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Thread: Luke Cage

  1. #16
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    We don't have a Walking Dead thread

    So I'll post this here because John Bernecker's death because it was mentioned here before (It was also mentioned on the Deadpool 2 thread but that's more about Joi.

    'Walking Dead' Production Company Fined for "Serious" Citation Over Stuntman's Death
    2:47 PM PST 1/5/2018 by Lauren Huff


    John Bernecker

    OSHA issued the maximum fine allowable, citing the company's "failure to provide adequate protection from fall hazards," following its investigation into John Bernecker's death.
    Following the death of 33-year-old Walking Dead stuntman John Bernecker in July 2017, OSHA has imposed the maximum fine allowable in the citation's category against the show's production company, Stalwart Films LLC. The stuntman fell more than 20 feet on the Georgia set of the show July 12.

    OSHA, or the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, issued a "serious" citation "for the company’s failure to provide adequate protection from fall hazards" following its investigation into Bernecker's death. The fine for the citation is $12,675.

    According to its website, the majority of OSHA citations are listed as "serious," as opposed to "willfull" or "repeat" violations, which are considered more serious.

    “This tragedy should serve as a wake-up call for the entertainment industry,” said OSHA Atlanta regional administrator Kurt Petermeyer in a statement. “The entire industry needs to commit to safety practices for actors and stunt people involved in this type of work.”

    The company now has 15 business days to comply or contest the findings.

    In response to the fine, Stalwart Films LLC released the following statement, obtained by THR: "This was a tragic and terrible accident. We take the safety of our employees extremely seriously on all of our sets and comply with — and frequently exceed — industry safety standards. We disagree with the issuance of this citation and are considering our response.”

    In addition to OSHA's investigation, SAG-AFTRA announced at the time it was looking into the matter as well.

    According to a sheriff's report issue following the incident, it took almost a half-hour for the medevac to reach Bernecker. The report also stated that prior to his fall, Bernecker had told an actor that he had done “a few” high fall stunts before, but “never this high up” and, per the report, he seemed nervous beforehand.

    Bernecker was supposed to fall off of a balcony and onto the collection of pads, boxes and PortaPit pads below, but he missed them by inches. Production on The Walking Dead was halted following his death, but resumed days later on July 17.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, arts, entertainment and recreation is the 12th most dangerous industry in Georgia, with 5.3 nonfatal injuries and illnesses for every 100 workers in 2015, the most recent year with data available. The California rate was 4.6 per hundred.

    Stuntman John Bernecker died from injuries sustained during a fall on the AMC show, now filming its eighth season.


    Jan. 5, 3:57 p.m. Updated to clarify the different types of citations; added Stalwart Films LLC statement.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #17
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    Meme from the JAN+FEB 2018 issue

    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    One more meme on James Lew's Emmy from the JAN+FEB 2018

    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    Marvel's Luke Cage - Season 2 | Official Trailer #2 [HD] | Netflix

    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    Daughters of the Dragon



    'Luke Cage' Star Has Ideas for a 'Daughters of the Dragon' Spin-Off

    With Season 2 bringing the Marvel duo to live-action, Simone Missick shares her thoughts on a full-fledged series.
    By Eric Francisco on June 23, 2018

    The series may be titled Luke Cage, but Simone Missick regularly steals the spotlight as the hard-boiled Harlem police detective Misty Knight. And in one episode of Season 2, now streaming on Netflix, Misty Knight teams up with a new friend, kung fu master Colleen Wing (Jessica Henwick) from Iron Fist, bringing to life the cool-as-ice duo known as the Daughters of the Dragon.

    In an interview with Inverse, Missick reveals she has serious thoughts about a live-action Daughters of the Dragon show set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. And in the climate of #MeToo, the Michigan-born Marvel actress says a Daughters series would be especially relevant, socially and politically.

    When asked if Missick would be interested in a Daughters of the Dragon series, she replied, “Absolutely.”

    “Jessica [Henwick] and I are very similar in the way we look at storytelling for women, for women of color, making sure that the narrative is authentic,” Missick says. “I think the two of us would make sure that we tell stories that are culturally and politically relevant in this time period right now.”

