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Thread: Deadpool

  1. #1
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    Deadpool

    I guess since DC snubbed her for Wonder Woman, she went Marvel.

    Gina Carano Joins Ryan Reynolds in Fox's 'Deadpool' (Exclusive)
    12:25 PM PST 2/13/2015 by Borys Kit
    Before she tackles 'Deadpool, Carano will star opposite Bruce Willis in the action movie 'Extraction.'


    Getty Images
    Gina Carano
    Gina Carano has closed a deal to join Ryan Reynolds in Deadpool, Fox's action movie based on the wisecracking mercenary Marvel character.
    Tim Miller is directing the action adventure project, which is eyeing a March start in Vancouver. Lauren Shuler Donner is producing.
    Reynolds is an assassin who is dying of cancer who undergoes a procedure that is supposed to cure him but ends up twisted and scarred while also imbued with super-powers.
    T.J. Miller is set to bring comedic relief to the movie in an undisclosed role. And, fanboy alert: The Russian X-Men character known as Colossus is slated to appear in the movie.
    Carano will play a character known as Angel Dust. It is unclear how she fits into the proceedings, but in the Marvel comics, the character was part of an underground mutant group known as The Morlocks.
    Before she tackles Deadpool, however, Carano will star opposite Bruce Willis in Extraction, an action movie from Emmett-Furla and Aperture Entertainment.
    Steven C. Miller is directing the story of a CIA operative and his son who is following in his footsteps, with the movie beginning to lens next week.
    The back-to-back shoots continue Carano's nonstop movie momentum. She recently wrapped production on Bus 657 opposite Robert DeNiro, Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kate Bosworth as well as Kickboxer, the reboot of the early 1990s action franchise that also stars Guardians of the Galaxy's Dave Bautista.
    Carano is repped by Gersh, Scott Karp at the Syndicate and Ziffren Brittenham.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    OMG. I am so IN!

    Gina and Morena? I loved Morena's work in Homeland. I must follow her Twitter.

    Morena Baccarin Confirmed as Copycat in Deadpool!
    By Silas Lesnick ON
    March 19, 2015



    It’s finally chimichanga time for 20th Century Fox’s X-Men franchise spinoff Deadpool as production begins in Vancouver on the feature film starring Ryan Reynolds as the “merc with a mouth”. Hot on the heels of this morning’s reveal that T.J. Miller will be playing Weasel comes confirmation that Morena Baccarin will be playing “Vanessa,” who is almost certainly the comics’ Vanessa Geraldine Carlysle, also known as the shapeshifting mutant Copycat. Baccarin herself made the reveal via Twitter and the below image of her on-set chair back. Reynolds also posted an image of his own chair and you can also check it out below.


    Morena Baccarin ✔ @missmorenab
    Follow
    Let's do this.
    2:04 PM - 19 Mar 2015

    Ryan Reynolds ✔ @VancityReynolds
    Follow
    Sometimes the bad guy isn't the villain.
    2:48 PM - 19 Mar 2015
    Created by Fabian Nicieza and Joe Madureira, Copycat made her comic book debut in the same issue as Deadpool, “New Mutants” #98, although fans didn’t know it at the time. The shapeshifting former love of Deadpool was secretly infiltrating X-Force disguised as Domino with a mission to kill the mutant team’s leader, Cable. It wasn’t until several years later, during Marvel’s “Flashback Month,” that Copycat’s full origin story was revealed in the pages of “Deadpool” #-1.

    Also starring Ed Skrein and Gina Carano, Deadpool will also feature the mutant Colossus, though Daniel Cudmore has confirmed he will not appear as the character.

    Tim Miller is set to direct the movie from a script by Zombieland writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick. Deadpool is currently scheduled for a release on February 12, 2016.

