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Thread: Into The Badlands

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  1. #1
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    Into The Badlands

    JUL 11
    AMC Orders Martial Arts Drama 'Badlands' Straight to Series
    4:34 PM PDT 7/11/2014 by Lesley Goldberg

    UPDATED: The drama hails from "Smallville" duo Al Gough and Miles Millar and marks their second straight-to-series order in a day.

    AMC is adding to its drama roster.

    The cable network on Friday announced a straight-to-series pickup for martial arts drama Badlands.

    Badlands is described as a genre-bending martial arts series very loosely based on the classic Chinese tale Journey to the West. In a land controlled by feudal barons, Badlands tells the story of a great warrior and a young boy who embark on a journey across a dangerous land to find enlightenment.

    The home of Mad Men and The Walking Dead has ordered six hourlong episodes of the drama from AMC Studios for a premiere in late 2015 or 2016. The drama was created by writers-showrunners Al Gough and Miles Millar (Smallville), who will exec produce alongside Stacey Sher and Michael Shamberg (Pulp Fiction) and martial arts filmmakers Daniel Wu (Tai Chi Zero) and Stephen Fung. Entertainment One will handle international distribution.

    Badlands becomes AMC's third show picked up straight to series at the network, joining Breaking Bad prequel Better Call Saul and ratings hit The Walking Dead.

    "We are incredibly excited to help Al and Miles, as well as Stacey and Michael from Double Feature to bring Badlands to life,” said AMC exec vp original programming Joel Stillerman. "This creative team has so much expertise in bringing a fresh take to classic genres from their film and television experience, and their take on martial arts will be no exception. Along with a beautiful story, they've also assembled the A-Team of martial arts fight choreography in Daniel Wu and Stephen Fung."

    For AMC, Badlands comes at a good time for the network, which has seen its latest two original scripted dramas — Turn and Halt and Catch Fire — stumble out of the gate. While Revolutionary War drama Turn was renewed for a second season, a decision on critical darling but ratings underperformer Halt has yet to be made. Neither series has broken through in a major way as AMC looks to replace Breaking Bad and the exiting Mad Men.

    Badlands joins a scripted roster that also includes veteran Hell on Wheels and dramas Knifeman, Galyntine and We Hate Paul Revere, the latter three of which are in the pilot stage. The network also is working on a Walking Dead companion series, which it is also eyeing for 2015.

    For Gough and Millar, Badlands becomes their second series on the air and the second one ordered on Friday. The pickup comes just hours after MTV ordered its adaptation of Shannara — also a straight to series addition — with a 10-episode commitment.
    Hmm. I don't have AMC.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #2
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    A little more

    WSJ blog discussing the ramifications...
    7:11 pm HKT
    Jul 14, 2014
    Culture
    AMC’s Successor to Don Draper: The Monkey King


    A monkey dressed as a character from Journey to the West is pictured at a zoo in Shenyang, Liaoning province on May 10, 2014.
    Reuters

    Can viewers suffering from “Mad Men” withdrawal seek solace in a 16th-century Chinese fable? U.S. television network AMC AMCX +0.61% hopes so.

    The cable network announced Friday that it plans to produce six, one-hour episodes loosely based on the Journey to the West, a famed Chinese tale in which a ragtag group of adventurers including a monkey with supernatural powers and a creature who’s half human, half pig travel west to procure a set of holy scriptures. The martial arts drama will be titled “Badlands” and is slated for a late 2015 or early 2016 premiere.

    The series’ title may conjure up images of Martin Sheen in Terrence Malik’s 1973 film of the same name, but this version of “Badlands” will tell “the story of a warrior and a young boy who travel across a dangerous land controlled by feudal barons to find enlightenment,” said AMC. The cable network said the show will be created by Al Gough and Miles Millar in partnership with Stacy Sher of Pulp Fiction, Michael Shamberg of Contagion and master martial arts filmmakers Stephen Fung and Daniel Wu.

    AMC, fresh off its smash hit “Mad Men,” a drama chronicling the lives of employees at a 1950s ad agency, said it hopes “Badlands” can replicate that show’s success. “This creative team has so much expertise in bringing a fresh take to classic genres from their film and television experience, and their take on martial arts will be no exception,” said Joel Stillerman, AMC’s executive vice president of original programming, production and digital content.

    While executives don’t say they’re trying to tap into the Chinese market with the new series, there’s a chance they might. The fact that Journey of the West is coming to U.S. television screens has been widely circulated on Chinese social media, where thousands of people have left comments, many lauding the news.

    Some Chinese commentators on Monday were skeptical, saying that the series would surely to fail in attempting to capture the magic of Journey to the West, a tale that’s standard childhood fare in China.

    Chinese viewers have been burned before. The original TV series “Journey to the West” was broadcast on China’s Central Television network in 1986 and has been remade countless times since. Many versions of the tale have sputtered amid poor special effects, bad costuming and cheesy dialogue. One version that aired on the Hong Kong station TVB earlier this year received a record 1,100 complaints, with viewers scoffing at the production quality and saying the choice of the show was too dated.

    The “Badlands” storyline isn’t expected to exactly mirror the plot of the old fable. But some Chinese viewers don’t seem to mind new takes on the old story. A 3D movie version, Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons, pulled in $196.7 million in China last year.

