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Thread: How much do you work on striking power

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    I asked you 1 question and you asks me back 2 questions.
    They were the original questions of the thread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennR View Post
    Fine, but the question was, HOW its increased and measured?
    Oh well, I answered what I wanted.
    Last edited by HumbleWCGuy; 09-02-2012 at 12:35 AM.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    I asked you 1 question and you asks me back 2 questions.

    If your opponent

    - move in, that's A + B > A.
    - stand still, that's A + 0 = A.
    - move back, that's A - B < A.

    I assume your opponent can hold body shield, standing still, and you try to knock him backward.
    IMO body sheilds are no measure of punching power. They're great if you want to measure how far you can push but good shots shouldn't move the opponent back they should drop where they stand.
    From my perspective developing and measuring power are two different things. Striking a wall bag or heavy bag focusing on striking in to the bag will develop power, repetition punching in air will also develop the mechanics and the speed that form a large part of the power generation but this is often dismissed, training the knives is also a good way of building power. Measuring power other than through the feedback you receive when you hit a bag or a training partner is difficult. Pads with sensors are available or you could try those silly arcade machines where you punch the speed ball. Another often frowned on method taken from other traditional arts is breaking of boards and bricks which can give an indication of power but nothing more. The best breaking test I've found is holding a board or boards with a thumb and finger and breaking it / them in a single strike. Personally I like the wall bag.
    A clever man learns from his mistakes but a truly wise man learns from the mistakes of others.


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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunIan View Post
    IMO body sheilds are no measure of punching power. They're great if you want to measure how far you can push
    A partner should be able to tell you the difference. You should be able to feel the difference when you are striking. Granted, a lot of people will push and call it a powerful strike, but you seem to know the difference so I doubt that you would make that mistake.

    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunIan View Post
    good shots shouldn't move the opponent back they should drop where they stand.
    I have noticed that when My power is "on" the bags behave in about the same way except that my motions get shorter and more compact. Bags, mitts, and people holding shields seem to get penetrated deeply, but ultimately they "jump" off the strike.









    Ultimately.... All that is just a clue to punching power, a K.O. count is the only way to know for sure.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by HumbleWCGuy View Post
    a K.O. count is the only way to know for sure.
    That's the sad part for the striking art. You just can't get the satisfaction out of your training. No matter how much time you have spent in front of your heavy bag, you will never know whether or not your punch will be able to knock down next person who stands in front of you.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 09-02-2012 at 11:52 AM.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    That's the sad part for the striking art. You just can't get the satisfaction out of your training. No matter how much time you have spent in front of your heavy bag, you will never know whether or not your punch will be able to knock down next person who stands in front of you.
    well you could try and punch him, then you know

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    That's the sad part for the striking art. You just can't get the satisfaction out of your training. No matter how much time you have spent in front of your heavy bag, you will never know whether or not your punch will be able to knock down next person who stands in front of you.
    It certainly limits the participation. LOL

  8. #23
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    Oneday when you spar with your opponent, you both throw punches at each other at the same time, when your punch almost hit your opponent's face, you pull your punch and try not to hurt your opponent. But your opponent doesn't stop his punch. Even your punch reach your opponent's face 1st, because your kindness, your opponent's late arrived punch knock you down. Your opponent just has a "lucky punch" on you. After that day, you try to knock down all your opponents on evey single punch that you throw. Pretty soon, nobody wants to spar with you. Without sparring partner, you quite your MA training soon after that.

    Situation like this will never happen to the grappling art. Either you take your opponent down, or your opponent takes you down. Either you are on top, or your opponent is on top. There will be no "lucky take down" that you don't deserve.

    A: How many guys have you knocked down today?
    B: 0.

    A: How many guys have you taken down today?
    B: 7.

    Which one will give you better satisfaction so you will smile in your dream that evening? There is a good reason that the grappling art is more fun to train than the striking art.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 09-03-2012 at 04:21 AM.

  9. #24
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    Developing power is not that hard to do, the problem is its largely a genetic trait and depends on your fast twitch distribution and alactic system, here is something I have posted before:

    Becoming more explosive comes down to two things. First, the nervous system must be developed to contract the maximum amount of muscle as rapidly as possible and the connective tissues must be trained to use elastic energy effectively. This will result in stronger, more explosive muscular contractions. Second, the energy producing properties of the neuromuscular system must be developed to fuel these explosive contractions using the alactic energy system to the maximum of its ability.