    (Photo Credit: WENN.com)
    Gene Ching
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  3. #3
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    Omgx2


    Morena Baccarin Verified account ‏@missmorenab

    I'd hit that. #deadpool #officialsuit @deadpoolmovie @VancityReynolds
    Somebody get me a Deadpool costume ASAP!!!!
    Gene Ching
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  4. #4
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    trailer

    Gene Ching
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  5. #5
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    Nice interview with Gina from ScreenRant

    Gina Carano Talks Deadpool’s Mutants, Powers, and Costumes
    By Rob Keyes 11.09.2015



    Where Wolverine got his enhanced skeleton and claws from the Weapon X program, Wade Wilson a.k.a. Deadpool got his superpowers from a much dirtier, seedier offshoot program. That’s a big part of the story of the first Deadpool film and the focus of much of our conversations with the cast and crew of the film when we visited the Vancouver set in May.

    The first pitch for the Deadpool standalone movie didn’t include an origin story until star Ryan Reynolds explained to writers Rhett Reese and Paul Warnick that it needed to. It needed to erase the “Deadpool” featured in X-Men Origins: Wolverine and explain who and why Wade Wilson is the way he is.

    And a big part of that is due to the actions of Deadpool’s two main antagonists: Ajax (Ed Skrein) and Angel Dust (Gina Carano). We spoke with Carano about joining the Deadpool movie and playing the rage-fueled super strong mutant known as Angel Dust; fighting with a massive CGI Colossus; working with her friend in first-time director Tim Miller; getting serious about the comic books with Ed Skrein, and more!


    Weasel (T.J. Miller) and Angel Dust (Gina Carano)

    Tell us about Angel Dust.

    Gina Carano: She is… well, when I talked to Tim about getting the job, I did a little bit of research and there wasn’t as much on this character, so it gave me some room to play with it. So this is actually my first look. My second look is much more extreme. It’s, I don’t know, a year to five years after, and Mohawk with the braids on the side. So she’s very fashion forward.

    [laughter]

    Gina Carano: What she’s known for is having extreme adrenaline issues. Which, I don’t know. Have you looked up Angel Dust before? It’s kinda like a PCP and people kind of rage on it. I think that’s very fitting for my character. She’s got extreme strength and adrenaline.

    Her strength gets stronger as she gets…

    Gina Carano: More ****ed off, yeah. [laughs] I think that me and Ed [Skrein], he actually took me to my first comic book store when I got here. We were going over our characters. It’s a really beautiful, I think, relationship. My character trusts Ajax with everything. She pretty much only really responds to him. He was created a certain way to be the way he is. In our backstory, he kinda created me and showed me everything. And I do the same thing to everyone else.

    So he’s responsible for giving Angel Dust her powers?

    Gina Carano: Yeah. That’s our backstory. In our relationship, he’s everything. He’s the one that taught me.

    How is working with Tim Miller on his first full-length feature?

    Gina Carano: He’s actually just incredible to work with. I’ve known him for about a year and a half. He called me up and he’s like, “Hey, I’ve got this role for you. I don’t know if you are interested. But it’s yours if you want it. She’s a very strong, silent, physical character.” But it’s really fascinating this being his first film that he’s directed. And watching, after I’ve worked with so many different levels of directors, he’s really just… he’s a natural. I think that he’s doing such a phenomenal job on this that he’s going to be able to do whatever passion projects he wants to after this.

    And he’s honest. He knows exactly what he wants out of everybody and he obviously loves this. I brought in a project to him when I knew him and I was like, “Hey, what about this about angels and demons?” He’s like, “Oh, that’s good. That’s great. No.” He was like, “Let me show you this Deadpool five-minute short that we did.” He was pushing it from back then. And they’ve been working on this for so long. So it’s really cool to see him do…he’s very passionate about Deadpool.

    And he’s hilarious. He’s awesome to work with. He’s a natural. Did you guy talk to him already?


    Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool and director Tim Miller

    Not yet.

    Gina Carano: Well, tell him I hated him, but I really absolutely adore him. [laughs] I absolutely adore him. He’s such a pleasure to work with.

    Earlier we were talking about Colossus as a character who is going to be CGI afterwards. How do you play that in your head?

    Gina Carano: It’s a lot different than most of the fight scenes and the physicality that I’ve had before. I’ve never done anything with CGI, let alone I’ve never done anything with a 6’8” man as far as physicality goes. And then, on top of that he wears these big, massive boots. So it makes him taller. And then he wears this ball on the top of his head because he’s in a CGI, gray suit the whole time. And all of my movements have to be so much bigger.