    – Laurie Burkitt and Te-Ping Chen
    Gene Ching
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    I truly hope this is will come

    We have threads on Arrow, Daredevil (needs update), Iron Fist, & Luke Cage (which I'm just starting now as an independent thread) but I felt this one needed the most luv because it's mentioned in the upcoming NOV+DEC 2014 issue

    Variety actually missed two more: Marco Polo and Kingdom (another one which I'm just starting now).

    Why Martial Arts Might Be the Next Big TV Trend


    September 17, 2014 | 10:07AM PT
    Whitney Friedlander
    News Editor @loislane79

    Forget kryptonite. The real killer for the superhero TV genre might be oversaturation.

    Geoff Johns, CCO of DC Entertainment, is aware of this risk and is battling it through a diversification plan. This fall, the Warner Bros.-backed company will have four shows on three networks. It also has a fifth, the quirky, femme-skewing “iZombie,” in the warmer for the midseason on the CW.

    “We’re creating this DC Universe world and introducing these DC heroes that we haven’t even gotten to talk about yet,” Johns says. “If you look at the shows we’re developing this season with Warner Brothers and all the networks, you can see they are all very different… Diversity in the properties and the tones and the shows is really important because there’s a huge audience out there and we want to have stuff for everybody. That goes from film to comics to games to TV shows.”

    While this strategy has been successful with, say, financial advisers for generations, the key for television trends is in their ability to morph into the next big thing. This time, the emerging genre may be martial arts, since intense fight sequences are already a major part of many comicbook shows.

    As fans of the CW’s “Arrow” know, DC character Oliver Queen was trained in a number of combat practices during his time on a remote island. The leads in Marvel’s Netflix properties “Daredevil” and “Iron Fist” also possess these skills, while the netcaster’s “Luke Cage” series focuses on a street fighter.

    AMC has a different take on this trend, as the basic cabler has ordered martial arts drama “Badlands” straight to series. Although the show is based on the classic Chinese story “Journey to the West,” this is only time AMC has made such a commitment to a project that didn’t have a preexisting fanbase (unlike “The Walking Dead,” an adaptation of Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore’s popular Image Comics series, and “Breaking Bad” spinoff “Better Call Saul”).

    Al Gough, who co-created and is showrunning “Badlands” with partner Miles Millar, said martial arts speaks to the visual and visceral components of television, plus “it’s something that’s not on TV right now … also, it’s something you can actually do week-to-week. It’s something that looks great and is highly visual.”

    “I think there’s a great variety of martial arts that you can call on,” he says, adding, “oftentimes it’s a fight that comes down to two characters, and television has an intimacy that really lends itself to that.”

    Gough and Miller know a thing or two about being on the forefront of a TV trend — they also created the long-running Superman origin series “Smallville” for the WB/CW. Gough acknowledges that there’s “obviously an appetite for those shows,” but they’re now a lot more ubiquitous than when “Smallville” premiered in 2001.

    He wonders if special effects and flash are getting to be too much for audiences, predicting that “audiences want to get back to something that feels real and is very tactile and involves characters; not avatars.”
    Gene Ching
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    Dobkin ups the ante

    I trust you all read my Chollywood Rising column: Interview with Daniel Wu from our NOV+DEC 2014 issue.

    David Dobkin Boards AMC’s Martial Arts Drama Badlands

    BADLANDS BY SILAS LESNICK ON NOVEMBER 24, 2014



    David Dobkin, the director behind films like Clay Pigeons, Wedding Crashers, Shanghai Knights and, most recently, the Robert Downey Jr.-led The Judge, is set to serve as both series director and executive producer on AMC’s upcoming martial arts drama “Badlands.” What’s more, Emily Beecham (28 Weeks Later, The Village), Sarah Bolger (“The Tudors,” In America) and Oliver Stark (The Adventurer: The Curse of the Midas Box, My Hero) have joined the cast as series regulars.

    “Badlands” is said to be a genre-bending martial arts series very loosely based on the classic Chinese tale “Journey to the West.” In a land controlled by feudal barons, the series tells the story of a great warrior and a young boy who embark on a journey across a dangerous land to find enlightenment.

    AMC has ordered six, one-hour episodes, with an expected premiere in late 2015 or early 2016. The project was created by writers/show runners Al Gough and Miles Millar (Shanghai Noon, “Smallville”). They’ll serve as executive producers along with Oscar-Nominated producers Stacy Sher and Michael Shamberg (Pulp Fiction, Contagion) and master martial arts filmmakers Daniel Wu (Tai Chi Zero) and Stephen Fung.

    “I am thrilled to be directing ‘Badlands,’” Dobkin said, “Aside from the amazing group of people I get to work with – everyone at AMC, plus Stacy and Michael, and Al and Miles for the second time – it’s a brilliant, visionary project that finally gives the fan-boy in me something to dig my teeth into.”

    From AMC Studios, “Badlands” will be distributed internationally by Entertainment One Television (eOne).

    (Photo Credit: FayesVision.com / WENN.com)
    Gene Ching
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    I was wondering if this was headed this way...

    If you haven't read it yet, check out my interview with Daniel Wu in the last issue (NOV+DEC 2014).

    DEC 19
    AMC's 'Badlands' Casts Its Lead
    10:37 AM PST 12/19/2014 by Lesley Goldberg

    International star Daniel Wu will topline the martial arts drama


    AP Images

    AMC's Badlands has cast its lead.