    So what would Missick’s culturally relevant Daughters of the Dragon series look like? “Not stereotypical or derisive against Asian women, African-American women, women in general,” she explains.

    In comics, Misty Knight and Colleen Wing first teamed up as the Daughters of the Dragon in issue #64 of Marvel Team-Up, a Spider-Man-centric series that often featured Spidey briefly join forces with characters like the Human Torch, Thor, Daredevil, She-Hulk, Black Widow, Shang-Chi.
    Sure, we all want our own spin-off.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #21
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    I like Luke Cage, but I still can't stand Iron Fist



    Why the Big 'Luke Cage' Season 2 Crossover Is More Than a Marvel Easter Egg
    Cheo Hodari Coker unpacks the history of kung fu in hip-hop.
    By Eric Francisco on June 28, 2018

    Filed Under Fighting, Hip-Hop, Iron Fist, Marvel Comics, Marvel Movies, Marvel Universe, Netflix, Superheroes, The Defenders & TV Shows
    In the tenth episode of Marvel’s Luke Cage Season 2, now streaming on Netflix, the eponymous hero (played by Mike Colter) teams up with an old buddy from The Defenders: billionaire kung fu master Danny Rand, known as the Immortal Iron Fist (Finn Jones). Together in the comics, the two are the “Heroes for Hire,” a dynamic duo of contrasts who fight crime side-by-side.

    But bringing Marvel’s tag team to life on Netflix is more than an ass-kicking Easter egg. For showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker, it represents the intersection where black and Asian-American pop culture meet.

    In Luke Cage, Danny comes to Pop’s Barbershop to help his bulletproof BFF take down Bushmaster. On bringing Iron Fist to his show, Coker says he wanted a throwback to kung fu movies like the Iron Fist comics of yore.

    “I felt if we had the chance to have [Iron Fist] in our show, it would be more like the comic book and a lot more like that friendship,” Coker tells Inverse. “Capture that Enter the Dragon flavor that comic was always supposed to have.”

    But there’s more to evoking kung fu than aesthetics. “There’s so much that comes from that crossing of culture,” he says. “The reason Grandmaster Flash is called ‘Grandmaster’ is because he and his friends would come and go to the kung fu forts on 42nd Street.”


    Finn Jones (left) and Mike Colter (right) in Season 2 of 'Luke Cage' on Netflix.

    In 2018, Asian media like K-pop and anime attract a diverse audience, including many African-Americans. But for Coker’s generation, the racial crossover came in the appetite for kung fu films by black audiences. Ground zero for this intersection were the grimy theaters of Manhattan, like the Cine 42 nestled in the heart of Times Square before it became a sanitized tourist destination.

    If Coker didn’t catch the Saturday kung fu marathons on local TV stations in Connecticut, the soon-to-be producer watched John Woo and Shaw Brothers flicks like The 36 Chambers of Shaolin and The Eight Pole Diagram Fighter in New York for a buck fifty.

    “I’ve always wanted to do a modernized version of Last Hurrah of Chivalry or A Better Tomorrow,” Coker says.

    In fact, it was in the same theaters Coker frequented where the legendary hip-hop outfit the Wu-Tang Clan was born. “I got my introduction to kung fu flicks in ‘78 or ‘79,” wrote Wu-Tang founder RZA in the 2004 book Wu-Tang Manual. “At that point, all of 42nd Street had kung fu movies.”

    On one cold night, RZA and the late rapper ODB found refuge “at this funky theater at 42nd Street and 7th Avenue.” Screening that night was Gordon Li’s 1983 classic, Shaolin and Wu Tang.

    “When it came on, it woke us up,” RZA recalled. “It was the best kung-fu movie I’d ever seen in my life — the fighting, the ideas, the concepts, everything.”


    'Shaolin vs. Wu Tang' (1983).

    A variety of forces led to the crossover of black and Asian cinema in the 1970s: White flight to the suburbs, black veterans returning home from Korea and Vietnam, and the meteoric growth of Asia’s economy created a storm for artistic intersectionality.

