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Thread: Chin Na in BJJ

  1. #1

    Chin Na in BJJ


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  2. #2
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    I wouldn't give this a chin na title I would say this goes to the roots of BJJ from the JJ side.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonzbane76 View Post
    I wouldn't give this a chin na title I would say this goes to the roots of BJJ from the JJ side.
    Chin Na is not a style. It's just a general term for "joint locking".
    http://johnswang.com

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  4. #4
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    I'm surprised to hear that the wrist lock wasn't popular previously.

    That was one of the first things I went for the first time I rolled with a BJJ guy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    I'm surprised to hear that the wrist lock wasn't popular previously.

    That was one of the first things I went for the first time I rolled with a BJJ guy.
    Yesterday when I threw bag with someone in the park, one BJJ guy came over and said that seem like a good training to develop grip strength. It seems to me that BJJ guys start to pay more attention on "grip strength" now.
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  6. #6
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    Chin Na is not a style. It's just a general term for "joint locking".
    didn't say style. When inferred to "chin na" automatically its Chinese. I said for this guy it probably comes from his JJ roots in BJJ.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonzbane76 View Post
    didn't say style. When inferred to "chin na" automatically its Chinese.
    Actually, no. To Chinese speakers, and a lot of kung fu people, it's just any seizing and locking. I know some people may read this differently, based on their introduction to it I would imagine, but it is merely a work for seizing and locking. It doesn't presume a source, it is a descriptor. Also, it's a lot quicker to type than the alternatives.

  8. #8
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    I'm just saying generally speaking. "most" people.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i had an old taichi lady talk smack behind my back. i mean comon man, come on. if it was 200 years ago,, mebbe i wouldve smacked her and took all her monehs.
    Originally posted by Bawang
    i am manly and strong. do not insult me cracker.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by -N- View Post
    I'm surprised to hear that the wrist lock wasn't popular previously.

    That was one of the first things I went for the first time I rolled with a BJJ guy.
    To get to wrist locking, you have to grab, at least some semblance of it. Previous to that, you have to enter (adroitly) apply some level of feint, grab/redirect, trip, etc and depending on the others' strategy, adapt. Fresh on the ground locking is not a good idea unless the fellow is a legend in his own mind and he drop within 1 min. of the encounter. "Hitting' is good, some level of boxing (a western audience strategy) as you know! jus' sayin

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonzbane76 View Post
    I'm just saying generally speaking. "most" people.
    I dunno, do most english speaking kung fu folk read chin na that way? I just assumed otherwise, but that's just because of how I first learned it, it was a general term in most usages. Like, shuai jiao was definitely referencing chinese throws, but chin na was viewed as just seizing and locking, it didn't make a huge difference whose.

    I assumed that was the norm.

    And it's still quicker to type.

  11. #11
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    Shuai Jiao refers to an art form. "Shuai" is throwing, "Chi na" is lock and control.

  12. #12
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    One day a Karate guy asked me what did I train, I told him that I trained Kung Fu. He said, "You train Chinese Karate (the empty hands way)".
    http://johnswang.com

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  13. #13
    A lot of Karate schools borrow the term chin na...makes since, since they borrowed the art from China anyway...
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

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