    International film star Daniel Wu — who was already attached to the drama as an exec producer — will topline the martial arts drama, AMC announced Friday.

    Badlands is described as a genre-bending martial arts series very loosely based on the classic Chinese tale Journey to the West. In a land controlled by feudal barons, Badlands tells the story of a ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny (Wu) and a young boy who embark on a journey across a dangerous land to find enlightenment.

    Read more AMC Orders Martial Arts Drama 'Badlands' Straight to Series

    Wu joins a cast that also includes Emily Beecham (28 Weeks Later, The Village), Sarah Bolger (The Tudors) and Oliver Stark (The Adventurer: The Curse of the Midas Box).

    The drama was created by writer-showrunners Al Gough and Miles Millar (Smallville), who will exec produce alongside Stacey Sher and Michael Shamberg (Pulp Fiction) and martial arts filmmakers Wu (Tai Chi Zero) and Stephen Fung. Entertainment One will handle international distribution. David Dobkin (Shanghai Knights) will be the series director.

    Wu has been featured in more than 60 films including City of Glass and The Heavenly Kings, the latter of which marked his directorial debut and earned him a best director Chinese Film Media Award.

    AMC has ordered six hourlong episodes of Badlands, with a premiere targeted for late 2015 or early 2016.

    Wu is repped by CAA.

    Email: Lesley.Goldberg@THR.com
    Twitter: @Snoodit
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    Orla Brady

    Orla Brady Joins ‘Badlands'; Christina Jackson In ‘Outsiders’
    by The Deadline Team
    January 22, 2015 3:46pm



    Irish actress Orla Brady (Wallander) has landed a lead role in AMC’s direct-to-series martial arts drama Badlands, loosely based on the Chinese tale Journey To The West. In a land controlled by feudal barons, Badlands tells the story of a ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny (Daniel Wu) and a young boy who embark on a journey across a dangerous land to find enlightenment. Brady, repped by Domain and Independent Talent Group, will play Lydia, Quinn’s first wife, the Baroness who runs her domain with an iron grip. Brady most recently starred in the detective series Jo for TFI. She also starred in the British television series Mistresses, that the ABC series is based on.

    Christina Jackson (Boardwalk Empire) has been cast in WGN America’s drama series Outsiders, a tale of struggle for power and control in the hills of Appalachia, from playwright Peter Mattei, producers Peter Tolan and Paul Giamatti, Sony Pictures TV and Tribune Studios. It tells the story of the Farrell clan, a family of outsiders who’ve been in these parts since before anyone can remember. Living off the grid and above the law on their mountaintop homestead, they’ll protect their world and defend their way of life using any means necessary. Jackson will play Sally-Ann, whose fascination with the Farrell clan and Hail (Kyle Gallner) will have powerful consequences.
    So she's like Princess Iron Fan or what?
    Gene Ching
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    Iron Fist vs. Into the Badlands (aka Netflix vs. AMC)

    Looks like Iron Fist is poaching from Into The Badlands.

    Iron Fist Episode Titles Inspired By Shaolin Kung Fu Moves
    January 23, 2017 Dave Golder



    Bleeding Cool has spotted on the BBFC website that the British Board Of Film Censors is currently rating the episodes of Netflix’s Marvel’s Iron Fist and revealing most of the series’ episode titles and directors in the process.
    A lot of the episode titles themselves appear to be based in moves used in Shaolin Kung Fu, though on a more metaphorical level they could also possibly be spoilery as well.
    1: Snow Gives Way (dir. John Dahl)
    2: Shadow Hawk Takes Flight (dir. John Dahl)
    3: Rolling Thunder Cannon Punch (dir. Tom Shankland)
    4: Eight Diagram Dragon Palm
    5: Under Leaf Pluck Lotus (dir. Uta Briesewitz)
    6: Immortal Emerges From Cave
    7: Felling With Tree Routes (dir. Farren Blackburn)
    8: The Blessing Of Many Fractures (dir. Kevin Tancharoen)
    9: The Mistress Of All Agonies (dir. Jet Wilkinson)
    10: Unlisted
    11: Lead Horse Back To Stable (dir. Deborah Chow)
    12: Unlisted
    13: Dragon Plays With Fire (dir. Stephen Surjik)
    Iron Fist debuts on Netflix on 17 March.
    Into The Badlands Season 2 premieres March 19.
    Gene Ching
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    Chinese news coverage

    巨星吴彦祖将出席武术名师 5月加州湾区论剑!
    http://news.sina.com 2017年05月10日 14:25 北美新浪网
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    美国功夫太极杂志社为庆祝创刊25週年特別举行盛大庆典活动, 定于2017年5月19日晚上7:00PM在圣荷西历史悠久的加州剧场(California Theater, 345 S. First St., San Jose)盛大推出 “武术名师表演- Grandmasters' LIVE!”。表演大师们是来自世界各地代表中国功夫各派拳种的顶尖高手,是自1992至2017年25年 期间驰聘世界武坛极具影响力的代表人物,因而特邀登上美国功夫太极杂志的封面:他们是不同拳种或门派的创始 人,掌门人,中国武术界最高段位九段大师们,功夫电影巨星或其高徒,世界武术和太极拳冠军们。参加表演的拳 种有少林,武当,太极,峨嵋,咏春,鹰爪,蔡李佛,青城,99神功,华林寺, 周家,侠家,马家,杨氏武艺, 及国际散手道等。还有精彩绝伦的团体表演难得一见:包括由北加州湾区16名少林学校校长及教练们担纲演出的 “少林寺打山门” (按少林寺规矩,还俗下山必须打赢过18铜人此谓打山门),国际武术散手道联盟加拿大代表团,历届Wild Aid虎爪精英冠军等。这将是一场汇集中华武术各派最高级別的演出,一场纯正的中国传统文化的盛宴,可以亲 眼目睹大师风范和名星风采的千载难逢的机会!表演门票为$40美金。贵宾票$100美金 (包括贵宾区座位及表演前一小时进场与大师合影及簽名的机会)。门票有限,请提早订购,勿失良机 。