    My physicality and my adrenaline and my strength has to match this guy. So everything that I do has to be legitimately strong. Usually, I’ll get a fight scene and I’ll see the stunt guys do it, and I’m like, “OK. I’ll make it my own, make it a little bit more fluid.” Well, this one I’m like really relying on the stunt guys to be like…because everything they do is like old-school martial arts movies. And now I’m kinda like, “OK. There’s something to that for this character.”

    Andre [Tricoteux], the guy that plays Colossus, has just been… he’s the biggest sweetheart. He is Colossus to me. Andre Trikotuly? Tricoteux. I’m so bad at names! He’s been such a pleasure to work with. At some point I actually crawl on top of him and he’s standing up. So I’m like 8, 9 feet in the air just looking down at the world like, “This is what your life is like normally! This is interesting. Different perspective!”

    But it was really cool. I’d have to do the fight scene with him. And then I’d have to do it by myself, which I felt a little silly at first. I look like I’m fighting this massive thing that’s not there and it’s like a weird dance. But everybody came up and they’re like, “It’s really cool to see you do this by yourself.” I think they should just cut it together just for my own…like see me just fighting air, but like this massive giant in my head.

    The weird thing is every time I did it, I’d fight with him and I’d do it by myself, and it was almost like he was still there. I’m down with the CGI work. I was a little bit of a skeptic before. Sometimes you see CGI and you are like, “Ehh…” Now I’m kinda getting into it. I usually like to fight somebody and have it be fluid and physical. But this is honestly such a fun, cool job for me. I’m stoked. I’m like, “I don’t want to leave Vancouver! Are you sure you don’t want to put me in anything else, any other scenes?”
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    continued from previous


    The new, all Russian, all CGI Colossus

    Can you tell us a little bit about your character’s story arc throughout the movie and the relationship with other characters besides Ajax?

    Gina Carano: Ajax is my everything. [laughs] Simply put. I really kind of take all my advice… In my head, something happened to her when she was younger and he created her. And so, that’s all that really matters to her. That’s the only person that’s ever been able to get to her. So even in the other scenes… It’s almost like that person that’s just completely obsessed with that person. That’s the way I feel Angel Dust is with Ajax. And so, pretty much I’m like his… I think he said he’s Robert De Niro and I’m his Joe Pesci. [laughs] And it really feels like that. I’m his Joe Pesci. [laughs]

    But Brianna was amazing to work with. Every character has… they fit their role so well. Morena… and Ryan has just been, surprisingly, just one of the… I never knew anything about him before, but it’s been really nice to be a part of a film in such a big level to see something good happen to Ryan, because he’s genuinely one of the nicest actors I’ve ever met.

    We pretty much here are torturing Deadpool and creating him and making him… in a way, saving his life. I know we’re considered the bad ones, but in a way we’re saving his life and turning him into Deadpool. So, me and Ajax get to really create Deadpool, which that just gives me goosebumps. Because I honestly wasn’t really…I didn’t know that much about comics. I’ve read the comic scripts that have come through, and when I read this script I was like, “Oh, ****! This is awesome!” This story just breaks all sorts of boundaries as far as film. I was always wondering why people didn’t do that before and just break some rules. It’s just funny how in life you end up being a part of stuff that kinda fits your own life, like breaking rules and boundaries and constantly pushing the envelope. And that’s what this movie is. So it’s really kind of like a…it’s a really cool thing to be part of. Every single day I’m just like, “This is such a good project.”

    My character is big, strong, and silent. She’s not got a lot to say. But I’m so happy to be a part of it. And he’s probably my favorite comic character now.

    It sounds like you have scenes with all the major characters. You fight Colossus. In that picture it looks like you are fighting Brianna’s character.

    Gina Carano: Oh, yeah. We have a lot of interaction. Her character blows up into me multiple times. I honestly wouldn’t want to be attacked like that in any other way. She’s the sweetest, funniest little character, tiny, and she just hits me from all angles all the time. I’m like, “What the hell is this little thing that just is so explosive?”

