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Thread: Into The Badlands

  1. #211
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    If Netflix gets involved they could definitely pull it off to launch season 4, fingers crossed.

  2. #212
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    Netflix & Audi

    Quote Originally Posted by PalmStriker View Post
    If Netflix gets involved they could definitely pull it off to launch season 4, fingers crossed.
    Read my exit interview with Daniel - Daniel Wu on #SaveIntoTheBadlands:
    GC: Since the show was cancelled, the fans have rallied with a #SaveIntoTheBadlands campaign. How do you feel about that?

    DW: It’s amazing. I’m super touched by it. It might work. It may not. I don’t know what channel would want to take it on. I know for a fact that we’ve shopped it to a couple other places like Netflix and Hulu and all that stuff, and we’ve been politely turned down just because they have their own content now. Netflix has Wu Assassins coming up with Lewis [Tan]. And it’s ironic because we started this trend and now were getting rejected because everyone else is doing something.
    More on Wu Assassins here.

    Anyone else get nostalgic when they hear that new 2019 Audi A4 ad?
    Gene Ching
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  3. #213
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    The Widow FTW!

    Congrats to Emily Beecham. I've had the pleasure of meeting her three times, interviewing her once and having dinner seated next to her once. She's very sweet and drop dead gorgeous in person.

    Britain's Beecham joins A-list with Cannes best actress win
    AFP AFP•May 25, 2019


    Beecham has spent most of her career in supporting roles (AFP Photo/Valery HACHE)


    Beecham has spent most of her career in supporting roles (AFP Photo/Valery HACHE)

    Cannes (France) (AFP) - Britain's Emily Beecham has been catapulted into the movie big time by winning best actress at the Cannes film festival for playing an enigmatic scientist in "Little Joe".

    Beecham, who has spent most of her career in supporting roles, was a surprise choice for the award for her performance as a botanist working on a flower that gives off a scent so ambrosial it makes people euphoric just to sniff it.

    Indeed she admitted that she was so shocked that "I forgot to pack my toothbrush" when she received a call, after she'd left Cannes, telling her to come back and pick up the prize.

    But while Beecham's rise has hardly been meteoric, the 35-year-old has been marked out as a talent to watch for a decade, winning best actress awards at both the Edinburgh and London Independent film festivals for one of her first films, "The Calling", in 2009.

    Her big break came two years ago playing what Variety called "one of the more unpleasant characters in recent memory", a misanthropic young woman who witnesses a stabbing in Peter Mackie Burns' arthouse gem, "Daphne".

    That helped consolidate the reputation the Manchester-born actress had won for a stream of British television roles including in the award-winning series "The Unforgiven", and the even more acclaimed "The Village", where she played opposite Maxine Peake and John Simm in the gritty historical rural drama.

    - Martial arts queen -

    Doors really began to open up for her in the United States, her mother's homeland, after she landed a small part in the Coen brothers 2016 sword and sandals send-up, "Hail, Caesar!"

    By then she had landed the role of The Widow in the US martial arts action series, "Into the Badland".

    Although her father is a pilot, she caught the acting bug at her school, the elite Hurtwood House in Surrey, which bills itself as "the most exciting school in England".

    It is also the alma mater of the "Mary Poppins" star Emily Blunt and Princess Sarah Zeid of Jordan.

    Beecham told AFP that she jumped at the chance to work with the highly-rated "Little Joe" director Jessica Hausner.

    "She's one of the only female directors I've worked with so far. She's extraordinary," Beecham said of the Austrian, who was vying for Cannes top prize, the Palme d'Or.

    "But I'm noticing more scripts and things come through with female directors attached. It's brilliant."

    - Smart women -

    The actress, who played opposite fellow Briton and "Mary Poppins" star Ben Whishaw and New Zealander Kerry Fox in the movie, said she was "profoundly inspired" by the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier and the naturalist Jane Goodall as she researched her role.

    "One thing they both talked about -- Jane Goodall discussed it specifically -- is that her relationship with her family interfered with her research. She kind of had to put (her family) on the back burner and put the chimpanzees in the forefront."

    Beecham said that she tried to work the pain of that into her character, a senior researcher in a biotech firm in the UK of the near future.

    Hausner said she wanted to explore how "crazy" becomes a label used to keep women down.

    "I was always fascinated by the films about crazy women. I felt that male perspective and I thought 'Yeah, but what's so crazy about them?'" she said.

