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Thread: yellow face/white washing.

  1. #76
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    It's actually quite funny, regarding Hellboy producer Christa Campbell's remarks. Since it's primarily Asian-Americans complaining about whitewashing a definitely Asian character, she's essentially giving the typical white person's response: "STFU and know your place."

    OTOH, if it were African-Americans complaining about a whitewashed character, she's have said, "We sincerely apologize to the African-American community for our insensitivity and stupidity at miscasting such an incredible black character with a white actor, and promise from the depths of our hearts to never do it again. There is no excuse for our ignorance, and we are doing everything in our power to change and give African-American actors the opportunities they richly deserve."

    The difference between a condescending response and full-out a$$-kissing is in the general perception of a specific group/demographic, and the perceived amount of public backlash and media outrage they are likely to receive from it.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 08-28-2017 at 08:55 AM.

  2. #77
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    Back to Hell

    Good play for Ed. He now becomes a hero. Let's see if they recast Daimio as Asian.

    Ed Skrein Leaves ‘Hellboy’ Reboot After Whitewashing Backlash; Lionsgate & Millennium Respond
    by Dino-Ray Ramos
    August 28, 2017 12:42pm


    REX/Shutterstock

    Last week, Ed Skrein was excited to announce he would be playing the character of Major Ben Daimio in the upcoming Hellboy: Rise Of The Blood Queen. In the comics, the character is of Asian heritage, and the news prompted immediate backlash from the Asian Pacific American community. Today, Skrein took to Twitter responding to the public outcry, saying he is stepping down from the role and that, “I must do what I feel is right.”

    In a statement to Deadline, Hellboy producers Larry Gordon and Lloyd Levin, Lionsgate and Millennium said: “Ed came to us and felt very strongly about this. We fully support his unselfish decision. It was not our intent to be insensitive to issues of authenticity and ethnicity, and we will look to recast the part with an actor more consistent with the character in the source material.”

    Read Skrein’s full statement:

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    Ending his tweet with “I hope it makes a difference,” Skrein made it clear he was listening to the APA community and is aware of the importance of inclusion and proper representation in the arts. His thoughtful response and decision to leave the project may be the start of more projects to follow suit when casting roles meant for people of color.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #78
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    Thumbs up

    Great decision by Ed Skrein. And he did it quickly, too.

  4. #79
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    Chloe Bennet


    RISING STAR
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/agents-...nese-last-name
    TV’s only Asian-American superhero opens up about the need for representation onscreen—and why her band of SHIELD agents totally belong in Marvel’s movies.
    MELISSA LEON
    04.05.16 1:34 AM ET

    Four years ago, Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD star Chloe Bennet was known professionally as Chloe Wang, aspiring actress and teenage dabbler in Shanghai pop stardom. In the states, however, Hollywood casting agents were less than welcoming.
    At least until she changed her last name.

    “Oh, the first audition I went on after I changed my name, I got booked,” Bennet tells The Daily Beast, in an interview timed to Marvel’s Women of Power month. “So that’s a pretty clear little snippet of how Hollywood works.”
    That audition was for the role of Hailey, an office assistant on ABC’s Nashville. That same year, Bennet was cast as the lead in Marvel’s first cinematic universe TV show, the Joss Whedon-created SHIELD. Over three seasons, Skye, a headstrong young “hacktivist” who gets recruited by SHIELD and eventually discovers her real identity, the half-Inhuman Daisy Johnson (aka Quake), has evolved into what is still a rarity on TV: a superhero who happens to be both female and Asian-American.

    “I wish people talked about that more,” Bennet says. “I don't know if it’s good or bad, but when Supergirl came out, people were like, ‘This is the only superhero on TV that’s a female!’ And I was like, ‘Hold on! I’m pretty sure Daisy’s been here.’ And I also happen to be half-Chinese and I’m so proud of that.”

    “I want to be clear because some of my Asian-American fans seem to think I did that [changed last names] because I didn’t want to known as Chinese, but it’s so the opposite,” she adds. “I just wanted to be known as me and let my personality define who I was, rather than my ethnicity.”

    Bennet—who is loud and funny and blunt in conversation—then launches into her SHIELD audition story, told with a mixture of endearing self-loathing and pride.