    “As white people abandoned the cities, downtown theaters became spaces for people of color,” said Amy Obugo Ongiri, author of Spectacular Blackness, in a 2009 interview with SF Gate. “Theater owners started screening stuff that was less marketable, mostly cheap imports — and that meant martial arts movies.”

    But arguably no one did as much to popularize kung fu as Bruce Lee, the film icon whose achievements exude the mystique of folk hero. Among many things, Lee was a progressive who taught non-Chinese, including black people, kung fu. NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was among Lee’s students.

    “In the 1970s, [Bruce] Lee was a rare non-white leading man, and an unfeasibly cool one at that,” observed Phil Hoad for The Guardian. “His creed of righteous self-reliance appealed to black audiences, who were emerging from the civil rights struggles … Martial arts films, like blaxploitation, were adrenalin-drunk revenge fantasies.”

    “There was a time in hip-hop where people would actually dress like Bruce Lee,” Coker remembers. “They used to call it the kung fu suits, that black suit Bruce Lee would wear. They would walk around in the kung fu suit and maybe had nunchucks. That **** was real.”


    Bruce Lee and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, in the 1978 film 'Game of Death' released several years after Lee's death.

    Lee’s death in 1973, just before the release of his first and only Hollywood film Enter the Dragon, ignited a voracious hunger. Pop culture exploded with martial arts, from the popular TV series Kung Fu with David Carradine to the 1974 pop jingle “Kung Fu Fighting” by Carl Douglas.

    Kung fu’s popularity soon inspired one Roy Thomas. Like many comic book creators, Thomas lived and worked in New York and created Iron Fist after watching a kung fu movie in the city. While Thomas imagined Iron Fist as a white American who learns kung fu in mystical K’un-Lun (which became an issue for the Netflix series decades later), Iron Fist is still energized by the west’s obsession for Asian culture.

    When sales of Iron Fist and Luke Cage’s comics began to decline, Marvel editors paired the two together, creating the iconic series Power Man and Iron Fist. Even after their series ended, the two characters often appeared together in Marvel crossovers and revivals. The most recent iteration of Power Man and Iron Fist, written by David F. Walker in 2016, ran for fifteen issues.


    Cover of 'Power Man and Iron Fist' #15, illustrated by Sanford Greene.

    Now, they’re back again in the Marvel/Netflix franchise. “That was one of the things we wanted to capture in the show,” Coker says about the Heroes for Hire, “these fights having a deep kung fu base.”

    “I’ve told all of my fight choreographers, I want Shaw Brothers’ type coverage, not the hyper-cut Paul Greengrass does in Bourne Identity,” he explains. “I want where you actually see people fighting in frame. The Wachowski Brothers did that. Quentin did it with Kill Bill. Those fight scenes, that’s where the fun is. That’s where the genre is. It’s important to reflect that.”

    Marvel’s Luke Cage is streaming now on Netflix.

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  7. #22
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    cancelled

    First Iron Fist (thankfully) now Luke (not so grateful).

    Netflix Pulls The Plug On ‘Luke Cage’, No Season 3 For Marvel’s Harlem Hero
    by Dominic Patten
    and Nellie Andreeva
    October 19, 2018 7:14pm


    Netflix

    EXCLUSIVE: One week after Iron Fist was canned and the same day that the long awaited third season of Daredevil launched, Netflix has canceled Luke Cage.

    “Unfortunately, Marvel’s Luke Cage will not return for a third season,” Marvel and the streaming service said on Friday. “Everyone at Marvel Television and Netflix is grateful to the dedicated showrunner, writers, cast and crew who brought Harlem’s Hero to life for the past two seasons, and to all the fans who have supported the series.”

    This axing of Luke Cage came as a surprise.

    A writers’ room under showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker had been working for around six months producing scripts and taking notes from Netflix and Marvel. As actors including lead Mike Colter remained under contract, a formal Season 3 order was considered almost a foregone conclusion by all concerned.

    After rising tensions over the past month, that conclusion was scrapped as it all went distinctly south in the last 48 hours.

