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Thread: Fast Food Nastiness

  1. #271
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    Impossible Whopper

    I should try this. I've had Impossible Burgers before but it's been years since I've had a whopper. I actually gave up BK a few years before I gave up eating beef because it started giving me the runs after. Like immediately after. Like dash to the bathroom immediately. After a few episodes, I stopped eating there (but I was still eating beef at other fast food places).

    Burger King is rolling out meatless Impossible Whoppers nationwide
    Plant-based patties are coming to a BK near you
    By Dami Lee@dami_lee Apr 29, 2019, 12:39pm EDT


    Photo Illustration by Michael Thomas/Getty Images

    Burger King is rolling out the Impossible Whopper nationwide, after a successful trial run testing the meatless burger in St. Louis. The chain announced in a statement today that it plans to test in more markets before distributing the burger nationally by the end of this year.

    The Impossible Whopper is made with startup Impossible Foods’ plant-based patties, which are designed to look and taste like meat. The patties are also designed to “bleed,” just like the real thing, which can be attributed to the use of heme, a soy-based compound found in plants and meat. The burgers have 15 percent less fat and 90 percent less cholesterol than regular Whoppers, and Burger King’s taste test experiments claim that customers and employees can’t tell the difference.

    Meatless options are gaining popularity at more fast food restaurants. White Castle offers Impossible Burgers, which uses another meat-free patty recipe from Impossible Foods, and Carl’s Jr. sells a veggie burger made by Beyond Meat, a competitor to Impossible Foods.
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  2. #272
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    There's gotta be lawsuit potential here...

    Brooklyn Burger King Delivered Beef Whoppers to Customers Expecting ‘Impossible’
    One vegetarian ate two before realizing he wasn’t eating the popular fake meat, which won’t hit NYC outposts until later this year
    by Eater Staff Jun 6, 2019, 8:47am EDT


    The Impossible Whopper Impossible Foods [Official]

    A Brooklyn location of the fast food chain Burger King has been advertising that it sells the meat-free Impossible Whopper on Seamless — but instead sends customers regular old beef Whoppers without telling them. At least one vegetarian customer didn’t realize until after he’d already eaten two Whoppers, simply believing the ads boasting the two burgers taste the same.

    For at least the last few weeks, the 736 Broadway franchise of the burger chain featured the Impossible Whopper — “100% WHOPPER, 0% Beef” — on its menu, at one point listing it as its most popular item. But serving the burger here is actually impossible, since it’s only available in select cities. A 35-year-old Williamsburg resident, who asked to go unnamed to shield his eating habits, says he only found out when he went into the actual store at a later point to order the burger and was told they don’t sell it.

    “I was incredulous,” he says. “It’s maybe 20 percent poisoning. This is a city where there are a lot of reasons why people don’t eat [meat], from religion to health to ethics.”

    A manager at the Burger King tells Eater that when a customer orders it, they’ve been sending a classic beef Whopper in its place, asking the driver to inform people of the swap. But drivers have not told multiple customers who ordered the Impossible Whopper that it actually contained real meat, the customers tell Eater. The receipt on the bag also says “Impossible Whopper,” which led the Williamsburg man to believe it truly did contain the trendy plant product.


    The Burger King’s Seamless page advertising the Impossible Whopper

    The restaurant’s Seamless page removed the Impossible Whopper some time on Tuesday afternoon, after Eater sent an inquiry to Burger King corporate and to Grubhub, the Seamless parent company. A Burger King spokesperson chalked it up to a “technology error” from a franchisee.

    Other NYC locations of Burger King on Seamless did not list the Impossible Whopper; Burger King, Grubhub, and the franchise would not clarify how only one location had the error.

    “We apologize for any confusion this has caused. Any guests who ordered an Impossible Whopper through delivery in the New York area and have any questions may call 1-866-394-2493,” the Burger King statement says.

    It’s not known how many people ordered the Impossible Whopper; Burger King did not say. The item — which was listed at the top of the restaurant’s page — had been up since at least May 20.

    The Williamsburg customer had eaten Impossible product before at a different restaurant and thought it tasted “80 percent” like a true beef burger; when he tried the Whoppers, he thought the same thing.

    “Nope,” he says. “The Whopper is just ****tier than I remember.”

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  3. #273
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    The Marrot



    I realize this is one of those neurotic reaction things like Straight Pride or White Pride, and that it's a parody publicity stunt from Arby's, but if you're going to really make fake vegetables out of meat, they should attempt to taste like the vegetable. Plus it's cheating to use the actual vegetable as part of the ingredients. That's like dipping an impossible burger in meat drippings.
    This marrot will just taste like turkey dipped in carrots.