    “When we were down to seven girls [up for the role of Skye], it was this completely diverse group of girls I was up against. And it was really about who was right for the part,” she says. “We were testing and we came out of the room and I was up next and Joss Whedon was there and said, ‘Hi.’ I got kind of nervous and looked at him. He just looked really tired. And I was like, ‘You look like ****’—this right before I went in for my last audition.
    “He started laughing and was like, ‘Well, I am tired,’” she says, groaning at the memory. “And I was like, ‘I mean, you look tired in a good way, like you’re really busy! And accomplished!’ It was so Skye Season 1 that I think he was like, ‘Yup, that’s her.’”
    Because of Marvel’s “cinematic universe” design, SHIELD takes place during the events of the comic book movie franchise’s big-screen exploits—meaning that whatever havoc the Avengers wreak in their city-smashing adventures has real-world consequences for the show’s on-the-ground SHIELD agents.



    When Captain America: The Winter Soldier revealed that the evil Nazi organization HYDRA had been embedded within SHIELD since shortly after World War II, the show, whose entire first season built up to the events of Winter Soldier, took that and ran with it, spinning out two seasons of intrigue.
    But while Marvel’s movies often affect the show, SHIELD’s narrative rarely bears weight on the big-budget blockbusters—even when the stories it’s telling should. In the upcoming Captain America: Civil War, for example, Marvel’s superheroes choose whether to submit to official government oversight, a measure (called the Sokovia Accords, the onscreen version of the comic books’ Superhero Registration Act) pushed on them by a United Nations panel.
    Incorporating SHIELD’s ongoing Inhumans storyline would actually raise the stakes of the movie: The presence of hundreds if not thousands of undiscovered Inhumans (people with the ability to develop superpowers) would give governments extra incentive to push the Sokovia Accords on all superhumans. Recent interviews with Civil War directors Joe and Anthony Russo, however, indicate the directing duo are entirely unconcerned with what’s going on in the world of SHIELD.



    “I think we’re all on the same page besides them,” Bennet says, sighing at the missed opportunity. “But they’re gonna do what they’re gonna do, and I’m really happy with our little show. We’ve been dealing with the topic of Civil War for a while now—at least, Daisy has. She’s a SHIELD agent but also a human and she’s completely torn.”
    If Bennet had her way, of course, Civil War would bring certain SHIELD-specific changes to the Marvel universe: “I would like us to be put in the movie,” she laughs. “That would make sense. I would like the Avengers to find out that Agent Coulson’s still alive. And Daisy’s incredibly powerful. I think you’ll see toward the end of the season her strength as a character and a leader, and her power as a superhero really expands—I’m just saying, the Avengers could use our help, if they just asked.”
    Marvel’s TV universe, in the meantime, continues to expand, with street-level heroes like Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist getting their own Netflix shows. With the latter series’s casting announcement—revealing that Game of Thrones actor Finn Jones will be taking on the role of Danny Rand—a familiar refrain decrying the MCU’s lack of diversity reverberated across the Internet again.
    When asked if she was among the thousands calling for the traditionally white Danny Rand—a kung fu master—to be played by an Asian actor, Bennet answers without missing a beat.



    “One hundred percent. I actually saw that [casting] news and I can’t lie, I was a little [disappointed],” she says, before breaking into laughter again. “I love Marvel, but…”
    “I know they want to stay true to their characters but, you know, every female character in Marvel comics also has, like, triple-Z-sized boobs,” she reasons. “So if they cast actors based on the way characters look on the page, I don’t think even Scarlett Johansson—well, maybe Scarlett Johansson—would be in the movies.”
    As for Marvel’s ever-expanding movie arm—which will feature its first character of color in a stand-alone film in 2018’s Black Panther—Bennet maintains there’s room for improvement there as well.
    “I think they could do better,” she says. “You know, there are a lot of white guys named Chris. But I think they will, because it’s important. It’s the right thing to do. Marvel’s a smart company and I think they will represent their fans from around the world. They can take note from the way we’re going on the show, ’cause we’re doing a pretty good job.”
    In terms of gender dynamics, Bennet points out that “90 percent of the rescuing” done in SHIELD is by female characters and “90 percent” of the stunts are performed by women actors as well, including herself. Still, she’s anxiously awaiting her character Daisy’s introduction as a playable character in the Marvel mobile game Contest of Champions in the fall, for the sake of watching Quake in action minus the actual stunt work.
    “I’m so stoked. My brother is so jealous,” she laughs. “I’m really excited to get to do all these stunts without actually getting hurt. I’m currently covered in bruises.”
    Bruises never stopped a badass lady from rescuing those in need, of course. “[Our characters] don’t need any rescuing from men,” Bennet says. “We can handle ourselves very well, thank you.”
    Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. & whitewashing
    Gene Ching
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  5. #80
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    This would be a great play

    If this happens, I'd make an effort to support this film and I'm not that into Hellboy. It's like the Star Wars cantina scene on steroids.

    SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 2:29pm PT by Borys Kit
    Daniel Dae Kim in Talks to Replace Ed Skrein in 'Hellboy' Reboot (Exclusive)


    Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images
    Daniel Dae Kim

    Skrein left the project after an outcry over whitewashing an Asian-American character.

    Daniel Dae Kim, who recently left CBS’ Hawaii Five-0, is in negotiations to join the cast of Lionsgate and Millennium’s Hellboy reboot.

    Kim will step into the role left vacant by Ed Skrein after an outcry over whitewashing a Asian-American character.

    Kim will play Major Ben Daimio, a rugged military member of the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense who, due to a supernatural encounter, can turn into a jaguar when angered or in pain. The character is Japanese-American in the Hellboy comics by creator Mike Mignola.

    Skrein had nabbed the role in August but, after a social media protest, made the unprecedented move to step down later that month.

    “It is clear that representing this character in a culturally accurate way holds significance for people, and that to neglect this responsibility would continue a worrying tendency to obscure ethnic minority stories and voice in the Arts. I feel it is important to honor and respect that,” he said in a statement.

    Lionsgate concurred, saying, “It was not our intent to be insensitive to issues of authenticity and ethnicity, and we will look to recast the part with an actor more consistent with the character in the source material."

    Kim is Korean-American, and the actor is no stranger to standing up for his beliefs. In June, he quit Hawaii Five-0 after a salary dispute with CBS, as he had been seeking equal pay to the show’s stars, Alex O'Loughlin and Scott Caan. His departure, along with co-star Grace Park, left the show temporarily without Asian regulars.

    David Harbour (Stranger Things) is starring in Hellboy, which reboots the franchise centered on the demonic hero from the Mignola comic books. Game of Thrones director Neil Marshall is helming the project.

    Kim has been acting since the early 1990s and has appeared on shows such as ER and Angel. He became a known quantity and star thanks to his breakout work on ABC’s Lost, and co-starred on Five-O since it launched in 2010.

    Kim is repped by UTA.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #81
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    I think very few people remember, or are even aware, that Daniel Dae Kim played a Shaolin monk in the 1991 film American Shaolin, by HK's Seasonal Film Corp. Corey Yuen and Yuen Tak did the fight choreography. It was one of the Seasonal Film's designed specifically to bring HK-style action to the American market. That role was the very first time I had ever seen Daniel Dae Kim, and I only remembered him much later when I recognized him in other stuff.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 09-12-2017 at 10:34 AM.

  7. #82
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    Ddk

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    If this happens, I'd make an effort to support this film and I'm not that into Hellboy.
    Well, I guess I'm committed now.

    SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 12:08pm PT by Borys Kit
    Daniel Dae Kim Applauds Ed Skrein for Bowing Out of 'Hellboy' Amid Whitewashing Outcry (Exclusive)


    Getty Images
    Daniel Dae Kim, Ed Skrein

    In his statement to THR, Kim confirms his casting and applauds Skrein and the producers for "championing the notion that Asian characters should be played by Asian or Asian American actors."

    Daniel Dae Kim, officially confirming he has joined the cast of Lionsgate and Millennium’s Hellboy reboot, issued a statement thanking the movie’s producers and Ed Skrein, the actor who stepped aside so that a culturally appropriate person could take the role.

    “I applaud the producers and, in particular, Ed Skrein for championing the notion that Asian characters should be played by Asian or Asian American actors,” said Kim. “He could not have addressed the issue more elegantly and I remain indebted to him for his strength of character."

    Kim is playing Major Ben Daimio, a rugged military member of the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense who, due to a supernatural encounter, can turn into a jaguar when angered or in pain. The character is Japanese-American in the Hellboy comics by creator Mike Mignola.

    In August, Skrein was cast in the part but, after an outcry over whitewashing an Asian-American character, made the unprecedented move to step down later that month.

    “It is clear that representing this character in a culturally accurate way holds significance for people, and that to neglect this responsibility would continue a worrying tendency to obscure ethnic minority stories and voice in the Arts. I feel it is important to honor and respect that,” Skrein said in a statement at the time.

