Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 32

Thread: 3 steps 1 punch

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,664
    Blog Entries
    16

    3 steps 1 punch

    When people talk about "footwork", the 1st question that I would like to ask is "Do you train 3 steps 1 punch?" When your opponent retreats with combat speed and if your advance footwork is not fast enough to reach him, your "footwork" is not good enough.

    What's your opinion on this?
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    When people talk about "footwork", the 1st question that I would like to ask is "Do you train 3 steps 1 punch?" When your opponent retreats with combat speed and if your advance footwork is not fast enough to reach him, your "footwork" is not good enough.

    What's your opinion on this?
    Fighting is not running. In fighting, one must be able to keep his fighting structure at all times. From a biomechanical standpoint, moving multiple steps backwards will always allow for faster movement than will moving multiple steps forward.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    When people talk about "footwork", the 1st question that I would like to ask is "Do you train 3 steps 1 punch?" When your opponent retreats with combat speed and if your advance footwork is not fast enough to reach him, your "footwork" is not good enough.

    What's your opinion on this?
    1. Bruce Lee like fencing steps.

    You move your lead foot forward and your rear foot follows.

    2. There are running steps and jump steps in Mantis

    3. In Tong bei, we may walk or run to the side of the opponent like an s curve or figure 8.

    Depending on the distance

    we may walk, advance, run and jump etc.


  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by LaRoux View Post
    Fighting is not running.
    Sometimes you have to run down an opponent to capitalize on a strike, or his mistake. You'll notice after the initial strike lands, Barry follows with three steps and a punch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tia4142Puk
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,664
    Blog Entries
    16
    If you can run faster than your opponent,

    - your opponent's punches can never land on you.
    - your punches will have good chance to land on your opponent.

    The more that we train, the more that we may feel the importance of the footwork. You may start from

    1 step 3 punches -> 1 step 1 punch -> 2 steps 1 punch -> 3 steps 1 punches.

    If your punching speed keep the same, it will force your legs to move in fast speed. To apply your "chain punches" when you stand still is easy. To apply "chain punch" when you have to advance 3 steps for each punch of your "chain punches" is hard. Your training start to transfer from "static striking" into "dynamic striking". That's the right training path IMO.

    If I have time, I prefer to train like this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGxptvJlubY

    than to train like this:

    http://imageshack.us/a/img829/6677/yiquan.jpg

    "Moving" will always make you to live long.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 03-28-2013 at 08:00 PM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,111
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    You may start from

    1 step 3 punches -> 1 step 1 punch -> 2 steps 1 punch -> 3 steps 1 punches.

    If your punching speed keep the same, it will force your legs to move in fast speed. To apply your "chain punches" when you stand still is easy. To apply "chain punch" when you have to advance 3 steps for each punch of your "chain punches" is hard. Your training start to transfer from "static striking" into "dynamic striking". That's the right training path IMO.
    Agreed. And same for kicking as well. And for everything combined too.

    Then it gets to he point where punching, kicking, footwork/running all can have their own timing without holding back the other, but still be able to freely coordinate for power.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by LaRoux View Post

    I don't actually contribute here. I just post to be contrary and to disrupt the flow of discussion. I'm also a bit of a tool, and of course, I am a troll. But won't you please feed me!
    Accepting your problem is the first step toward recovery
    Chan Tai San Book at https://www.createspace.com/4891253

    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    well, like LKFMDC - he's a genuine Kung Fu Hero™
    Quote Originally Posted by Taixuquan99 View Post
    As much as I get annoyed when it gets derailed by the array of strange angry people that hover around him like moths, his good posts are some of my favorites.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    I think he goes into a cave to meditate and recharge his chi...and bite the heads off of bats, of course....

  8. #8
    In tong bei

    series of steps and series of strikes are coupled together

    your second step hurries the first step

    the second step is hurried by the 3rd step.

    fast, faster and even faster with each step and each strike

    your steps hurry like a wind or ji ru feng

    your strikes are fast like a lightening strike from the heaven to the earth

    kuai ru shan dian

    the whole poem

    is kuai ru shan dian ji ru feng.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,664
    Blog Entries
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by SPJ View Post
    In tong bei

    series of steps and series of strikes are coupled together...
    In longfist, the San Lu Pao Quan will take 1/2 basket ball field to train. The 3 steps 1 punch is in that form.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,111
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    In longfist, the San Lu Pao Quan will take 1/2 basket ball field to train. The 3 steps 1 punch is in that form.
    Similar for Mantis.

    Which is why I'm glad we actually do train on a basketball court.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    In longfist, the San Lu Pao Quan will take 1/2 basket ball field to train. The 3 steps 1 punch is in that form.
    Yes. I know what you mean.

    I learned mantis at young age.

    I was fast, however, my structure was loose and power not evident.

    There are many powers or jin in mantis, some fast, some slow, some apparent, some hidden, some crispy, some heavy --

    I was routed back to learn Ba Ji for structure and rooting

    learn tong bei for steps and crispy movement

    etc etc

    --


  12. #12
    footwork the most under rated part of training in MA.
    you need to have good footwork, 8 step IMHO is the best foot work ever trained. we use sliding steeping shifting hoping jumping, angular, box step, triangle step ,switch step etc etc,

    when we attack we move quickly advancing to disrupt their center and get them retreating you said John.
    Then never let them regain thier balance, once this is obtained its easy to overcome your opponent
    KUNG FU USA
    www.eightstepkungfu.com
    Teaching traditional Ba Bu Tang Lang (Eight Step Praying Mantis)
    Jin Gon Tzu Li Gung (Medical) Qigong
    Wu style Taiji Chuan



    Teacher always told his students, "You need to have Wude, patient, tolerance, humble, ..." When he died, his last words to his students was, "Remember that the true meaning of TCMA is fierce, poison, and kill."

  13. #13
    I dunno, pretty much every art I have trained has emphasized the footwork. It may be underrated at mcdojos and with silk wearing larpers, but pretty much everyone I know who does any MA agrees that footwork is VERY important.


    When you chase somebody down like that you need to be very careful. Just having them off balance doesn't mean you have won. How many times have we seen somebody fall into a triangle or something when going down on top of an opponent who has just been run down. Not to mention the fact that some people can still knock you out when they are on their heels.
    Last edited by Syn7; 03-29-2013 at 02:14 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,664
    Blog Entries
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    How many times have we seen somebody fall into a triangle or something when going down on top of an opponent who has just been run down.
    You have seen people who was on the bottom and tried to move back on top. You have never seen anybody who was on top and tried to move to the bottom. You still prefer to be on top than to be on the bottom. At least you have the weight advantage.
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 03-29-2013 at 05:21 PM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
    Less opinion -> less argument
    No opinion -> no argument

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,111
    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    When you chase somebody down like that you need to be very careful. Just having them off balance doesn't mean you have won. How many times have we seen somebody fall into a triangle or something when going down on top of an opponent who has just been run down. Not to mention the fact that some people can still knock you out when they are on their heels.
    True. Helps to be delivering the pain while running them them down.

    If you can run, kick, punch, kao, takedown, and change direction all at the same time the way a soccer player can run and kick, that is useful. We make our students train that way.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •