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Thread: Hua Quan 華拳 Question

  1. #1
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    Hua Quan 華拳 Question

    It is my understanding that 'Hua' can refer to "Flowery Fist", Hua (the Mountain Range) as well has being a term for China in general.

    So, how can one distinguish between somebody using "Hua Quan" and meaning a general term for "Chinese Fist" or referring specifically to Hua Quan the northern Longfist style? Or am i mistaken and Hua Quan is never used as a general/generic term for Chinese Fist?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huaquan

    Thanks!

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    Hua Quan

    Hi- I am a student training in the Hua Quan longfist style. As I understand it, saying Hua Quan "China Fist" as a generic term for Chinese martial arts and also being a specific style is BOTH correct. Which is why it's a bit confusing. Usually, when referring to Hua Quan with the Chinese characters you wrote, then one is referring to a specific style- "Hua Quan- Glorious/Splendorous (synonymous with the word Chinese) Fist, aka the fist of Hua Mountain (its perceived general place of origin), aka "Kung Fu of Essence," this is the style referred to that was practiced in Shandong Province by the Cai family for countless generations. So the traditional system is also an old family style. Grandmaster Cai Long Yun is a famous martial artist of this style, and Vice-chairman of the Chinese Wushu Assoc.
    The first written records of the Cai family in connection w/ the Hua Quan style was from the Tang Dynasty (7th, 8th century AD), and some are inclined to believe the style is still older than that. So think about it. That makes the style, in whatever original form it was in (said to have 48 hand sets) older than most styles today. And this is true with the rest of the Northern Longfist family. In fact, it makes it older than Emperor's Longfist (10th century- 1st Song Emperor)- which was probably just the emperor's personal boxing routines based on other systems of longfist boxing, etc. (much like what the Chen family of Cenjiagou did w/ their art.) Therefore, one can view Hua Quan (with the charecters you wrote) as an old, historical classical Chinese system. It is said that the Longfist family is like a mother to all other Chinese martial arts- Tai Chi Quan came later. The animal styles came later. Styles like Baji-quan, Fanzhi-quan, Crane style, that specialize in different methods/ ways of issuing power came later- but usually all this can be found within longfist- that's why some think longfist is generic, but when mastered can be VERY high level. Heck, even a style like Wing Chun was modified from other systems, etc. These techniques can be found in longfist too, if one has a mind for it. It may not be over-emphasized in the training, but it's there. With a foundation in longfist I hear its easier to pick up other styles. So that's why, to my understanding, Hua Quan is referred to as China fist- it is an older style, a lot of the time modified and absorbed into other styles over the centuries (like say, Shandong Praying Mantis) which is one reason the specific Hua Quan style is kinda rare. So people usually refer to their kung fu as specific styles, but when you go back in history, the vast, broad curriculum of the Hua Quan system and styles like it are like a mother to these other arts. It is kung fu of essence... This is how I understand it thru listening to my teachers, and through my own personal research. Hope that makes it at least a bit clearer.
    -Matt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TopCrusader View Post
    Hua (the Mountain Range)
    I don't think the Hua mountain at the west side of China has anything to do with the longfist Hua branch. I had visited that mountain. I didn't see anybody trained that style there.

    Besides 花(flower), Hua also mean 滑(smooth). It's one of the 5 major branches of the longfist system.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 06-14-2013 at 01:24 PM.
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  4. #4
    all the hua quan are the same system. they have different writing because of illiteracy.

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    Hua is one of the big 5 northern styles.

    the others being: Fa, Pao, Cha and Hong
    Last edited by David Jamieson; 06-14-2013 at 07:05 AM.
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post

    I don't think the Hua mountain at the west side of China has anything to do with the longfist Hua branch. I had visited that mountain. I didn't see anybody trained that style there.
    Unfortunately, we have in TCMA too many systems who get stuff attached to them that NEVER were originally attached to them... to get "rep" or credibility or to seem more "cool" people said their systems were from old monks, monasteries, different regions, etc

    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    all the hua quan are the same system. they have different writing because of illiteracy.
    The problem with illiteracy and "white characters" is a HUGE ONE in TCMA
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    Hua is one of the big 5 northern styles.

    the others being: Fa, Pao, Cha and Hong
    I believe Fa should be Tan (Tan Tui).
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    MarathonTmatt,
    Thankyou for the lengthy response!