    In his statement, Kim now says, "I’m excited to confirm that I’ve officially joined the cast of Hellboy. We start shooting today and I’ll be playing Ben Daimio, alongside our very talented cast, headed by David Harbour, and director, Neil Marshall. Thank you for all the supportive tweets and comments, especially in light of the recent events surrounding its original casting."

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    I think very few people remember, or are even aware, that Daniel Dae Kim played a Shaolin monk in the 1991 film American Shaolin, by HK's Seasonal Film Corp.
    You know, I'm not sure I ever saw this. I was thinking about taht film when my Shixiong Matt Polly came out with his book American Shaolin, and I honestly can't remember anything about it, so maybe I never saw it. I suppose I should, huh?
    Gene Ching
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  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    You know, I'm not sure I ever saw this. I was thinking about taht film when my Shixiong Matt Polly came out with his book American Shaolin, and I honestly can't remember anything about it, so maybe I never saw it. I suppose I should, huh?
    It's a low-budget Shaolin ripoff of Karate Kid, but IMO it's more entertaining than KK. It's one of those 'so bad it's good' types of movies (like all of those American Seasonal Film productions). The fight scenes are certainly better. It IS a stereotypical white savior movie, and unfortunately Daniel Dae Kim only has a supporting role, but he looked good in the fight scenes he had.

    Overall, American Shaolin's target audience seems to be Caucasian-American nerds with yellow fever and fantasies of glory who were picked on by the jocks in high school, lol. The main bad guy/bully's name is 'Trevor Gotitall' (get it?).

    Last edited by Jimbo; 09-18-2017 at 05:10 PM.

  9. #84
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    Fullmetal Alchemist = too Japanese?

    Well, that's a twist.

    Fullmetal Alchemist Anime Director Criticizes The Live-Action Movie's All-Japanese Cast
    Brian Ashcraft
    9/20/17 5:00am



    The live-action Fullmetal Alchemist movie cast is all-Japanese, even if the characters are not. The anime’s director says this was “a bad idea.”

    While speaking at a recent stage show in Tokyo, Fullmetal Alchemist anime director Seiji Mizushima is quoted by ANN as saying, “It was a bad idea to only use Japanese actors.”

    Continuing, Mizushima added, “If you asked me whether I think the cast could pull it off, I’d say that no, they can’t.” He also said, “It’s hard for actors to capture the look and feel of the original manga.”

    He didn’t have kind words for the recent live-action Gintama adaptation, saying that it “just looked stupid.”

    That doesn’t mean Mizushima hopes the live-action Fullmetal Alchemist movie will fail. On the contrary, while he mentioned the merits of anime adaptations, he did say he was “rooting” for the Fullmetal Alchemist movie. Bad ideas and all, I guess.

    Gene Ching
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  10. #85
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    Sometimes it feels that people have forgotten that TRUE equality means the best people for the job REGARDLESS of race.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  11. #86
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    Thumbs up Our 'token' race thread...I'm glad it's civil

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    The main bad guy/bully's name is 'Trevor Gotitall' (get it?).
    Thanks for the link. Now I'll have to check it out sometime.

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Sometimes it feels that people have forgotten that TRUE equality means the best people for the job REGARDLESS of race.
    True but when the job has a race element intrinsic to the role, that gets complicated. There's a double standard for sure, but that's exactly the point. For example, you can't cast a white Othello, but you could cast a multi-racial Hamlet. Did you ever see the Peter Brook's The Mahabharata (1989)? It's the Indian classic, but Brook assembled a very diverse cast and it was amazing. It gave the tale a much more universal feel like it should have.

    Gavin Polone on Race, Business and the Real Cost of Hollywood Whitewashing
    6:30 AM PDT 9/21/2017 by Gavin Polone


    Illustration by: Lars Leetaru

    Should Arab Princess Jasmine be played by an Indian actress? No way, but when a ‘Hellboy’ actor gives up a role that had been reconceived for him, it sets a dangerous creative precedent that impacts Hollywood and could even stunt efforts toward inclusion.
    When I was 9, my mother took me to a production of The King and I that starred Ricardo Montalban as the King of Siam. This was prior to Montalban premiering in Fantasy Island and pitching the "fine Corinthian leather" of the Chrysler Cordoba in TV commercials, so my familiarity with him came from the original Planet of the Apes movies, where he played Senor Armando, a circus owner who is sympathetic to the cause of talking apes. As I watched the musical, I remember thinking it was disturbing that a man I knew to be Mexican was playing the king of an Asian nation. By that time, most people knew that white actors donning blackface was wrong, but I was in the minority with my discomfort with the idea that brown actors were thought to be like Type O blood and could play any ethnicity. The L.A. Times, writing about King and I, lauded Moltanban's racial pliability by noting, without irony, how he "has kept his name above the title for more than a quarter century by stamping his own interpretation on roles, playing Japanese, Greeks, Italians, Armenians, French, Indians, Germans and Turks."