    ** 节目精采,难得一睹各武林太极大师高手们真功夫表演!附上节目表,内容丰富,加州剧场高级舞台设备,声光音 效高品质,座位宽敞舒适,顶级享受。

    最新消息:巨星吴彦祖将出席星期五晚的 “Grandmasters' LIVE!", 将会与观众互动。吴生于加州伯克莱,从小习武,为功夫太极杂志2016年二月的封面人物。1994在读俄勒 冈大学时,成立该校的武术俱乐部并担任教练。

    Media Contact: Gigi Oh, Publisher of Kung Fu Tai Chi Magazine & www.Kungfumagazine.com(Tel# 408-209-8150, gigitcmedia@hotmail.com )

    On-line: http://www.kungfumagazine.com/info/t...TC25Live.html;

    ** 10 张以上打折, $35 一张:Call Gigi at 510-656-5100 x 141 , Jeff Lin @ 408-668-8868


    googtrans (FYI Wu Yanzu is Daniel Wu)
    Superstar Wu Yanzu will attend the martial arts teacher in May California Bay Area sword!
    Http://news.sina.com 2017 年 10 月 10 日 14:25 North America Sina.com
    share to

    The United States Kung Fu Tai Chi magazine to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the launch of a grand celebration, scheduled for May 19, 2017 at 7:00 pm in San Jose's historic California theater (California Theater, 345 S. First St., San Jose "Grand launch" martial arts teacher performance - Grandmasters' LIVE! ". Performing masters are from around the world on behalf of the Chinese martial arts factions of the top masters, from 1992 to 2017 during the 25 years of the world's most influential representatives of the martial arts, and therefore invited to the United States Kung Fu Tai Chi magazine Cover: They are the founder of different boxing or martial art, the head of the Chinese martial arts sector, the highest segment of the nine masters, Kung Fu movie stars or their high school, world martial arts and tai chi champion. To participate in the performance of the boxing boxing Shaolin, Wudang, Tai Chi, Emei, Wing Chun, eagle claw, Cai Lifo, Qingcheng, 99 magic, Hualin Temple, Zhou, Xiajia, Ma, Yang martial arts, The There are wonderful group performances rare: including by the North California Bay District 16 Shaolin school principals and coaches featuring performances "Shaolin Temple mountain" (according to Shaolin Temple rules, but also down the mountain must win over 18 copper people that call Mountain gate), the international Wushu Sutra Union Canada delegation, previous WildAid Tiger Pants elite champion. This will be a collection of Chinese martial arts factions of the highest level of performance, a pure Chinese traditional culture feast, you can witness the master style and celebrity style of the golden opportunity! Show tickets for $ 40 dollars. VIP tickets $ 100 (including VIP seats and one hour before the show with the master photo and signature opportunities). Tickets are limited, please order early, missed opportunities.

    ** program is wonderful, rare to see the martial arts tai chi master master who really kung fu performances! Attached to the program table, rich in content, California theater advanced stage equipment, sound and sound sound high quality, spacious and comfortable seat, top enjoyment.

    Latest News: Superstar Wu Yanzu will attend the "Grandmasters' LIVE!" On Friday night, will interact with the audience. Wu Sheng in California Berkeley, from the small martial arts, for the Kung Fu Tai Chi magazine February 2016 cover characters. 1994 When he was studying at the University of Oregon, he set up the martial arts club and served as a coach.

    Media Contact: Gigi Oh, Publisher of Kung Fu Tai Chi Magazine & www.Kungfumagazine.com (Tel # 408-209-8150, gigitcmedia@hotmail.com)

    On-line: http://www.kungfumagazine.com/info/t...TC25Live.html;

    ** More than 10 discounts, $ 35 one: Call Gigi at 510-656-5100 x 141, Jeff Lin @ 408-668-8868
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    My final article on Season 2

    Daniel Wu will be a special guest for Grandmasters LIVE! This Friday May at the California Theater in San Jose, CA.

    Read INTO THE BADLANDS: Daniel Wu on the Sunny Side of Life by Gene Ching.


    TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE HERE.


    This is my final installment of my INTO THE BADLANDS coverage - the Season 2 Finale immediately follows KFTC25 AF and the MAY+JUNE issue comes off newsstands soon after.
    Gene Ching
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    The Bamboo Ceiling



    Daniel Wu Breaks The Bamboo Ceiling
    KC YAP | MAY 11, 2017

    Pictures by Sarah Dunn; words by Farhan Shah; grooming by Garen Tolkin for exclusive artists using V76 by Vaughn & Bare Escentuals, assisted by Nick Tooman, Jonathan Folds, Jimmy Fikes & Justin Schaefers.