    We actually finished that fight scene…me and Colossus and her are all interactive in that one. I’m kind of taking them both on. And she’s like this little bug that has just got the biggest punch. Every time I think I’m getting ahead with Colossus, she just comes in and she gets me.

    Gina Carano: Absolutely. It’s kinda weird. She’ll get into her stance and then come at me and then pretend to hit me, and I have to take the shots or throw myself into a garbage can or a dumpster or whatever it is that I’m flying into. It was possibly the dirtiest I’ve ever been on a shoot. I get lifted up and slammed into the ground. And I’m doing it all myself, which is awesome.

    But at one point, all this dirt ends up flying up. And I was like, “Nooooo! I don’t know if I want to do this!” Andre said he saw me go through about 10 different emotions all in that one moment. Then I had to do it over and over. And I have a fear of spiders, so I was like, “Spider check!”

    I don’t know how I get to be a part of films. They just come on and keeping on messing me up. [laughs] They’re like, “Add more blood. Mess up her hair a little bit. How about some more burns?” By the time I get done…we’ll stop from one day and we’ll pick it up, and I’ll just show up just wrecked, just kind of like blood everywhere, bruises, burns. And I kinda prefer it that way. It gives it a lot of personality.


    Brianna Hildebrand as Negasonic Teenage Warhead

    Does Angel Dust fight Deadpool as well?

    Gina Carano: No. She tortures him. She’s in the creating process when he’s had his cancer and we’re now creating him and saving his life, but in a really brutal way. Have you guys gotten to go in there at all?

    Not yet.

    Gina Carano: Oh. Well that will explain a lot. [laughs]

    Are there scientists?

    Gina Carano: Yeah. Ajax did this to me, and now we do this to others. So, when you walk through there, you’ll see a bunch of people. It’s like a mental house. We just experiment and create these mutants. That’s probably my favorite arc, is that I get to be a part of creating Deadpool and making him what he is, him being like the coolest comic character and all. That’s a moment.

    Tell us about working with Ed Skrein as the antagonists of this picture.

    Gina Carano: Yeah. Ed’s so great. Ed wants to rehearse and rehearse and really go over every single beat. He’s always including our relationship. He thinks about everything while he’s got this page of dialogue. And I’m just sitting there like, “Hmm. Yeah. Glad I don’t have that paragraph! That’s a mouthful!” [laughs] He thinks about everything.

    From the moment I met Ed, his energy is so good in just kind of thinking about all the different angles. It’s really been kind of a great experience, a learning experience for me, too. We went out for sushi when I got here, and you sit there at a sushi place and you are talking about all these weird things about torturing and creating superpowers. And you look over and you are like, “I hope nobody is listening, because we just like geeked out on this story.” You’re hoping people don’t listen in because you kinda sound a little crazy. [laughs] But it’s been such a good experience.

    I’m in love with this project. There’s not one person that you’re like, “Oh, that one’s a little weird.” Maybe it’s me that’s weird. But there’s not one person that I haven’t enjoyed working with. I think in my experience with film, or fighting, or physical, or anything personal that definitely comes across on film.


    Ryan Reynolds, Gina Carano, and Ed Skrein in Deadpool

    Can you imagine staying in this world, play another character?

    Gina Carano: I would love to. I honestly would love to. I’ve gotten to the point in life where I’m like… I used to stress out about what the next job was going to be. But now I’ve gotten to the place where it always seems to work itself out. As long as you are putting in the hard work, you are getting better, you are learning, and you are putting yourself out there, I think that things end up working themselves out.

    Everybody on this crew, I think we’ve all really enjoyed working with each other. I don’t know what’s next, but I’m used to saying that for a couple years now. It will come. Whatever comes will come. If it’s another superhero or whatever it is, I’m into it.

    Having read the script, what scene are you most excited for fans to see?

    Gina Carano: I’m excited for them to see… When I read the comics, when I read Deadpool, I hear Ryan’s voice in Deadpool. You kinda feel like this is meant to be. Like he was meant to play this. This is his moment to shine. Whatever he’s been through in the Hollywood world of ups and downs, this is it. It’s so funny. But, at the same time, there’s some heart to it. I know they say that about a lot, but I really mean it. I really mean it with this script. You can actually feel it. I’m really excited to see Ryan shine.