    The alactic energy system also known as the creatine system or the ATC-PC system, is the most powerful of the three energy systems though this also means it also has the shortest duration as well., so to properly train it you need to keep your sets short and allow full recovery. First strength levels and explosive strength must be increased, we do this by lifting heavy weights and striving to move them as quickly as possible Once we have increased our strength levels (always trying to move the weights as fast as possible) we then work on the CNS ability to respond using short sets with long rests using either indirect drills: sprints, squat jumps, bounds, box jumps, cleans, snatches throws, BW push ups, medicine ball passes and slams, or direct drills: hitting the pads, the bags, drilling takedowns or throws etc

    The key is very short sets, long rest periods to fully recover, and use correct technique at all times, we are working on speed/explosiveness NOT explosive endurance and the methods used need to reflect this

    This is how to build it, I measure it indirectly with vertical jump measurements, or even better long jumps, medicine ball throws for distance, directly you can measure it with hitting power meters etc but ive never done this

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    Oneday when you spar with your opponent, you both throw punches at each other at the same time, when your punch almost hit your opponent's face, you pull your punch and try not to hurt your opponent. But your opponent doesn't stop his punch. Even your punch reach your opponent's face 1st, because your kindness, your opponent's late arrived punch knock you down. Your opponent just has a "lucky punch" on you. After that day, you try to knock down all your opponents on evey single punch that you throw. Pretty soon, nobody wants to spar with you. Without sparring partner, you quite your MA training soon after that.

    Situation like this will never happen to the grappling art. Either you take your opponent down, or your opponent takes you down. Either you are on top, or your opponent is on top. There will be no "lucky take down" that you don't deserve.

    A: How many guys have you knocked down today?
    B: 0.

    A: How many guys have you taken down today?
    B: 7.

    Which one will give you better satisfaction so you will smile in your dream that evening? There is a good reason that the grappling art is more fun to train than the striking art.
    I feel for you if you need your ego massaging in that way. I don't need to KO people in training to smile about it, I just need to know that I did something well or that I am improving and learning. I smile when I see other people improving especially my students and I smile when I've pushed through a hard workout.
    A clever man learns from his mistakes but a truly wise man learns from the mistakes of others.


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  11. #26
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    In a real-world application of power punching. Speed, endurance, and accuracy training cannot be underestimated. All of these things translate into hitting a moving target flush or squarely. Every type of training is a tradeoff. I would say err on the side of speed, endurance, and accuracy versus max strength. One-shot power isn't that effective nor is anything that misses.

  12. #27
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    I will best explain this from a JKD perspective:

    For training the JKD's straight lead, I will focus first on proper mechanics and making sure I'm doing the technique right, practicing it slow at first and then building speed while maintaining my structure.

    For explosiveness, I will take a sheet of paper, holding it in both hands and then shooting my straight lead out as fast and powerfully as I can, the cleaner the rip of the paper the better.

    Next, I will take a very light dumbbell, 1-3lbs and practice as I did in the beginning, the light DB helps to develop a snap to the punch. It's important still to maintain structure.

    After that, I will move onto a heavybag, or if I have a partner focus mitts, and concentrate snapping the punch through the target. I tend to think about a 6" through but others say less, and some say more. I focus on maintaining my structure with this as well, and trying to keep up the explosive snap I worked on as well.

    Here's how one JKD group does it.

    There is also the hammer principle, an important aspect to the JKD straight lead.
    Last edited by Fa Xing; 09-03-2012 at 12:37 PM.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingchunIan View Post
    I just need to know that I did something well or that I am improving and learning.
    That's exactly my point.

    1. Did somthing well - If you can throw your opponent, you know that your throw is correct. If you can't, you know that your throw is wrong.

    2. Improving - If you can throw your opponent 5 times in a roll, you know that your are improving. If you can't, you know that you still need to train harder.

    3. Learning - If you can use a new throw on your opponent, you know that your are learning. If you still use your old throws over and over, you know that you are not learning anything new.

    We are talking about the same thing. If you replace "throw" by "knock down", the same logic will apply to the striking art as well.

    You smile in your dream not because you have knocked someone down, but because you "did something well", "improving", and "learning". I truly don't know any other meaningful method to "test" and "evaluate" your progress besides spar/wrestle. To collect applause from audience is just not my cup of tea.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 09-03-2012 at 02:23 PM.

  14. #29
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    That's not the hammer principle. It's a bil jee drill.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by HumbleWCGuy View Post
    That's not the hammer principle. It's a bil jee drill.
    It is, the hammer principle can be applied to the Biu jee as much as it can be applied to the Straight Lead.

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