    It’s five minutes to eight in the morning and I’m sitting in the conference room at the office, waiting for the phone to ring. Just the night before, I had binged on dozens of YouTube clips until my eyebags had their own eyebags. But it was all for work, of course. I was getting up to speed on Daniel Wu’s latest project, a martial arts television series called Into the Badlands. It’s visceral, bloody and very much in your face, so I don’t imagine it’s going to be aired in (currently on AXN) without first getting its guts and heart ripped out by our country’s rather zealous censorship board, but it makes for interesting viewing.

    The phone rings exactly at 8am. Surprising punctuality from a star, I muse while picking it up. Daniel Wu is on the other end of the line. He’s back home in Oakland, residence of the Golden State Warriors basketball team of which Wu is a massive fan. We exchange pleasantries. He seems fresh, even happy to be talking to me. I look at my list of questions and scratch out the one about Steph Curry and gang failing spectacularly at the 2016 NBA Finals. I couldn’t bear to do it to Wu.

    “Why are you back home?” I ask instead.

    “Oh, just in the middle of doing all the press interviews for Into the Badlands. I’m heading off in about a week to finish the filming of Tomb Raider. We have about a month more of filming to go for that.”

    Wu is experiencing an acting Renaissance of sorts in Hollywood. Besides Tomb Raider, which is expected to be out in 2018, Wu also has a small but critical role in Geostorm, playing a scientist who discovers the reason why the satellites are destroying Earth. “That film is interesting because I’m playing a character that is totally different from anything that most people know me for."

    “I am a nerdy guy, not the one kicking ass,” Wu laughs.


    Jacket by Guess Jeans; shirt & trousers by Fendi; Vanguard Carbon watch in carbon fibre case with nylon strap by Franck Muller. (Above) Jumper by Fendi; shirt by Guess Jeans & jeans by Acne; Vanguard Carbon watch in carbon fibre case with nylon strap by Franck Muller.

    THE MOST HARDWORKING MAN IN HOLLYWOOD

    “Kicking ass” is what Wu has been doing for close to two decades. He’s starred in over 60 films, two television series and multiple commercials. That’s a lot of work. But he admits that, as he grows older, the way he selects projects has changed as well.

    “In the past I used to be more ambitious about wanting to choose award-winning roles. But I slowly realised that as an actor, you’re very passive to the whole process. You cannot control what happens in the end. A lot of times, you put a lot of hopes and dreams into one project and it doesn’t turn out the way you think it would. It’s disheartening,” the 43-year-old shares.

    Now, the American-Chinese actor chooses to fit the filming schedule around his family’s needs. The project must be extremely compelling for him to want to do it. For Tomb Raider, it was because he wanted to work alongside Alicia Vikander. “I fell in love with her in Ex Machina. I thought she was great and I was telling myself that I really want to work with this girl.”

    Into the Badlands was another kind of opportunity. Wu saw a chance to fill a void on the small screen. He wanted to translate the big-budget fighting sequences you typically saw in cinemas into the medium of television. There are two reasons why no one has done it. One was the money. Secondly, the tight filming schedule typical of a television series meant that fight choreography had to be short and snappy.

    Wu’s solution was simple and solved both problems―bring in his own team from Hong Kong, who is used to working on a smaller budget and on a short timeline.

    The show’s first season was a great hit. Viewers loved the action. What Wu didn’t anticipate were the huge cultural waves the show made. There was the fact that an Asian male, Wu himself, was the lead. More importantly, Wu had a legitimate romantic interest. And even made out with her.


    Shirty by Levi's; jeans by Dior Homme; Vanguard Chronograph in polished steel by Franck Muller.

    THE RISE OF THE ASIAN MALE

    It is startlingly rare for an Asian character to be seen romancing another character in the American entertainment universe. The New York Times op-ed, funnyman Aziz Ansari could only come up with two instances that an Asian man kissed someone in television and film―Steven Yuen in The Walking Dead and Daniel Dae Kim in Lost.

    “For many years, the Asian male has been emasculated in American culture. Roles like mine help to change that. When the show came out, we had support from all over America―black Americans, Asian Americans, even Hispanic Americans. I was proud of it, especially since the last time you saw an Asian man and a black woman on television together was in Romeo Must Die with Jet Li and the late Aaliyah. But they only hugged in the end, and that was it,” says Wu, laughing.

    “Daniel Dae Kim once told me the true test of whether Asians have made it in Hollywood is when an Asian is the lead actor in a successful rom-com,” I put forward. The reasoning behind this is simple. If the film is financially successful, it means that the audience is comfortable and willing to pay to watch an Asian protagonist win the heart of his female co-star.

    “Absolutely,” Wu agrees. I can practically see him nodding his head somewhere in Oakland. “It’s a role most people don’t think of for an Asian male simply because it’s not in the American psyche. As the audience, we must create that demand because honestly, Hollywood just goes where the money is. And right now, the Asian American audience is very vocal.”

    He pauses.

    “Truthfully, they might be a bit too vocal, a little over the top,” he says, half-jokingly. “I think cultural appropriation is a bullsh*t thing to call out because it’s like saying that only Asians can do martial arts or only black people can play basketball and rap.”

    Wu proposes that diversity in entertainment is inevitable as the world becomes more globalised, and it makes sense. The older head honchos are handing over the reins to a younger generation who grew up in more diverse environments. These are people who have travelled, interacted with different people and realised that the world isn’t just shades of white.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  11. #11
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    Continued from previous post


    Shirt by Levi's; jeans by Dior Homme; shoes by Louboutin; Vanguard Chronograph timepiece in brushed stainless steel by Franck Muller.