    That a Mexican actor playing a Thai or Japanese character drew no further comment in 1974 isn't remarkable. That we're still trying to figure out, 43 years later, when a person of one race or distinct ethnicity should be cast as a character of another, is. The answer is pretty black and white: They shouldn't. Joseph Fiennes shouldn't have played Michael Jackson, even for a comedic TV anthology; Jake Gyllenhaal shouldn't have played the prince of Persia; Rooney Mara shouldn't have played a Native American in Pan; and the con*troversy surrounding the casting of Naomi Scott as Jasmine, an Arab, in Disney's remake of Aladdin is fully warranted. Maybe there aren't any Arab actresses as good as Scott, or maybe those in charge found her look more "appealing," but casting an Indian-British woman as an Arab can only come off as another example of "brown is brown," and that is unacceptable.

    While those examples are clearly improper, other cases of "whitewashing" land in the gray zone. As important as it is to call out obviously racist or insensitive casting choices, it is just as important to define what should be permissible when representing ethnicity onscreen and what isn't really a problem and should not be dragged into this discussion.


    From left: Zhang, Yeoh and Gong in Memoirs of a Geisha.
    David James/Columbia/Dreamworks/Spyglass/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock

    In 2005, there was outrage in Japan for the casting of Chinese actresses Zhang Ziyi and Gong Li, as well as Malaysian actress Michelle Yeoh, as leads in Memoirs of a Geisha. Given the historical tensions that have remained since World War II, the obtuseness of these choices was clear (as was changing the eye color to blue of the Asian woman on the poster). But even without political tensions, is it OK that Randall Park, a Korean-American, plays a Taiwanese-American on Fresh Off the Boat? I could see that go either way. Can any Latino play the part of any Latin American? Can a Spaniard play a Peruvian? I'm not sure. Many Latin Americans are partly or wholly of Spanish heritage, just as most white Americans have European ancestors. What about a Brazilian playing a Chilean? I think the answer to all of those questions is, "It depends."

    Where the "whitewashing" label is misapplied is when a character is changed from an ethnicity in the source material to another to accommodate a specific actor. This is not the same as casting someone of one race to play a character of another. Much has been made of Scarlett Johansson's starring role in Ghost in the Shell, whose character in the original Japanese anime was, of course, Japanese; and Tilda Swinton being cast in Doctor Strange as the Ancient One, a character who was Tibetan in the comic. Neither of these examples was evidence of the distasteful racism of white actors playing a race other than their own, but rather the common business choice of adapting a property for a wider audience. The Ghost in the Shell filmmakers changed the location from Japan to a nonspecific future world, with the intent of making the premise more accessible to a global audience. In moving the location from Japan, the film didn't need its heroine to be any specific ethnicity (not to mention that she was a robot); what she did have to be was a big star capable of justifying a huge budget, and Johansson is that.

    Remaking a foreign property for a larger audience always involves changes. In 1960, when Yul Brynner, a Russian who won an Oscar for The King and I, remade Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, he didn't develop it as an English-language version of a Japanese samurai movie but rather as a Western, which was a more popular genre throughout the world. This wasn't "whitewashing," just smart business. Casting Eli Wallach, a Jew from Brooklyn, as a Mexican in the film was egregious "whitewashing," though.

    Marvel Studios claimed that it changed the Ancient One in Doctor Strange from a Tibetan monk to a Celtic woman to avoid the stereotype of an old Asian wise man. Of course, it could have changed that stereotype by keeping the character as Tibetan and not writing him stereotypically. My guess is that Marvel wanted to run from any connection to a Tibetan character, given the conflict between Tibet and the Chinese government. China is the second largest film market in the world, and Disney's theme parks there are visited by 17 million people a year. There is no reason to believe that this was anything other than a one-time instance of "greenwashing," rather than "whitewashing," and it is unrealistic to think that the world's largest media company should risk a huge financial hit to preserve the cultural integrity of a secondary character in a movie.