    The pink slipping of Luke Cage was ultimately a combo of the age old Hollywood “creative differences” and the inability for the parties involved to reach a deal on how to move forward, according to sources. With a season springing from the conclusion of the June 22-launched Season 2 plotted out months ago, detailed drafts for the first half of the 10-episode projected third season were delivered to Marvel and Netflix this week.

    We hear that some execs had issues with the more developed scripts, even though the scripts strongly incorporated suggestions from both Netflix and Marvel brass.

    Add to that, the writers’ room was put on hold for a week in September as the streamer and the Disney-owned company were figuring out the mechanisms of changing the deal for the planned Luke Cage third season from the original 13 episodes to 10 episodes. It eventually escalated to behind-the-scenes turmoil in the past two days and demands for changes in creative regime. With Marvel and Netflix seemingly intractable and on different sides of the disputes, a harsh cancelation became the only viable exit strategy, it appears.

    The revolving door of showrunners on Marvel’s Netflix shows has made new creative teams coming and going almost the norm. There have been new showrunners for every season of Daredevil, Raven Metzner took over Iron Fist for its second and final season, and Jessica Jones’ Melissa Rosenberg is heading off to an overall deal with WBTV once Season 3 of the Krysten Ritter-led series is done.

    In another sense, the cancellation was a done deal as the situation became tense on the corporate level. The Marvel shows on Netflix are costly to make, even with New York’s generous tax credits. Back in 2013, the streamer paid top dollar for the series that it doesn’t even own, so cutting Luke Cage loose was a shifting bottom line call. With the high cost, there has been pressure on the Marvel series to overperform in viewership. That was easier early on when they were among a handful of Netflix originals but is getting harder today as they compete with dozens of other buzzy shows on the Internet network.

    At this point there are no plans for owner Marvel to resurrect Luke Cage on the upcoming Disney streaming service. But, being that the Simone Missick co-starrer crashed Netflix in its first season opening weekend in September 2016 and had a very well watched and well received 13-episode Season 2, it could be a Sweet Christmas, as Cage likes to quip

    After the end of the Finn Jones-led Iron Fist on October 12 and now Luke Cage down for the count, the number of Marvel series on Netflix has been cut by 40%. Only the Charlie Cox and Vincent D’Onofrio toplined Daredevil series, Jessica Jones and The Punisher remain.

    As things stand, the Ritter-fronted and the Jon Bernthal-fueled shows have been renewed for third and second seasons, respectively, and are still on track for their scheduled launch dates. There has never been an intention for a second season of the organizationally challenging The Defenders miniseries, as Netflix VP original content Cindy Holland told Deadline this summer.

    No formal word yet if Netflix’s first Marvel series Daredevil will be coming back for a fourth season. However, with the axe swinging, a lack of Daredevil Season 4 would be the clearest indication that the once warm and fuzzy halcyon days between Marvel and Netflix has hit an ice age.

    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
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    If Marvel isn't already making enough money...

    Curious what price they'll bring and imagining what price the original MCU memorabilia might garner.

    CULTURE & LIFESTYLE
    Published March 21, 2019
    Marvel Television Props & Costumes To Be Auctioned for the First Time Ever by Prop Store

    Fans and collectors will have the opportunity to own an authentic piece of 'Marvel's Daredevil,' 'Marvel's Luke Cage,' and 'Marvel's Iron Fist'!
    BY MARVEL
    Prop Store, one of the leading film and TV memorabilia companies, in association with the world renowned Marvel Entertainment, has today announced it is hosting the first ever MARVEL TELEVISION live auction featuring original costumes, props and set decoration from "Marvel’s Daredevil," "Marvel’s Luke Cage" and "Marvel’s Iron Fist."



    Over 750 lots will be offered in this first of its kind live two-day auction, taking place in August 2019 at Prop Store’s auction facility in Los Angeles County, California. In addition to live bidding, out-of-town fans can participate via telephone or online via www.propstore.com/marvel. You can now subscribe to receive e-mail updates about the auction and bidding opens in July 2019.

    Chuck Costas, VP of Business Development & Operations for Prop Store, commented on the upcoming auction: “Marvel created ground-breaking television with the shows featuring their 'Street Level Heroes' including Daredevil, Luke Cage and Iron Fist. The shows were true to their comic book roots, and fans can now celebrate these shows and appreciate the art that went into creating them by owning a real piece of their production."