    "The 'craziness' of women is actually the very interesting point about them because I think it's also about being sensitive and intelligent."

    Beecham told AFP after she won the prize that she was drawn to Hausner after seeing her previous film "Lourdes", set in the French town where some Catholics believe the Virgin Mary appeared.

    "So I loved her work already. Ben Whishaw was attached and I read the script and it was unquestionably a great project to be involved in and I really wanted to do it," she said.
    THREADS:
    Cannes
    Into The Badlands
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  4. #214
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    I hope Badlands gets an Emmy nod

    action = porn. yeah, we know all about that around here...

    TURES JUNE 3, 2019 8:30AM PT
    How ‘Bodyguard,’ ‘Ozark,’ ‘Into the Badlands’ Use Action to Enhance Tension
    By CHRISTIAN LONG


    CREDIT: COURTESY OF NETFLIX/BBC

    The idea of using traditional thriller tropes in a TV show can be a tricky one. Unlike action movies, in which the story is typically used to string together elaborately choreographed fight scenes long enough for the hero to limp off into the sunset, with a series, the action has to be balanced out with the larger story, while the consequences of any shootouts or sword fights will ripple through the narrative long after the smoke clears.

    But utilizing action on the small screen can heighten and subvert the storytelling and help elevate the medium. While there are obvious big-budget contenders, including HBO’s “Game of Thrones” and AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” others, such as BBC America’s “Killing Eve,” AMC’s “Into the Badlands” and Netflix’s “Ozark,” all utilize action-thriller elements as a method to amplify their storytelling, rather than overshadow it.

    “Action can be like porn, in that you just skip through the drama to get to the action,” says Miles Millar, co-showrunner of the post-apocalyptic epic “Into the Badlands.” “For us, action’s only meaningful if you care about the characters.”

    While the series concluded its three-season run in May, the action sequences were crucial to its narrative. Set in a distant, war-torn future in which guns no longer exist, it used elaborate combat sequences influenced by Hong Kong martial-arts cinema. But, for all its stylized choreography, there always needed to be a reason for a fight to occur in the first place.

    “The fighting had to move both the character and the plot forward,” says co-showrunner Alfred Gough. “The first thing we’d ask in the writers’ room is, ‘Why are we fighting?’ It couldn’t be just, ‘We’re going to stop and have a fight.’ The fights are like musical numbers. They need to be plot-movers and show-stoppers and really carry our story forward and have a unique concept.”

    Jed Mercurio, the showrunner behind BBC and Netflix’s political thriller “Bodyguard,” has a similar approach, despite the series’ very different premise. “Bodyguard” kicked off its six-episode run last August in the U.K. before debuting in the U.S. in October, and takes place in the much more grounded world of present-day counter-terrorism. So its action had to remain fundamental to the narrative, as well as its main character, the PTSD-plagued protection officer David Budd, played by “Game of Thrones” alum Richard Madden.

    “We wanted to portray this type of character, the protection officer, as someone who was very adept in an action sequence,” Mercurio says. “It was really about constructing action sequences that gave him choices to make and moved his character journey forward.”

    Along with serving the show’s larger narrative, the action scenes in “Bodyguard” also needed to feel of the world to keep even the biggest moments grounded.

    “It was more going for the tone of realism, the sense that the action has to play out on the plausible level,” Mercurio says. He wanted to avoid “the kind of comic-book violence and action that you see in a lot of movies at the present time.”

    That sentiment is shared by Chris Mundy, showrunner of the Netflix crime drama “Ozark,” which premiered its second season in August.

    Even before production on the first season began, Mundy and executive producer, director and star Jason Bateman discussed their plan to use traditional action tropes within the confines of their story.

    “We didn’t want things to be hyper-real. We didn’t want them to be exaggerated, both in language, but also in violence and things like that,” Mundy says.

    “We didn’t want to play it overly heightened because it would just be a different kind of show than we wanted to do. What we really talked about is [that] it needed to feel real for everybody involved on screen so that it could be effective, even when we were doing crazy things.”

    Even before the tone of the action was established, it was important for Mundy and Bateman to find the right pacing to allow for its storytelling to unfold naturally.

    “We needed to work that out before we figured out how much action we did, how much we didn’t, how talky we were, how
    visceral we were,” Mundy says. “It definitely took some time. I would say we were four or five episodes into Season 1 before we figured out what the recipe was for us.”