    Eric McCandless/ABC; Jay Maidment/Marvel; Courtesy of Photofest
    Park in Fresh Off the Boat, Swinton in Doctor Strange and Gyllenhaal in Prince of Persia.

    It is unfortunate, though, that actor Ed Skrein felt he had to drop out of the new Hellboy movie because some disagreed with him being cast in a part that is Japanese-American in the comic. It's not as though Skrein would have been a better economic choice than Daniel Dae Kim, the Korean-American who replaced him. Actually, I think Kim is better from a marketing perspective. The filmmakers were making a creative choice in going with Skrein, and the outside pressure to change creative decisions because a fictional character was one race or another is a double-edged sword. After all, a similar creative decision led Marvel to change Nick Fury, who is white in the Avengers comic, and cast Samuel L. Jackson, which was an inspired move and led to greater diversity in the franchise. And if those who protested Skrein wanted true ethnic alignment with the comics, they should still be upset that a Japanese-American wasn't cast.

    Those who identify and protest "whitewashing" and push for realistic change are helping, for the most part, to move the industry forward in depictions of ethnicity. Studios and filmmakers need to listen for these cues from the community and make changes. And when it is unclear if it will be acceptable to cast an actor outside of the ethnicity of the character in question, there are always two possible alternatives: 1) cast the best actor available who is of the same ethnicity as the character; or 2) cast Lou Diamond Phillips. Phillips has played more ethnicities than almost anyone, from the Mexican-American singer Ritchie Valens in La Bamba to, yes, King Mongkut in The King and I. Phillips can do this because he was born in the Philippines to a Filipina mother of Chinese, Japanese, Hawaiian and Spanish heritage and to an American father who was one-quarter Cherokee. So, when in doubt, LDP's got you covered.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #87
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    People should just stick to what was written.
    If its a bald asian man, it should be the best bald asian actor you can get.
    If its a blonde skinny girl with bog boobs it should be the best blonde skinny big boobed actor you can get.
    I saw the Death Note Netflex movie and it suck compared to the anime and not because it was whitewashed but because it wasn't very good, period.
    The obvious white/black washing made it worse for those that saw the anime,but only because the writers weren't smart enough to make the movie different, yet based on the premise, of the anime.
    Bad writing.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #88
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    An insightful interview with Jake Choi on the emasculation/desexualization of Asian males in Hollywood:

    https://www.salon.com/2016/06/01/asi...erican_actors/

    This interview is relatively brief, and really only discusses the tip of the iceberg.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 10-02-2017 at 08:53 AM.

  14. #89
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    The Outsider

    The Last Samurai, Shogun, this...Do we need an indie thread for Gaijin movies?

    2.23.2018
    JARED LETO STARS AS A JAPANESE GANGSTER IN 'THE OUTSIDER'
    Wait, what?



    In the illustrious Hollywood tradition of movies about white dudes who are better at being Asian than actual Asians, here's your first look at the Yakuza period thriller The Outsider, in which Jared Leto becomes a Japanese gangster. Wait, whaaat? Yup. The Netflix original movie follows a white guy who works his way up the ranks to become a rare non-Japanese member of the fearsome Yakuza.

    The official synopsis reads: "Set in post-WWII Japan, an imprisoned American soldier (Leto) is released with the help of his Yakuza cellmate. Now free, he sets out to earn their respect and repay his debt while navigating the dangerous criminal underworld." I assume this means that the white guy will do a lot of way crazier **** than any of the Japanese guys, to prove his worth. And romance some Japanese ladies along the way, of course.

    Here's the trailer:



    Oh, brother.

    Directed by Martin Zandvliet, The Outsider also stars Tadanobu Asano, Kippei Shiina and Shioli Kutsuna. You know, in another grand Hollywood tradition of really great Asian actors playing supporting roles to white stars.

    We actually first heard about this movie back in 2011, when Warner Bros. originally acquired the script. I said this back then, as I've said many times before and since, and I'll say it again: Hollywood can make a movie set anywhere in the world, in any era of history... and always somehow find a way for the movie to star a white guy.

    The Outsider premieres on Netflix on March 9.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,885
    I could accept a non-Japanese Yakuza being portrayed by an actor of Korean descent, because in reality, there are Japanese-born Koreans who are Yakuza.

    Jared Leto would have as much chance of becoming a high-level Yakuza as Tadanobu Asano would have of heading an Italian/Sicilian Mafia family.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 02-23-2018 at 10:17 AM.

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