    ACTOR, ARCHITECT, ASIAN DAD

    Wu and I have been chatting for close to 30 minutes now, talking at length about Hollywood and its foibles, his preference for the Hong Kong film industry and the reasons behind it, his disdain for generic superhero films, and even his love for design.

    For the record, Wu studied architecture for five years―he graduated in the top 10% of his class―before becoming a thespian. He still loves the world of design and was devastated when Zaha Hadid passed away. But he remains private about his creative side for one reason: Kanye West.

    “I could be a multi-hyphenate but I don’t want to because people have associated that with Kanye West. He’s ruined it for everybody,” Wu says, laughing boisterously. “Sure, he does some cool things design-wise but he’s not a genius. He’s no Marc Newson.” A beat.

    “Or even Marc Jacobs.” Chuckles.

    But what I really want to know about is how he is like with his family behind closed doors. We generally put celebrities like Wu on pedestals and hold them to a higher standard, as though they are impervious to any of life’s curveballs.

    Wu, I find, is not much unlike you and I. He has his insecurities. He peppers his speech with curse words. He is trying hard to cut sugar out of his diet but loves iced lemon tea too much. He hates plain water. He works out four days a week. And he wants to be the best possible father he can be to his four-year-old daughter, Raven.

    “I’m beginning to be like my own father. The stuff I hated hearing from my dad, I’m now saying to Raven,” Wu says. “There are many aspects of my upbringing that made me who I am today so I am trying to transfer that to my daughter. You should be physically and mentally present. I don’t want to be that dad at the playground looking at crap on his phone while his daughter is playing. I see those fathers all the time.”

    Wu tells me about an episode in Malaysia. He was at the mall with Raven and his wife Lisa S when he saw a family of four―mother, father and two kids―at a restaurant. The dishes were on the table. But only the father was eating. The remaining three were on their phones, “God knows doing what”. There was no conversation, only the swish of thumbs on digital keypads and the occasional clanking of the father’s fork against his plate.

    He nudged Lisa and pointed at the family. “I told her, ‘We will never end up like that family.’ We make a conscious effort to engage and be with each other.”

    That includes limiting the amount of screen time Raven is exposed to. Wu only occasionally takes the iPad out of cold storage for Raven on long-haul flights or as a reward. “I think the iPad is an easy way out. The problem is that parenting now seems to be about shoving something in front of a child’s face to entertain them or keep them busy. Kids should be playing outside to foster their creative minds instead of staying indoors and staring at a screen all the time.”

    THE FIRST CHINESE AMERICAN PRESIDENT

    And then we veer off on another tangent, this time about Wu’s mother. I suppose that’s how a creative mind works, in zigs and zags, with no purpose in sight, merely the pleasure the journey afforded.

    Apparently, the late Madam Wu was slightly sad that Raven was born in Hong Kong instead of the US. “She thought that meant Raven couldn’t be the president of the United States until she found out that that you’re still an American citizen even if you were born overseas as long as you have an American parent.”

    It was a long-running joke that started with Wu, the first member of the clan to be born on American soil. His mum used to tell him that he could be the first Chinese president of the United States and for the first decade of his life, he thought he could.

    Now, he would never wish the crown upon his daughter’s head. “Look at Barack Obama. Do you remember how he looked like before he became the most powerful man on Earth? His whole head is grey now. Nobody in that position ever has a good time,” Wu laughs.

    It’s hard to imagine but Obama is only a decade older than Wu. Perhaps it’s the Asian genes or perhaps it’s his disdain for taking on the presidential role, but Wu looks no different than when he first started out in 1998 in the film Bishonen after being casted on the strength of a clothing advertisement.

    Sure, the eyes have gained the thousand-yard stare one acquires from experience and the hairline might have crept up a little higher but those dreamy eyes and strong jawline from his youth are still there.

    And the hair remains as black as ever.

    Get a copy of August Man Malaysia, May 2017 for the complete spread.
    Great article from Augustman on Into The Badlands star Daniel Wu. He'll be our special guest at Grandmasters LIVE!, our cover masters demo for KFTC25 AF.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  12. #12
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    In general, I like the show and the choreography....but the finale was annoying....

    First, I am not a fan of the two sai vs. whatever sets.... It just never did much for me....but that aside...

    So, excuse the spellings... Bajie gets almost done in - because he ASSUMED the enemy was dead and turned his back on him....

    Why do they ALWAYS do that... It is so simple to make sure.... after all, they went in to kill them and they KNEW that they were going to be killed if possible. A simple check would have taken ZERO time...but not let the character pass out at the end...

    And then, Sonny.... does the EXACT SAME THING with Quinn...... REALLY....could they not afford better writers. Even a musical fugue has variation....

  13. #13
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    5-0 up

    Curt Into the Badlands reference in more of the 5-0 story on our yellow face/white washing thread. Interested to see what Kim and Park might say eventually, but I do respect them playing it cool by being quiet about this so far.