    Despite the premise and tone of each individual series, thriller elements are proving to raise the dramatic tension overall.

    “As we go into each action sequence, we have an understanding of where the characters are and what’s at stake for them,” says Mercurio. “So as we go through the action sequence, we’re invested in the outcome for the characters.”
    Gene Ching
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  5. #215
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    Into The Badlands Season 3 - 2019 Emmy Submission For Outstanding Stunt Coordination

    Gene Ching
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  6. #216
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    ftw

    Gene Ching
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  7. #217
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    Luv Emily...

    ...Team Widow forever!

    Shanghai: Emily Beecham on the Mental Health Challenges of Acting
    3:38 AM PDT 6/25/2019 by Mathew Scott


    Michael Tran/FilmMagic
    Emily Beecham

    "Be a happy person even if the person you are playing is not," says the Palme d'Or winner and 'Into the Badlands' star, who was joined at the Shanghai festival by Chinese star Yong Mei to discuss the art of acting.

    Palme d'Or-winning British actress Emily Beecham (Little Joe, Into the Badlands) at the Shanghai International Film Festival urged fellow actors to look after their mental health and to be prepared for the difficulties that can come with playing "difficult characters."

    "Be a happy person even if the person you are playing is not," she said. "Be aware that the mind is a powerful thing, so use it in the right way."

    Beecham was joined on stage by Chinese actress Yong Mei – winner of this year’s Berlin’s Silver Bear for her turn in the Wang Xiaoshuai-directed drama So Long, My Son – for the final masterclass at this year’s Shanghai festival. Entitled "Actress on Actress," it shed light on the craft that has brought both actresses fame, and on its effects.

    "Some of the best actors I have worked with do suffer from anxiety and emotional [problems]," said Beecham. "I think it goes hand in hand with being a sensitive person. A lot of great actors are very sensitive and vulnerable. It can affect you. So it is good that people are talking about this."

    Beecham said laughter had helped in her own career, which has included her award-winning turn as the scientist messing with life forces in director Jessica Hausner’s Little Joe, as well as a long-running part as the Widow in the martial arts-themed TV series Into The Badlands.

    "You have to have a sense of humor about it as well," she said. "You’re not a doctor, not saving people’s lives. It’s just acting, so don’t take it too seriously. Have empathy with the character you are playing, but leave it at the end of the day."

    The 35-year-old revealed that when starting out, she had heard other actors talk about "leaving the role at home." But "I’d never quite understood it until I started getting in to it," she said. "The hours are very long, so you can do really strange hours and then you have to just switch off and go to sleep. That can be a lot of pressure, especially if you’ve done a scene where you’ve been chased by a monster, or you’ve seen a death. So look after yourself, and look after your mental health as well."

    The pair discussed in general terms how they prepared for roles, and the differences they have found between acting for the large and the small screen. Beecham said that input was often welcomed in the former but frowned upon in the latter.

    "My last two films I’ve really liked the scripts and didn’t want to change them," she said. "But I did do a TV series. It needed ratings, to keep the ratings up. It was entertainment; it wasn’t very deep. There were lots of things I wanted to change about that, but I had no control. It was not welcomed, my opinion. So that’s just a different kind of job, really. There are just different jobs, [but] amazing, independent film is just a privilege to be in." She didn't share which TV series she was referring to.

    Beecham also said she hadn’t found much use for her classical theater training since moving on to movies. "I don’t believe you really need it," she said. "Especially with film. There are techniques you can use, but I have found life experience to be a much better teacher. Learning about yourself as a human being is a much better way of learning. Understanding human beings. Life."

    The 49-year-old Yong revealed she had landed her first role – in the Chinese series The Man Who Herds the Clouds (1997) – with no previous acting experience. "I trained myself," she said. "I was my own teacher, and I learned from exchanges with the director and other actors. You try your best to accumulate life experience in order to become a better actor."
    THREADS
    Into The Badlands
    Shanghai International Film Festival
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  8. #218
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    More on Emily

    The Widow is on FIRE!

    I'm tempted to make an indie thread just for Emily but I haven't done that for Daniel yet (and he's a personal friend).