    Would you consider Hua Quan a Northern Shaolin style?

  9. #9
    Greetings MarathonTmatt and welcome to the forum,

    Would you please clarify something for me?

    I read somewhere on the net that it was not Chao Lien Ho who introduced the 12 line Tan Tui to the Ching Wu curriculum. It was the father of Cai Long Yun. Is this true?

    If so, do you maintain the stomping and shouting methods?


    mickey

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    Quote Originally Posted by lkfmdc View Post
    The problem with illiteracy and "white characters" is a HUGE ONE in TCMA
    What are "white characters"? Thank you!
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooyingmantis View Post
    What are "white characters"? Thank you!
    I'm going to guess it refers to Chinese characters with different meanings, that might be incorrectly substituted for others that sound the same/similar(?).
    Last edited by Jimbo; 06-16-2013 at 04:23 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lkfmdc View Post
    Unfortunately, we have in TCMA too many systems who get stuff attached to them that NEVER were originally attached to them... to get "rep" or credibility or to seem more "cool" people said their systems were from old monks, monasteries, different regions, etc
    Good point! In reading the history of the style it said the boxing techniques were compiled and collected from the general region of Hua Shan itself (not particularly from the mountain) and spread out from there- and the Cai family had an ancestor from this area- but who knows that could just be legend. What we can say for sure is that the system itself comes from the Cai family, from Shandong province. The flavor of the style is very much like other Shandong longfist styles- when I see certain Cha Quan routines I think "wow looks stylistically similar to Hua Quan".

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    Quote Originally Posted by TopCrusader View Post
    MarathonTmatt,
    Thankyou for the lengthy response!

    Would you consider Hua Quan a Northern Shaolin style?
    It is most definitely a northern style. I know there is a specific style that calls itself "Northern Shaolin" which is not the same style (or lineage) per se but similar in technique, form, etc.
    There are a few basic sets of forms originally from the Hua Quan style that is practiced by modern Shaolin practitioners- such as "Babu Quan" aka called "Babu Lian Hua(n)" by people who train the form who aren't necessarily Hua Quan practitioners- you can see Hua is in the name "Babu Lian Hua", meaning, "this comes from the Hua system." Also the Hua form "Sher Ba Quan" was adopted into the Lohan 18 Hand sets.
    I also believe if I'm not mistaken that the core training of the Shaolin temple was originally LongFist, later replaced by other styles.
    I also heard Hua Quan was Taoist in origin- it definitely emphasizes fluid movements, not having to be "hard" all the time- sort of a grey area or in the middle of soft training methods like Tai Ji Quan and harder training methods like a Buddhist style- but this is a trademark of northern styles in general.
    So Hua Quan is definitely inter-related to other Chinese martial arts. I personally wouldn't call it Shaolin, although it could share historical influences with Shaolin (as we see from Babu Lian Huan & Sher Ba Quan) and other arts (longfist).

  14. #14
    hua quan is just hong quan. arabs cant pronounce "ong", and some Chinese dialects also don't have "ong"
    Last edited by bawang; 07-25-2013 at 09:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    Greetings MarathonTmatt and welcome to the forum,

    Would you please clarify something for me?

    I read somewhere on the net that it was not Chao Lien Ho who introduced the 12 line Tan Tui to the Ching Wu curriculum. It was the father of Cai Long Yun. Is this true?

    If so, do you maintain the stomping and shouting methods?


    mickey
    Hi good to meet you and sorry for the late response. Personally I wouldn't be surprised if Cai Gui Qin (Cai Long Yun's father) influenced in some way, directly or indirectly, the 12 line Tan Tui of the Ching Wu curriculum. He was a very influential and famous martial artist during the same time era Ching Wu Assoc. was founded. I have never heard that story though, although I do know Cai Gui Qin met with Sun-Yat-Sen, and also Qiu Jin, a woman revolutionary, and I'm sure countless other influential martial artists/ people.
    Hua Quan style does have a a set of 12 core forms at the base of it's curriculum although each one of these forms is a complete training form unto itself and can also be practiced as two-man sets- then of course the advanced roads, long and short weapons, etc.
    I do see similar techniques in tan tui that are also found in the hua quan core forms. So there could be a Cai Cui Qin/ Hua influence to the tan tui sets, I have never heard of that, but thanks for bringing that up because it wouldn't be surprising if there was that influence.

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