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  4. #274
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    Feast of Legends: A Tabletop RPG presented by Wendy’s

    Gene Ching
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  5. #275
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    the P.L.T.

    McDonald's Plant-Based Burger Trial Isn't a Slam Dunk, Analyst Suggests
    The P.L.T. has "not been a blowout success thus far," an analyst says. What does that mean for the future of plant-based burgers at McDonald's?
    By Mike Pomranz October 31, 2019


    MCDONALD'S

    Plant-based meats are arguably the biggest trend in fast food. And McDonald's is inarguably America's largest burger chain. So needless to say, the big question on many pundits' mind has been when is Ronald going to start selling a plant-based burger? It's a question that intensified this year when Burger King took its Impossible Whopper nationwide.

    Last month, McDonald's partnered with Impossible Foods' top rival, Beyond Meat, to begin a test run of a new plant-based burger called the P.L.T. But short of letting any U.S. customers try it, the company instead trialed the burger at 28 locations around Ontario, Canada. Perhaps testing a Beyond Burger in America would have created too much hoopla, and Canada, while not quite as far away as Finland, where McDonald's launched a different fake meat burger, is a bit of a buffer from the U.S. Or, then again, maybe McDonald's has no deadset intention of ever bringing this burger to the U.S. Though, since McDonald's and Beyond Meat are both American companies, that's kind of hard to swallow.

    Regardless, whatever McDonald's is planning with plant-based meat, a hiccup has apparently occurred: Yesterday, MarketWatch reported that sales of the P.L.T. aren't as strong as analysts had hoped. "A key question is whether McDonald's will partner with Beyond Meat in the U.S.," a Bernstein analyst was quoted as noting earlier this week. "Based on our channel checks with select McDonald's based in Ontario, Canada that are currently testing the Beyond P.L.T. burger, the initial feedback has been largely positive, although it seems that the trial has not been a blowout success thus far that justifies an immediate nationwide rollout across both Canada and the U.S."

    Of course, not "a blowout success thus far" certainly isn't a failure. One could argue that blowout successes like KFC's meatless fried chicken test in one single location only did so well simply because of a confluence of publicity and scarcity, and doesn't correlate to national demand. And we shouldn't rush past the "feedback has been largely positive" part either. Still, part of the appeal of plant-based options is the excitement that surrounds them: Avoiding a lukewarm rollout is likely one of the reasons McDonald's has been slow to jump into the plant-based business to begin with. If that's the case, this talk sounds like a bad omen.

    And yet, maybe this is just Canada being Canada. In July, the Canadian chain Tim Hortons added Beyond Meat items to its menus only to axe them by September. Meanwhile, in the U.S., Dunkin' also trialed a Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich in July and has just announced it is taking it nationwide. It could just be that Americans are more interested in plant-based beef than our neighbors to the north.

    I reached out to McDonald's for a reaction to MarketWatch's report and received a reply from CEO Steve Easterbrook via an emailed statement cautioning that the trial was still in its early days. Easterbrook also indicated that while the Ontario rollout is indeed a limited run, it's less about timidity to enter the plant-based market and more about literally testing how the P.L.T. would be implemented while getting a read on the "flexitarian customer."

    "We want to get the taste right, we want to get the marketing right, we want to get the operations right," he said. "So there's a number of important factors that we are learning quickly, and we think Ontario is a great spot, because it will give us a good read across North America frankly, but also into the developed markets in Europe as well [...] we think the read across will be beneficial and help us speed up our intelligence on this. So, more to come clearly, but it's an area of interest for sure."

    Despite being the most successful fast food restaurant on the planet, McDonald's has a history of adding products people don't want. (I'm old enough to remember the Arch Deluxe!) So today's McDonald's may be warier of a big plant-based burger rollout than its competitors. And though the company is a late entry into the fake meat market, its commitment to the test phase means we're probably less likely to see a quick Dunkin'-style turnaround and a more measured rollout. If the Canada trial does turn out to be a bust, McDonald's plant-based burger timeline might get even slower. Either way, it seems the "when will McDonald's add a plant-based burger?" questions won't be going away any time soon.