    ‘Cruella’: Cannes Best Actress Winner Emily Beecham Joins Disney Live-Action Prequel With Emma Stone
    By Andreas Wiseman
    International Editor
    @AndreasWiseman
    September 20, 2019 7:24am


    Credit: Alberto Tandoi

    EXCLUSIVE: Cannes Best Actress 2019 winner Emily Beecham (Little Joe) has joined Disney’s live-action prequel Cruella.

    About a young Cruella de Vil, the ‘baddie’ from Disney classic 101 Dalmations, the family pic is currently shooting in the UK at Shepperton Studios. Previously announced are Emma Stone as de Vil, Emma Thompson, Paul Walter Hauser and Joel Fry.


    ‘Cruella’ first-look photo
    Disney

    Story line and character details are being kept largely under wraps. Craig Gillespie (I, Tonya) is directing and U.S. release date is set for May 28, 2021, Memorial Day weekend. Disney released a fun first look at the movie at D23 this summer.

    Rising UK actress Beecham most recently starred with Ben Whishaw and Kerry Fox in drama-sci-fi Little Joe, which played in competition in Cannes and was picked up by Magnolia for U.S distribution. Beecham won the festival’s Best Actress prize for the film which rolls out this autumn and winter.

    She is also known for her roles in SXSW comedy-drama Daphne and AMC action-adventure series Into The Badlands. The actress recently starred with Anthony Mackie in Netflix sci-fi Outside The Wire and she has UK feature Sulphur And White upcoming.

    Beecham is repped by ICM, Troika and Seven Summits Pictures & Management.
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  9. #219
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    Back to Sunny...

    SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 6:00PM PT
    Daniel Wu Joins Genies Avatar Agency (EXCLUSIVE)
    By PATRICK FRATER
    Asia Bureau Chief


    CREDIT: MEDIAPUNCH/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

    Asian-American star, Daniel Wu has partnered with Genies, the Los Angeles-based company that creates working avatars for celebrities.

    The company’s proprietary technology allows users to express ideas, thoughts, and feelings in a way they cannot with text, voice, or camera – and to be in two or more places at once. Other users include Rihanna, Cardi B and “Hustlers” star Jennifer Lopez

    Wu will use his avatars to help expand brand engagement in both China and the U.S., leveraging his dual celebrity status in both countries. He joins Yoshiki and Namie Amuro as Genie’s third strategic brand partner in the Asian marketplace this month.

    Wu has starred in over 50 films and is currently produces and stars in the AMC martial arts drama series “Into the Badlands.” Within Asia, his film hits include “Overheard” and “Go Away, Mr Tumor.”

    “Wu is an multi-hyphenate actor, producer and director, with a global fan base that is continuing to grow as he enters a third decade in the industry,” said Peter Loehr, senior advisor to Genies. “He stays relevant by being an innovator.”

    Within the Genies app and each platform, talent and brands can search through an extensive library of clothing, and then animations using keywords, emotional categories, or topical action packs that are refreshed every week.

    The company recently announced integration of its avatars on social media and chat platforms including Instagram, Snapchat, and WhatsApp and for Asia it has compatibility with social platforms Weibo, WeChat, Line, and Kakao.
    Daniel often likes my gram posts. That amuses me greatly.

    'multi-hyphenate' - must remember that term.
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  10. #220
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    18th Annual Unforgettable Gala


    Character Media Announces Nominees For 18th Annual Unforgettable Gala




    Character Media announced today the nominees for the 18th Annual Unforgettable Gala. The Gala is the preeminent awards show to recognize Asian American icons and changemakers in the entertainment industry, who are representing the community through their creativity and excellence. Nominees were voted on by Character Media's selection committee of experts, who represent various fields and creative disciplines, including film, television, music, sports, digital technology and philanthropy.

    The following are this year's nominees. Additional awards will be announced at a later date.

    Actor/Actress in Television:

    Daniel Wu - "Into the Badlands"

    Jameela Jamil - "The Good Place"

    Karen Fukuhara - "The Boys"

    Leonardo Nam - "Westworld"

    Nico Santos - "Superstore"

    Actor/Actress on Film:

    Ali Wong - "Always Be My Maybe"

    Awkwafina - "The Farewell"

    Kumail Nanjiani - "Stuber"

    Randall Park - "Always Be My Maybe"

    Steven Yeun - "Burning"

    Breakout Actor/Actress on Television:

    Andrew Koji - "Warrior"

    Derek Mio - "The Terror: Infamy"

    Greta Lee - "Russian Doll"

