: SHE'S FLAWLESS.

    Swimsuit inspired by We Are Handsome.
    SWIM DAILY
    Ronda Rousey steps out of the Octagon to host Saturday Night Live


    Photo: Walter Iooss Jr./SI
    Ronda Rousey, SI Swimsuit 2015

    BY KELSEY HENDRIX
    Posted: Tue Jan. 5, 2016

    Ronda Rousey can now add one more feat to her growing resume: The Olympian, MMA star and SI Swimsuit model will take to the stage to host Saturday Night Live this month.

    The show took to Twitter to officially announce their January 2016 lineup, subsequently revealing that Ronda will join a star-studded cast to start off the year with a bang. Ronda is the first MMA fighter to ever host the show.

    Ronda is coming off a shocking loss to Holly Holm for the UFC women's bantamweight title and has largely remained out of the public eye since then. She made headlines last month for honoring her commitment to attend the Marine Corps Ball with Jarrod Haschert, admitting that if not for her word to be his date, she probably would've stayed "on her couch crying and eating ice cream for life another month."

    Ronda, who is no newbie to acting, is set to star in the upcoming Road House reboot, and previously appeared in Furious 7 and Entourage. She will be making her SNL debut with fellow first-timer Selena Gomez, who has been named the evening’s musical guest.

    See Ronda's episode when it airs on Jan. 23 at 11:30pm on NBC.
    She needs to make another movie, but this time with Gina Carano.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #170
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    Personally I hope that this loss, and it was a devastating one, taught her many valuable lessons ( as it should have) the most important being the lessons that ALL fighters must learn:
    There is always someone better.
    On any given day, ANYONE can get their bell rung.
    And because of those two:
    Be HUMBLE.

    She overexposed and overextend herself and it may be that she began to believe her own hype.
    Either way this lost can be the best thing that happened to her as a fighter AND a person.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  6. #171
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    This is for you sanjuro_ronin

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    She overexposed




    Wouldn't body paint just wash off at the beach?
    Gene Ching
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  7. #172
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    Eventually these ladies learn that it is good to leave things to the imagination...
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  8. #173
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    ~G
    That is foundation and makeup that made the beauty mark below her left eye seem to disappear.

    My guess is that her jaw is STILL sore. Even today.

    When you get rocked, even in your youth, it takes a while to get back to normal. 2 weeks just to start functioning again after a good and hearty beating.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #174
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    Snl host ronda rousey lets beck "the wreck" bennett try his noggin lock

    SNL HOST RONDA ROUSEY LETS BECK "THE WRECK" BENNETT TRY HIS NOGGIN LOCK
    Ronda Rousey hosts Saturday Night Live on January 23, 2016 with musical guest Selena Gomez. [Season 41, 2016]
    Totally gonna watch this
    Gene Ching
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  10. #175
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    SNL Host Ronda Rousey and Selena Gomez Call Boys with Cecily Strong

    Gene Ching
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  11. #176
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    I didn't make it to the end of the episode...

    I thought Ronda did okay, considering. It didn't feel like the SNL writers knew quite what to do with her. The Love Struck skit was amusing, but the whole episode was upstaged Palin Endorsement Cold Open:



    I got as far as the Teacher Trial and then bailed. If anyone watched to the end, was it worth finishing?
    Gene Ching
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  12. #177
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    Bud Light Superbowl ad

    Gene Ching
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  13. #178
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    SI Swimsuit Issue

    SWIMSUIT
    RONDA ROUSEY
    2016
    BODY PAINT











    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  14. #179
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    Continued from previous post







    Now why doesn't that body paint just wash off? Why? WHY?!?!
    Gene Ching
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  15. #180
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    There are few NSFW pics circulating that show a bit more than those, LOL !
    I wonder how one gets the job of spray painting the vagina of models?
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

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