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Thread: Your Last Class

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    North Canton, OH
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    Your Last Class

    Tonight after teaching class and during my shower I started wondering what other praying mantis instructors had taught or were going to teach this evening.
    I thought it might be interesting to share as praying mantis instructors or students what went on in our last class.

    I'll start:

    1. Two Hand drills on the wooden dummy 挑 挑 衝 爪 & 摟 摟 衝 爪 (tiao tiao chong zhao & lou lou chong zhao),

    2. A partner drill that worked 勾 摟 採 閉 門 腿 (gou lou cai & bi men tui)

    3. A partner drill that taught the the use of 揪 腿 jiu tui (seizing leg) and a counter to the technique.

    3. Two partner drills that worked two of the twelve soft methods (螳 螂 柔手 tng lng ru shǒu):

    直統而抅手 - zh tǒng r ou shǒu - Attach the Hook to Straight Attacks
    開手而叠手 - kāi shǒu r di shǒu - Open Hands And Join Hands

    4. One inch fa jing

    5. The first ten moves from the Diao Fa form

    So what did you teach/do in your last class?

    Richard

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Newcastle upon tyne, UK
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    Warm up

    Partner drills using Dodge, Kwa and Chau toy principles/techniques

    Pad work drills taken from bung bo kuen

    Forms & lion Dance

    Stretching

    Paul
    www.moifa.co.uk

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Attacking with shin kick - jab combination.

    Avoiding shin kick - jab using switch footwork and parry.

    Countering shin kick - jab with mummy step - fung tung chui.

    Attacking with jab - cross - shin kick.

    Countering jab - cross - shin kick with parry - parry - angle change - midline punch.

    Avoiding midline punch with low outside parry.

    Using low/high change to follow up midline punch with highline punch.

    Avoiding the low/high attack with low outside parry and tiou jeong.

    Countering the low/high attack with low outside parry and grinding palm.

    Countering the low/high attack with low outside parry and any technique using ou-lou-tsai theory.

    Countering jab - cross - shin kick with parry - parry - angle change - low/high combination attack and grinding palm.

    Method of explosively closing the distance in the low/high attack.

    Method of jumping escape from the low/high attack.

    Method of following the low/high attack with aerial ou-lou-tsai technique to nullify the jumping escape.

    Method of hiding a kick follow-up to the aerial ou-lou-tsai using hgh/low theory.

    Method of continuous running and kicking to overrun the opponent.

  4. #4
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    washington,dc.
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    Warm-up/Stretching 30 minutes

    Individual Training 15 Minutes:
    -Chahp Cheui Kuen
    -Baht Bouh Faat
    -Tong Long Sao Kuen
    -Dahn Do Faat

    [B]30 Minute Partner Training:[B]
    -Ngau Teui Faat (partner leg hooking) and Yui Faat ( waist method) together with:
    -Lao Sao yee Lao Sao
    -Lao Sao yee Gwan Sao
    -Lao Sao yee Diu Sao

    Review of individual Training followed by student Demonstration 15 minutes
    ________
    no2 vaporizers
    ________
    WHOLESALE VAPORIZER
    Last edited by seung ga faat; 04-29-2011 at 01:36 AM.

  5. #5
    Just kinda stood there (catching as many glimpses of myself in the mirror as possible) while I counted in Japenese for the students practicing their Judo chops, karate chops and kung fu kicks.

    Told them they did a good and they can "level up" to the "dwarf warror" level soon. Only 20 levels to go after that!

  6. #6
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    Jan 2002
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    Nashville USA
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    HA! Good one Mantid1.
    I am still a student practicing - Wang Jie Long

    "Don`t Taze Me Bro"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Back home in Atlanta, GA, USA, after living in Singapore
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    532
    Not a mantis teacher so can't add value here, however I just wanted to say that this is an EXCELLENT idea for a thread! Hoping to find (or create) one for our style as well Thanks for the inspiration.
    Yes, "Northwind" is my internet alias used for years that has lots to do with my main style, as well as other lil cool things - it just works. Wanna know my name? Ask me


    http://www.pathsatlanta.org

  8. #8
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    Dave, Dave, Dave!

    Jim, you should know better than to encourage him!

    Northwind,
    Thanks for the positive feedback!

    Tonight's class:

    1. Three hand drills on the wooden dummy,

    2. Partner drills to work two of the twelve soft hand methods (螳 螂 柔手 tng lng ru shǒu),

    3. A partner drill that taught the the use of 揪 腿 jiu tui (seizing leg),

    4. Keyword theory 進 jn: Footwork drill to work bursting in (advancing) without telegraphing one's intent,

    5. Twelve moves from the Diao Fa form.

    As you can see I don't cover a lot of material in a class. I prefer to work a small amount of material with a large number of repetitions for muscle memory. Less is more in my opinion.

    Richard
    Last edited by mooyingmantis; 02-16-2010 at 05:27 PM.

  9. #9
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    One thing that can be useful is to assemble a blitz combination attack.

    Then gradually give the students a single move at a time.

    That way they can drill the single movements and develop some ability on those. You have a chance to give them coaching and corrections.