    UPDATE: Oct. 31, 2019: This article has been updated with a response provided by McDonald's.
    I tried an Impossible Whopper. I figured I should support this movement. I was all excited because I haven't had a whopper in like a decade plus. But man, they're still nasty. I remember when I used to eat beef that I had to give up on BK because it gave me the runs afterwards. The Impossible Whopper didn't affect me that way, but I felt like I ate too much salt and too much grease for the rest of the day.

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  6. #276
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    Kung Fu Donkey restaurants

    Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers sounds like a horrible porn flick.


    Chinese food has conquered the world. But are we ready for the donkey burger?

    Ben Westcott and Nanlin Fang, CNN • Updated 21st November 2019


    Donkey meat chain Fat Wang's signature dish -- a donkey burger with sauce and spring onions.

    Beijing (CNN) — From steamed dumplings to hot pot, traditional Chinese food has often proved hugely popular in the West. Now, Chinese restaurant owners are hoping they have found the next delicacy to crack the Western market -- donkey burgers.
    In Beijing, the unusual dish is undeniably popular.
    At lunch hour, diners pour into the brightly colored "Fat Wang's Donkey Burger" restaurant in the busy Beijing central district of Xicheng.
    Sitting at a counter with a group of friends, Beijing local Wang Li Min is tucking into the restaurant chain's signature donkey burger, which comes in a long, thin bun with spring onions.
    "In China, we have a saying," Wang says, between bites. "In heaven, there is dragon meat. On Earth, there is donkey meat."
    The meat tastes gamey and full of flavor, more like beef than chicken or pork.
    Originally a northern Chinese delicacy from Hebei province, the donkey-based snack has spread to major cities across the country. There are more than 20 Fat Wang's branches in Beijing alone.
    Just how popular donkey burgers are across the whole of China is debated. According to Sun Yu Jiang, a professor at the Qingdao Agricultural University, heavy demand is only really isolated to a few big provinces such as Hebei or Xinjiang.
    "Donkey meat is not the mainstream product of meat consumption," he says. "Most people in China are more likely to eat pigs, poultry, cattle and sheep."


    Donkeys, horses and mules are gathered for sale at a livestock trading market in Faku, northeastern China's Liaoning province on April 11, 2016.
    STR/AFP via Getty Images

    But Zhang Haitao, the official Hebei government-sanctioned representative of the donkey burger and founder of the Kung Fu Donkey restaurant chain, says demand is growing faster than supply. He even thinks it could go global.
    "When I was the president of the Hejian Donkey Burger Association (earlier this year), the market value of the donkey burger business was about 8 billion yuan per year," he says. That's around $1.1 billion.
    "But if the donkey meat market can improve, the industry's market value could be at least 100 billion yuan in the future," he adds.

    Emperors and trains
    There are different stories about how donkey meat became a popular delicacy in northern China.
    Wang Haibo, regional head of the Fat Wang's chain and nephew of the eponymous founder, says the legend of donkey meat goes back to the 1700s during the reign of the Qing dynasty's Qianlong Emperor.
    "When the emperor was traveling south, he stopped at Hejian Fang in Hebei province. He felt hungry at night and asked a eunuch if there was anything he could eat. The woman at the house he stayed at made him a pancake. Coincidentally, they had just killed a donkey and stewed its meat, so she put them together and gave it to the emperor," Wang says.


    Wang Haibo, regional head of Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers, with a sample of the store's signature products in Beijing in September.
    Ben Westcott/CNN

    According to Wang, the emperor was so impressed by his meal that he brought the recipe back to Beijing, from where it spread across the country.
    Another explanation is that Hebei province's many donkeys, previously used for freight transport, fell into disuse after the introduction of railways towards the end of the Qing Dynasty. No longer needing them for transport, locals found another use for their donkeys.
    But the government-sponsored expert, Zhang, says the story is very simple. Shortly after the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, farmers began to use donkey meat as food when they traveled for work.
    "Donkey meat was cheapest at that time. The donkey burger can be stored for several days before it gets sour," he says. Over time, according to Zhang, it spread to other nearby provinces and cities
    Whatever the reason, the dish has now become a major part of northeastern Chinese cuisine and is increasingly being used to attract tourists.
    Hebei province even hosted its first annual donkey burger festival in May 2017.
    "The demand for donkey is growing, but the market has shifted in recent years. It was a low-end market before, and now it has become a middle or high-end market," Zhang says.
    However, there are indications that instead of growing, the donkey meat market in China is actually shrinking.
    According to official Chinese government data, the number of donkeys being kept as livestock shrank almost 50% over the past 10 years to 2.53 million in 2018. In comparison, before the recent swine fever crisis, China had more than 420 million pigs.
    Qingdao professor Sun says the drop was probably partly due to the growing industrialization of transportation and agriculture. Also, raising donkeys is expensive and time-consuming.

    Fast food sensation?
    Originally from Hebei, Fat Wang's is one of China's largest donkey meat restaurant chains. Apart from their signature donkey burgers, they also are known for donkey meat hotpots.
    Regional head Wang is very particular about how to handle donkey meat. "It has to be from donkeys that are older than three years. If they are too young, the meat will be too soft to eat. If the meat is frozen it won't taste good," he says.
    Wang explains that it is their family's recipe for donkey burgers they use to this day. And now they want to share it with the world.
    "I am thinking about expanding outside of China," Wang says. "It's just that so far our management team can't follow the speed of expansion (domestically) ... But I think we can expand this to the Western world."


    One of about 20 outlets of the popular donkey meat chain Fat Wang's Donkey Burgers across Beijing.
    CNN/Ben Westcott

    Kung Fu Donkey's Zhang says there are already several people looking into opening branches overseas.
    "It has been called a model for 'Chinese fast food' ... The cooking procedure of donkey burger can be standardized like the hamburgers of McDonald's and KFC," he says, adding that he'd like to emulate the success of hot pot sensation Haidilao, which has hundreds of branches around the world.
    They might be fighting an uphill battle. A donkey burger restaurant which opened with much fanfare in the Australian city of Sydney in 2018 appears to have already closed permanently.
    Wang says he's relying on Chinese Americans to spread the word about the great taste of donkey meat and create a market for it in the United States.
    Whoever gets there first, Wang says he's happy to wait as he's not worried about his competition.
    "Their burgers will never taste like ours," he says.

    CNN's Maisy Mok and Yong Xiong contributed to this article.
    THREADS
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  7. #277
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    wth prc?

    McDonald’s China Releases Limited-Time Spam Oreo Burger
    BY BRYAN KE
    DECEMBER 21, 2020
    2 MINUTE READ

    McDonald’s China has released a limited-time Spam Oreo burger for the holidays.

    Although it sounds like an early April Fools’ joke, the company first teased the existence of the new Spam Oreo burger on Dec. 15 on Weibo, according to Delish.


    Image screenshot via Weibo
    The Spam Oreo burger will be available starting Dec. 21 for 13.14 Chinese yuan ($2). McDonald’s China will only make 400,000 of the burgers. The sandwich will come with two slices of Spam slathered with mayo and drizzled with Oreo crumbs.

    I can't even make those flavors go together in my head. Sounds like a stoner munchy fix.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #278
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    BTS meals?

    I can't even...

    BTS and McDonald’s Collab Brings New South Korean-Inspired Sauces to ARMY in 50 Countries

    BY KIMBERLY NGUYEN
    APRIL 19, 2021
    2 MINUTE READ

    The BTS ARMY has something new to look forward to next month as the South Korean supergroup collaborates with McDonald’s on a signature order.

    The BTS-approved meal will include a 10-piece Chicken McNuggets, medium fries and a medium Coke, according to a press release.

    The meal, available on May 26, will also come with two new sauces inspired by the menu found at McDonald’s branches in South Korea: sweet chili and cajun.

    The South Korean boy band shared great experiences with the fast-food company, their label BIGHIT MUSIC shared.

    “We’re excited about this collaboration and can’t wait to share the BTS Meal with the world,” the label said.

    The BTS meal follows McDonald’s previous partnerships with Travis Scott and J Balvin last year, as part of the fast-food chain’s Famous Orders program. It is the first celebrity collaboration from the program to become available in nearly 50 countries.

    “BTS truly lights up the world stage, uniting people across the globe through their music. We’re excited to bring customers even closer to their beloved band in a way only McDonald’s can – through our delicious food – when we introduce the BTS signature order on our menu next month,” McDonald’s USA CMO Morgan Flatley said.

    Last month the seven-member group, which was named Time Magazine “Entertainer of the Year” in 2020, released a statement on social media, condemning anti-Asian hate.

    “We recall moments when we faced discrimination as Asians,” they wrote. “We have endured expletives without reason and were mocked for the way we look.”

    “We stand against racial discrimination. We condemn violence. You, I and we all have the right to be respected. We will stand together.”

    Feature Images via Getty
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  9. #279
    I really like McDonald's Cheeseburger. One of my favorite food to buy in a fast-food chain.

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