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Thread: My daughter won the 2013 International Pole Championship

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Functional stength is task specific, this is strength that is built by doing the given task.
    Like pole dancing or swinging an ax or a sledgehammer, to wrestling.
    Then there is "raw" or "pure" strength like powerlifters and "strong man" competitions get, this is just pure strength ( though much of what strongmen do can also be task/function specific).
    It is not a case of either/or in regards to what is better.
    No can argue with the benefits of pure strength since it translates over into everything we do.
    Functional strength doesn't really mean anything more than being strong at a given task.
    That the vase majority of professional sports athletes do some type of weight training should make it clear that it is very useful.
    I mean, who doesn't want to be strong? since when is being weak better than strong?
    Since never of course.
    I can't do have the crap your daughter can, I don't think I would want to, LOL !
    Of course just the other day I spent 4 hours hauling 90lbs bags up stairs and never got tired or sore or even winded so, I guess my "raw strength" was good even for that "function".
    its also the case that the lighter the bodyweight the more easily one can move that bodyweight, hence you dont see any heavyweight gymnasts

  2. #17
    It's about time management and balancing strength with everything else. I remember wrestling gorilla manchildren who weighed much more than me and spent way too much time on weights and not enough time doing mat drills. Sure, they could pick me up and drop me on my face, but if I survived that, and to be fair sometimes I didn't, I would usually win. Whereas the guys who outweighed me by a bunch and did hardcore mat drills would beat me 99% of the time.

    Like I said, I'm not knocking weights. I just think some folks overemphasize one aspect and neglect others. I started rolling with a few cats I know from the gym. One is learning boxing and wanted to learn submissions. This guy is stacked, but the mat drills do him in every time. So many years of trying to look pretty, now he's starting to learn what it's really like to be strong AND more rounded.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    its also the case that the lighter the bodyweight the more easily one can move that bodyweight, hence you dont see any heavyweight gymnasts
    This is very true. My 3 lb Yorkie can stand on her 2 front legs, walk and pee at the same time.

    http://imageshack.com/a/img19/8890/knq0.jpg
    Last edited by YouKnowWho; 12-09-2013 at 10:07 AM.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    It's about time management and balancing strength with everything else. I remember wrestling gorilla manchildren who weighed much more than me and spent way too much time on weights and not enough time doing mat drills. Sure, they could pick me up and drop me on my face, but if I survived that, and to be fair sometimes I didn't, I would usually win. Whereas the guys who outweighed me by a bunch and did hardcore mat drills would beat me 99% of the time.

    Like I said, I'm not knocking weights. I just think some folks overemphasize one aspect and neglect others. I started rolling with a few cats I know from the gym. One is learning boxing and wanted to learn submissions. This guy is stacked, but the mat drills do him in every time. So many years of trying to look pretty, now he's starting to learn what it's really like to be strong AND more rounded.
    No one will argue with you on that.
    As MA we have to prioritize our MA first and everything else second.
    Strength training is secondary to building a solid MA foundation.
    Sure there are times when we will prioritize strength, just as there are times we prioritize weapons or speed or stamina or flexibility.
    The point is that is is very rarely a case of either/or.

    You make a valid point about time management because, time is finite.
    That said, MA are notorious "time wasters", why?
    We can spend hours and hours, days and years training and NEVER using it !
    Here is the thing though, IF we go strictly on time management and a cost to benefit ration then MA makes LESS sense than ST !
    We use strength in varying degrees everyday, we rarely use our MA skill.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  5. #20
    What I said was more a comment about ST in general. So far I have been very lucky. I am one of the only people I practice with who isn't dealing with some ****ty injury in one way or another. I honestly believe it's because I was into other physical things outside of grappling and MA's. Had I not done these other activities, I can totally see myself getting sucked into following one path too far. I want to be a jack of all trades, so to speak. Not a master of one. It's about overall usefulness. I'll never forget how to fight and I will always practice it. But I'm glad I get high level exercise from other areas in my life too. One thing I really wanna do is start climbing more. So fun. To be honest, I think gym rats of all kinds are missing out on some beautiful applications and abilities as far as a high level of fitness is concerned. Why throw all your eggs in to so few baskets? Unless you have a very specific professional goal, that is. In that case, you kinda have to run with the program, but a price will be extracted later. Bet on that.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syn7 View Post
    What I said was more a comment about ST in general. So far I have been very lucky. I am one of the only people I practice with who isn't dealing with some ****ty injury in one way or another. I honestly believe it's because I was into other physical things outside of grappling and MA's. Had I not done these other activities, I can totally see myself getting sucked into following one path too far. I want to be a jack of all trades, so to speak. Not a master of one. It's about overall usefulness. I'll never forget how to fight and I will always practice it. But I'm glad I get high level exercise from other areas in my life too. One thing I really wanna do is start climbing more. So fun. To be honest, I think gym rats of all kinds are missing out on some beautiful applications and abilities as far as a high level of fitness is concerned. Why throw all your eggs in to so few baskets? Unless you have a very specific professional goal, that is. In that case, you kinda have to run with the program, but a price will be extracted later. Bet on that.
    Out of interest how old are you and what martial arts are you still training on a weekly basis? I ask because most of the long term martial arts injuries I have had, and seen in others come in those that are still and training hard in their 30’s and beyond,
    Also are you still competing in grappling and striking? Because outside of the age issue most long term injuries come about from those getting ready for competition (not from the competition itself funnily enough?
    As far as the gym stuff coming back to hurt you in the long term again it all depends and isn’t that clear cut, I know several lifelong powerlifters who are still training (and in some cases competing) in their 60s and even 70s, yes they have some issues, such as limited overhead range of motion, elbow pains etc but who is to say this is a bad thing, when you compare them to the average 70 year old who cant even get out of a chair or walk without some kind of aid
    A physiotherapist I know who still lifts weights,, plays rugby and does martial arts in his mid 50s said the number one issue he sees in older patients is joint and muscle problems due to under use, he would rather they did resistance work that cardio work, in fact he took up weights when he turned 50 for that very reason