    In Hollywood, Asian American actors see few lead roles, and pay discrepancies when they land one


    Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park have quit the CBS show "Hawaii Five-0" in a dispute over claims they were paid less than their white counterparts. Pictured are Scott Caan, left, Alex O'Loughlin, Park, Kim and Chi McBride. (CBS Photo Archive / CBS via Getty Images)

    Meg James and David Ng

    Korean American actor Edward Hong has played characters in dozens of TV shows and movies over the years, including as “Math Olympian Dude,” “Chinese Man #2” and, in a top-rated network sitcom, “Male Night Nurse.”

    Soon, he will appear in the independent film “Please Stand By” as the “Cinnabon Guy.”

    “In Hollywood, there are a lot of opportunities, but it is always for small roles with one-liners,” Hong said in an interview. “If you want to be a store owner, the nail salon lady or the IT-tech guy, those are the parts, but rarely do we get a chance to be the main character.”

    He’s not bitter, he said, just realistic about the plight of being an Asian American actor in Hollywood.

    Decades of racist caricatures — think Mickey Rooney playing the buck-toothed Mr. Yunioshi in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” — have given way to an industry that is more inclusive, but where leading roles remain scarce. This week served as a stark reminder that even those who have reached some of the highest levels in the entertainment industry still face obstacles. Two prominent actors — Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park — quit CBS’ “Hawaii Five-0” amid claims they were paid less than their white counterparts.

    The controversy has motivated actors to be more vocal about what they say have been decades of inequities.

    “The path to equality is rarely easy,” Kim wrote in a message on Facebook, thanking fans for supporting him on “Hawaii Five-0.”

    Two years after the #OscarsSoWhite campaign shined a harsh light on Hollywood’s hiring and casting practices, some progress has been made. The film and TV industries have shown a heightened awareness of diversity and greenlighted more films with diverse casts. Television programs headlined by minorities, such as Fox’s “Empire” and ABC’s “black-ish,” have turned in strong ratings performances. Netflix’s “Master of None” stars the popular comedian Aziz Ansari, whose parents emigrated from India.

    There are few other Asian Americans in leading roles beyond ABC’s “Fresh Off the Boat,” loosely based around the experiences of an Asian immigrant family in the 1980s, ABC’s “Designated Survivor,” which depicts a determined FBI agent played by Maggie Q and AMC's martial arts drama “Into the Badlands,” which stars Daniel Wu as a talented warrior.


    Grace Park, left, and Daniel Dae Kim quit CBS' "Hawaii Five-0" amid claims of pay inequity. CBS says both were offered "significant salary increases." (CBS Photo Archive / CBS via Getty Images)

    But problems persist, particularly for Asian Americans. Filmmakers have tried to fend off charges of “whitewashing” even as they continue to rely on white actors to portray Asians on screen. Netflix’s upcoming adaptation of a Japanese manga, “Death Note,” stirred controversy when a producer, in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, said the production searched for Asian actors but “couldn’t find the right person,” in large part because actors from Asia “didn’t speak the perfect English.”

    That came after an outcry over Scarlett Johansson’s casting as the heroine in “Ghost in the Shell,” this year’s remake of a classic Japanese anime. In Marvel’s “Doctor Strange” last year, Tilda Swinton played the Ancient One, a character that is an Asian man in the original comics. Even the starring role in the big-budget Chinese period action film “The Great Wall” went to Matt Damon.

    “There is a bias against Asian Americans,” said Nancy Wang Yuen, a sociology professor at Biola University who studies race and ethnicity in film and television. “I feel like we are invisible in society. We are nondescript and in a way dehumanized by not existing in scenes or having speaking roles. We are just part of the backdrop.”

    Asian actors have been getting more work these days, in large part because of the flow of money from China. Movie studio executives hoping to enhance a film’s financial prospects in China, the world’s second-largest film market, have rounded out their casts with Asian faces. But those are often background roles.

    “The Chinese actors say: ‘We are just flower vases. We don’t speak; we just stand there and look pretty,’ ” Hong said.
    Asian Americans say they face unique challenges because of ingrained stereotypes, including a perception that Asians are not complainers and thus will show up and dutifully do the work. “We are always the model minority,” Hong said.

    The Chinese actors say: ‘We are just flower vases. We don’t speak; we just stand there and look pretty,’ ”
    — Edward Hong, Korean-American actor
    Several people interviewed said part of the problem is that Asians don’t fit the studio chiefs’ vision of a leading man.

    “I don’t believe people in showbiz are inherently racist,” said Christine Toy Johnson, a New York-based actress who has a recurring role on FX’s “The Americans” and recently appeared in guest spots on CBS’ “Madam Secretary” and USA’s “Mr. Robot.”

    “There are different lenses with which we see things,” she said.

    Ren Hanami, chairwoman of the SAG-AFTRA guild’s Asian Pacific American Media Committee, said she believes the problem is “systemic.”

    “Most of the heads of studios are white men, and there will be some women and people of color,” Hanami said. “And then you have the creators of the show — most come from writing and Ivy League schools. All the people making those decisions are writing about themselves.”

    USC’s Media, Diversity and Social Change Initiative last year found that just 28.3% of all speaking characters were from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups — a much lower percentage than the population at large. Asian Americans were particularly invisible. At least half of movies and TV shows, including on streaming services, “fail to portray one speaking or named Asian or Asian American on screen,” the USC report found.

    Hollywood executives are “still stuck in a mid-20th century mindset,” said Chris Tashima, an L.A.-based actor and Oscar-winning short-film maker. “It’s the default for the creators of content to think ‘white’ when they’re thinking of stars.”