    The ones that are ready can get the next motion and drill that etc.

    During the class, beginners can continue drilling individual motions.

    More advanced students can work on pieces of the combination, on up to the complete sequence.

    You can give the more advanced students an explanation of the theory and principles related to that combination.

    As the students are able to put together the pieces of the combinations, they pair up with other students or the teacher so they can work on a live opponent.

    Then you have a chance to let them see typical counters to their attack, and you can explain all the whats and whys.

    For the students that are really catching on, you can show them variations on the material.

    This method works well in a class with mixed levels of students.

    Everybody gets something they can work on. Advanced students still practice their basics, but also get instruction suitable to their level of understanding. Beginners have a chance to see a little bit of how their basics are put to use, and they get incentive for practicing so they can get to a higher skill level.

    You can spend 3-4 hours of class working on all the details of a single combination attack and methods of countering. Which is what was going on in my previous post. Looks like a lot of stuff, but it's not.
    Last edited by -N-; 02-16-2010 at 06:37 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Class last night, learned a number of new variations for the Lion Dance on "Chut Sing". Speaking of which, Gung Hay Fat Choy to all

    Tonight, continuation of Mm Long Gwan staff form.

  11. #11
    45 minute warm up punching drills horse stance etc etc.

    review of students levels with individual attention and corrections.

    joint locking, then anatomy and philosophy
    our classes are 2 hours long as well.
    KUNG FU USA
    www.eightstepkungfu.com
    Teaching traditional Ba Bu Tang Lang (Eight Step Praying Mantis)
    Jin Gon Tzu Li Gung (Medical) Qigong
    Wu style Taiji Chuan



    Teacher always told his students, "You need to have Wude, patient, tolerance, humble, ..." When he died, his last words to his students was, "Remember that the true meaning of TCMA is fierce, poison, and kill."

  12. #12
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    -N-,
    Excellent explanation of your methodology. Sounds like a great way to teach!

    Earthdragon,
    Glad to see I'm not the only one that includes anatomy in their MA program!
    Do you include first-aid and CPR also?

    Richard
    Last edited by mooyingmantis; 02-18-2010 at 01:22 PM.

  13. #13
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    Tonight's class:

    1. Two hand drills on the wooden dummy,

    2. Partner drills to work two of the twelve soft hand methods (螳 螂 柔手 tng lng ru shǒu),

    3. Three partner drills to work combinations,

    4. A partner drill that taught the the use of 揪 腿 jiu tui (seizing leg),

    5. Keyword theory 進 jn drill,

    6. Keyword theory 樞 shu drill,

    7. Partner drill to practice side kicks for san shou and counters.

  14. #14
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    532
    Mooying - Can you share what you mean by "keyword"? Sorry, I'm also an SEO-guy, so what first comes to mind is probably something different than what you mean :P

    Although not a mantis guy, thought I'd go ahead and pipe in

    Wed., 02 - 17 - 10 (Wednesdays focus on Jibengong, or basics)
    Salutations & Bow-in
    Joint Rotations
    Stretching - top
    Stretching - Middle
    Stretching - bottom
    Medicine Ball Strength exercises
    Twining/coiling exercises
    Seated breathing

    Horse - 2 mins
    Bow - 2 mins
    Cat - 2 mins
    Bow - 2 mins
    Horse - 2 mins

    During stance holding, taught & drilled on various language things: 1 - 10 in Mandarin & Cantonese + number system (to make "23" simply = 2, 10, 3), basic martial terminology of "fist", "palm", "claw" & "kick".

    Then I did something fairly radical for me, and taught Wu Bu Quan. I say radical for me, because it's a new form created for compulsory wushu. My teacher taught it to us, but I never wanted to teach it due to its association to modern stuff. But recently found that many traditionalists have incorporated it into their curriculum, as it's a nice quick-n-easy yet helpful lil drill for stance work + hand work & coordination, and that some of the stance progressions are fairly common in traditional forms.

    So I taught that, while teaching the mandarin names for the stances.
    And we did Wu Bu Quan again and again.

    Then we did some form-work; wherever each person was in the system - they practiced, asked questions, corrections, etc.

    Then I did some simple speed/power drills of Horse to Bow with forearm/palm block into eagle claw grab & pull then opposite hand punch. And then back to horse as grab-pull. Went from 1 punch, to 2, etc. up to 10. Everyone was dead by then :P

    Then we did some Iron Pole or 3-star hit or whatever is your preferred terminology - but the thing where 2 folks are in mabu and hit forearms 3 times etc. Although we have various progressions of this including box work, etc., this night it was just the basic.

    Rub the Jiao.
    Salutations and bow-out.

    Go to the pub.
    Did I say that out loud?
    Yes, "Northwind" is my internet alias used for years that has lots to do with my main style, as well as other lil cool things - it just works. Wanna know my name? Ask me


    http://www.pathsatlanta.org

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooyingmantis View Post
    -N-,
    Excellent explanation of your methodology. Sounds like a great way to teach!
    Maybe. At least it makes it fun for the teacher

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