    Maya Erskine - "Pen15"

    Sydney Park - "Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists"

    Breakout Actor/Actress on Film:

    Charles Melton - "The Sun is Also a Star"

    Himesh Patel - "Yesterday"

    Maya Erskine - "Plus One"

    Tiffany Chu - "Ms. Purple"

    Viveik Kalra - "Blinded by the Light"

    Comic Performance:

    Ali Wong - "Always Be My Maybe"

    Hasan Minhaj - "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj"

    Jo Koy - "Comin' in Hot"

    Ken Jeong - "Ken Jeong: You Complete Me, Ho"

    Ronny Chieng - "The Daily Show"

    Director:

    James Wan - "Aquaman"

    Jimmy Chin, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi - "Free Solo"

    Justin Chon - "Ms. Purple"

    Lulu Wang - "The Farewell"

    Nisha Ganatra - "Late Night"

    Digital Influencer:

    Bobby Hundreds

    Bretman Rock

    Jenn Im

    Jubilee Media

    Steven Lim

    The award recipients will be announced at the 18th Annual Unforgettable Gala, held at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, CA, on December 14, 2019.
    THREADS
    Asian Film Festivals and Awards
    Into The Badlands
    The Farewell
    Warrior
    Aquaman
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  11. #221
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    Been there, done that, wrote the cover story

    Not sure why this is popping up now. It's so after-the-fact.

    Into The Badlands: Daniel Wu's Original Role (It Wasn't Playing Sunny)
    Before playing the deadly Clipper, Sunny, in Into the Badlands, Daniel Wu initially a rather different role in the AMC series.
    BY NICHOLAS RAYMOND
    DEC 06, 2019



    Daniel Wu, who played the lead character on AMC's Into the Badlands, almost didn't star in the show, and originally had just a behind-the-camera role in the post-apocalyptic martial arts series. For three seasons, Daniel Wu starred in Into the Badlands as a highly-trained killer named Sunny. At the beginning, Sunny was in the service of Baron Quinn (Marton Csokas), but by the end of the series, Sunny was a wandering swordsman whose main responsibility was protecting his child.

    Before joining the cast of Into the Badlands, actor Daniel Wu had an impressively long list of movie roles under his belt. Wu, who was largely associated with the Hong Kong movie industry, was a frequent collaborator of celebrated Hong Kong movie director and former martial arts star, Derek Yee. Wu, who has a background in martial arts, has appeared in several kung fu movies, working alongside notable martial arts actors and directors like Yuen Woo-ping, Stephen Chow, and on numerous occasions, Jackie Chan. Wu's biggest film is Derek Yee's Protégé, an award-winning crime drama which had Wu in the starring role.

    When AMC began developing Into the Badlands, Daniel Wu was hired as an executive producer due to his experience in martial arts. Wu was expected to handle the martial arts side of the series. Wu played an active role in finding an Asian actor who could play the lead character, Sunny. At the time, Wu was uninterested in starring in the show, due to his age. The 40-year-old actor was concerned that the intensity and the frequency of the fights would be too physically demanding because there was a possibility that the show could last for several years [via The Frame].



    For this reason, Wu decided to look for an actor in his late 20s or early 30s with enough martial arts experience to play Sunny. When the search didn't yield any satisfying results, Wu decided to play Sunny himself. According to Wu, playing the lead character was "very physically challenging" because of the high numbers of fight scenes he had to shoot, which is more than what would be expected of him in a movie.

    One of the reasons why Into the Badlands was so loved by fans was its commitment to presenting viewers with authentic kung fu and beautifully choreographed fight scenes, including the stunning final battle in the series finale. As its star (and one of its executive producers), Daniel Wu was a big part of that, so it's hard to imagine what the show would have been like without him.
    We had a good run in the Badlands. I miss it.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #222
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    Prop auction

    There's a lot of crazy stuff in these auction lots. Sad to see. Having been in the prop rooms, th quality of a lot of this stuff is just amazing.

    Badlands was an amazing place.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #223
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    A new interview

    Read my latest feature for Den of Geek: Into the Badlands: Daniel Wu On How The Series Became A Cult Hit.

    Gene Ching
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  14. #224
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    What's next

    Read my latest feature for Den of Geek: Into the Badlands: What’s Next For Daniel Wu.



    Threads
    Into-The-Badlands
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  15. #225
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    What's next

    Gene Ching
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