    “Why aren’t there any Asian American stars? You need to cast the person for it to happen,” Tashima said.

    CBS has been blistered by criticism before for its formula of casting white men in lead roles, then building shows around them. Although “Hawaii Five-0” boasts a large and diverse cast, the network considered Kim and Park supporting actors to the show’s two white leading men, Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan.

    Both had major acting credits before landing their parts on “Hawaii Five-0,” a 2010 reboot of the popular 1960s detective show that consistently ranks in the top 20 in ratings. Kim was a fan favorite on ABC’s “Lost,” and Park, a Canadian actress, was a main character on “Battlestar Galactica.”

    “CBS promoted ‘Hawaii Five-0’ from the outset as an ensemble show with four co-stars, and it was clear that the two Asian American co-stars played absolutely crucial roles in the series,” said Daniel Mayeda, an entertainment attorney at Leopold, Petrich & Smith. “Without them, there is little to distinguish ‘Hawaii Five-0’ from any other cop show on the air.”
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  14. #14
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    Continued from previous post


    CBS considered Kim and Park supporting actors to the show’s two white leading men, Scott Caan, left, and Alex O’Loughlin. (CBS Photo Archive / CBS via Getty Images)

    Contract renegotiations stalled this spring when the television studio, CBS Productions, tried to lock in deals to bring the actors back for the show’s eighth season, which begins production next week. Both refused after being offered less money per episode than O’Loughlin and Caan.

    This week, CBS and producers rejected the notion that Kim and Park were treated unfairly. Kim, for example, was offered a huge jump in salary — to about $195,000 an episode, which was $5,000 an episode less than what Caan and O’Loughlin receive, according to a person close to the production who was not authorized to divulge details of the sensitive negotiations. Kim also was offered a new production deal on CBS’ lot in Studio City. His pay before the offer is not known.

    “Daniel and Grace have been important and valued members of ‘Hawaii Five-0’ for seven seasons,” CBS said in a statement. “We did not want to lose them and tried very hard to keep them with offers for large and significant salary increases.”

    Kim and Park declined to comment.

    Peter Lenkov, co-creator and executive producer of “Hawaii Five-0,” on Thursday stressed that the show was proud of its large and inclusive cast.

    “The truth is this: Both actors chose not to extend their contracts,” he said. “CBS was extremely generous and proactive in their renegotiation talks. So much so, the actors were getting unprecedented raises, but in the end, they chose to move on. No one wanted to see them go — they are irreplaceable.”

    Park, who lives in Vancouver when not shooting the show in Hawaii, had asked to dramatically reduce the number of episodes she appeared in, according to the knowledgeable source. “After being away from her family for seven years, I understood Grace’s decision to leave,” Lenkov said.

    Critics on social media said the studio’s insistence it had offered the actors significant raises illustrates they had been underpaid for years.

    There is little hard data proving Asian Americans in Hollywood are systematically underpaid. The Screen Actors Guild and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists said it doesn’t track compensation beyond union minimums because the information is often kept under wraps by the studios, agents and individual actors.

    Experts said this week’s furor over the “Hawaii Five-0” salary gap, and Kim’s taking a stand on the issue, could mark a turning point.

    “Five years ago, this wouldn’t have gotten this kind of attention,” said Janet Yang, producer of “The People vs. Larry Flynt” and “The Joy Luck Club.” She and others credited the #OscarsSoWhite controversy for encouraging Asian Americans to stand up for their rights.

    “More people are emboldened now,” Yang said. “The African American community has led the conversation for so long, and now it’s expanded to other minorities.”

    Social media and the rise of niche entertainment channels, YouTube and streaming services such as Netflix also have spurred traditional Hollywood players to be more inclusive.

    “Because you have so many platforms where people can tell stories from underrepresented faces and voices, audiences are driving all these decision-makers to reevaluate all the things they greenlight,” said Adam Moore, SAG-AFTRA’s national director of equal employment opportunity and diversity.

    Johnson, the actress, couldn’t recall auditioning for a lead in any pilot in the 20 years before “Fresh Off the Boat.” “That tells me a lot about where we are,” said Johnson, though she says there’s still room for improvement.

    Tashima, the Oscar-winning filmmaker, agreed. “Growing up, I always felt second-rate because I wasn’t like the kids you saw on TV,” he said. “I’m seeing a lot of change now. It’s not as much as we want.”
    What bugs me the most about this is that it's Hawaii, which is so Asian. Imagine if this were a show about Chinatown. It's kind of like that.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #15
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    ITB S:3 auditions

    Copied from Rudolf Vrba's facebook:



    Hi Guys

    Just putting out an invitation for any stunt performers or martial artists who are interested in coming along to an audition day, and show us your skills to consider you for work on the AMC show 'Into the Badlands' in Ireland. It is a full on martial arts show and a very high level of fighting skills, weapons and reactions are required.
    I will be in the UK with Vi-Dan Tran and Andy Cheng (Jackie Chan Team) on Saturday the 19th of August in London to consider you for the show. I say again, we are looking for a very high standard of Hong Kong style skills from both male and female, so please only apply if you think you have what we want.

    We have confirmed now the audition will be at UELSports
    University of East London, E16 2RD. Please arrive from 11.30am onwards and the audition will begin at 12pm.

    You can send me your details and CV to :
    stuntsintothebadlands@gmail.com prior to the auditions.
    Please share with your martial arts friends.
    Thank you
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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