  7. #22
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    I have found similar conclusions as Frost has.
    I would also add that you can use resistance training for your cardio too and get the "best of both worlds" sort of speaking.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  8. #23
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    This is how it started...

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    Out of interest how old are you and what martial arts are you still training on a weekly basis? I ask because most of the long term martial arts injuries I have had, and seen in others come in those that are still and training hard in their 30’s and beyond,
    Also are you still competing in grappling and striking? Because outside of the age issue most long term injuries come about from those getting ready for competition (not from the competition itself funnily enough?
    As far as the gym stuff coming back to hurt you in the long term again it all depends and isn’t that clear cut, I know several lifelong powerlifters who are still training (and in some cases competing) in their 60s and even 70s, yes they have some issues, such as limited overhead range of motion, elbow pains etc but who is to say this is a bad thing, when you compare them to the average 70 year old who cant even get out of a chair or walk without some kind of aid
    A physiotherapist I know who still lifts weights,, plays rugby and does martial arts in his mid 50s said the number one issue he sees in older patients is joint and muscle problems due to under use, he would rather they did resistance work that cardio work, in fact he took up weights when he turned 50 for that very reason
    Yeah I'm in my 30's, so not getting injured is becoming more of a priority. When I was younger I was really physically aggressive, and I think I'm lucky I didn't hurt myself. Most of the people I know that are injured are either dealing with old nagging injuries or they are younger and still going all out. I have no more interest in comps really. I just like to roll and stay in shape. I try to do as much of what I did when I was younger but it's a much different pace as I have other stuff to do too. Between gymnastics, bboyin and MA's I have a pretty good base, but I can feel it slowly slipping away as I prioritize more on non physical activities I'm involved in. Like, I don't run and jump into windmills anymore, I haven't done halos in like 5 years, can't remember the last time I did a series of backhandsprings etc etc.

    Powerlifting just isn't for me. I feel I can keep good shape w/o going there. I have no interest in being bulky like that, I just don't see the need. But that's me. If dudes wanna powerlift into their later years and are better for it, good for them, right? It's just in my experience, I see dudes prioritizing things that don't make sense to me. All my experience tells me that being well rounded is far better than being one dimensional. In fact, I can take that into most areas of life and it holds true. It's all anecdotal though, I'm sure there are many exceptions.

  10. #25
    Greetings,

    While I am visiting:

    Congratulations to the Wang Family!!!



    mickey

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Did your daughter train in martial arts for this, YouKnowWho?
    Not enough to be called TCMAist.
    http://johnswang.com

    More opinion -> more argument
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  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    Thanks, guys.



    Because I'm a left wing liberal.
    the purpose of outdated tcma is to carry the seed, the spirit to the next generation. you leave no legacy behind.
    Last edited by bawang; 12-14-2013 at 01:17 PM.

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

  13. #28

    Cool

    I like the idea of development of functional strength or body conditioning.

    Yes. The pole dancers use their arm strength to support their body weight and movement along the pole.

    It is for balance and performance.

    One can imagine that you may kick the opponents while your arms supporting your weight with the pole.

    There are moves when you use your staff to support while your kick.

    The same function of body use but for different purposes. One is to kick, while the other is to perform.

    There are many ways to use the pole to practice your MA.

    JW showed shuai jiao use of pole to practice arm and leg wrapping.

    We may think about striking the poles and standing on poles to practice MA.

    All are about balance and focus of posture and power.

    One is for performance. The other is to develop functional strength for fighting purpose.



    Teresa Deng from 1970s.



  14. #29


    The same song with Jazzified backgroud music.

    Yang yu ying 2011.

    We may do a similar move/song but with different purpose and focus/tune.

    That is.


  15. #30
    i still think its pretty weird john was openly proud of his daughter being pole dancing champion.

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

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