    Mike Pasciullo, SVP, Marvel Marketing and Communications, spoke about the upcoming auction: “The props and costumes created for these series are the living embodiment of the comics come to life. We’re happy to work with Prop Store to give fans this unique opportunity to own authentic iconic mementos that were used to create these beloved Marvel shows."

    THREADS:
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  9. #24
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    New Star Wars film?

    New 'Star Wars' Movie in the Works With 'Sleight' Filmmaker (Exclusive)
    FEBRUARY 21, 2020 2:40PM by Borys Kit


    Inset: J.D. Dillard | Lucasfilm/Photofest; Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

    Director J.D. Dillard and 'Luke Cage' writer Matt Owens have been tapped to develop a project, but it is unclear whether it is a theatrical or Disney+ release.
    As Lucasfilm maps out the next phase of Star Wars movies, executives are grappling with this question as development moves ahead: Which characters and stories justify theatrical releases and which should arrive exclusively on the streaming platform Disney+?

    The Hollywood Reporter learned Friday that a new Star Wars project is in the works: J.D. Dillard, best known for writing and directing the sci-fi thriller Sleight, and Matt Owens, a writer on the Marvel shows Luke Cage and Agents of SHIELD, have been tapped to develop it. But insiders say it is undecided whether the project will be for the big screen or for Disney's highly prioritized streaming platform.

    Plot, character and setting details are unknown and are being kept in the murky underworld of Exegol. It also is unclear whether Dillard would direct, should the project move forward. The Dillard project is understood to be unrelated to a Star Wars film pitch by Marvel Studios chief Kevin Feige and potential work from Last Jedi director Rian Johnson.

    Disney and Lucasfilm appear to be shifting gears on the franchise to help boost Disney+, with Disney chairman Bob Iger saying earlier this month that Star Wars’ foreseeable future was in television, with theatrical movies going on a hiatus. The next theatrical film remains on the release calendar for Dec. 16, 2022, with other entries planned in December 2024 and December 2026.

    While Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker has grossed $1.07 billion globally since its December launch and will likely end its run as the sixth-highest-grossing film worldwide of 2019, the trend line for Star Wars films at the box office has declined during the Disney era since 2015's Force Awakens' $2.07 billion haul. The 2018 spinoff film Solo, in particular, grossed $392.9 million and led Iger to concede last September in a New York Times profile that "we might've put a little bit too much in the marketplace too fast."

    Meanwhile, since its Nov. 12 launch, The Mandalorian, the series created by Jon Favreau, has been credited with helping to drive Disney+ to 28.6 million subscribers. (A second season of The Mandalorian is set to arrive in October.) On a Feb. 4 call with investors, Iger described the show as "a bona fide hit and a cultural phenomenon" and said the studio has "a few Star Wars series in varying stages of production and development."

    Iger added that "the priority for Star Wars in the short term is going to be, I'll call it television for Disney+, and then we will have more to say about development of theatrical soon after that."

    Disney+ Star Wars spinoffs are now being targeted even as several other shows are in the works, including one centering on Ewan McGregor's Obi-Wan Kenobi and another on Rogue One character Cassian Andor (played by Diego Luna). And, on Friday, the first episode of the seventh season of the revived animated series Star Wars: The Clone Wars landed on the streaming platform.

    Owens is currently co-writing One Piece, an ambitious live-action adaptation of the manga, for Netflix. He is repped by CAA and Circle of Confusion.

    Dillard made waves with 2016's Sleight, a genre thriller that was well-received when it debuted at Sundance and subsequently picked up by Focus. His last movie was Sweetheart, a horror thriller that starred Kiersey Clemons, and he recently helmed an episode of Utopia, the Gillian Flynn-created series set up at Amazon. Dillard already has some Star Wars experience, as he worked in a production capacity on 2015's The Force Awakens and played a stormtrooper in Rise of Skywalker. Dillard is repped by CAA, Circle of Confusion and law firm Ginsburg Daniels.



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