    He’s been in this business way longer than I have. So this is his baby. So I’m really excited for people to see Ryan as Deadpool. And I hope they notice the one with the crazy hair on the eyes that’s super quiet. They’re like, “Oh, interesting.” At least interesting. [laughs]

    You mentioned Angel Dust’s different hairstyles in the time shifts. What about costume wise? What kind of gear does she wear?

    Gina Carano: Well, this is the torture montage, so I’m pretty much wearing a jumper. It’s so funny. Everyone is like, “Is that your hair or is that a wig?” I’m like, “It’s mine.” I’ve got like two clip-ins barely. And then on the other one, Andre was like, “Where should I grab your wig?” I’ve got this massive Mohawk. I was like, “Andre, that’s my hair!” [laughs] He’s like, “Oh!” Then with the clothes it’s pretty much cargo pants and there’s a bustier, kind of like movie style fight scene.

    But yeah, it’s pretty much what I used to wear when I was 16, 17 years old. So it’s not that big of a stretch for me. It’s cool though. The costume designer, Angus [Strathie], he’s incredible. He did Age of Adaline and now he’s doing this. I’m like, “Man, your range!” [laughs] To go from that to this… He’s a genius, and the sweetest man, too.

    You always get a little bit nervous with costumes. And at first I was like, “Come on, Tim! Put me in this hot superhero…” He’s like, “No, Gina. You’re going with the boyfriend cut,” the boyfriend kind of like tomboy look, which then I kinda fell in love with. It’s like back to listening to punk music… you know, Nirvana. [laughs]

    Thanks!

    I hope you have a good rest of your day.
    Premieres February 12, 2016.
    Gene Ching
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    PRC denied

    I've heard that there's a push to make a PG-13 version of this. I think that would ruin this.

    JANUARY 17, 2016 11:29pm PT by Patrick Brzeski
    'Deadpool' Denied Release in China Due to Graphic Violence

    The Ryan Reynolds anti-superhero movie has been denied permission to screen in the world's second-largest movie market.


    'Deadpool' Joe Lederer/Twentieth Century Fox

    The Ryan Reynolds anti-superhero movie has been denied permission to screen in the world's second-largest movie market.
    Fanboys worldwide are agog with anticipation for the upcoming release of Fox's R-rated 'anti-superhero' movie Deadpool — it got the most rousing reception of any title previewed at Comic Con last year — but China's censors have taken a far less enthusiastic view of the film.

    According to widespread local media reports, Deadpool, which was produced by 20th Century Fox and based on the Marvel comic book character, has been denied permission to screen in China due to its violence, nudity and graphic language.

    A source close to the decision at China Film Group tells THR that the reports are indeed accurate.

    Directed by Tim Miller and starring Ryan Reynolds as the most foul-mouthed and self-aware superhero — or, anti-hero — in the Marvel catalog, Deadpool hits theaters stateside on Feb. 12.

    China's censorship authorities often work with the Hollywood studios to create cleaned-up special cuts of R-rated movies, but sources close to the Deadpool decision say it wasn't possible to excise the offending material without causing plot problems.

    China has no ratings system, so the country's media regulator, the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT), makes an up-down judgment on all film imports, approving or banning them for consumption by Chinese viewers of all ages.

    Despite the film's more adult tone and content, many observers had predicted that Deadpool would find a way into the China market, thanks to the Marvel imprimatur.

    Movies based on Marvel comic books have done huge business in China, which is now the world's second-largest theatrical market. Avengers: Age of Ultron grossed $240 million last summer, while more offbeat titles like Guardians of the Galaxy and Ant-Man grossed $96.4 million and $105.4 million, respectively.

    Deadpool co-stars T.J. Miller, Morena Baccarin and Brianna Hildebrand. It tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson (Reynolds), who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers, adopts the alter ego Deadpool.

    20th Century Fox declined to comment.
    Gene Ching
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    Deadpool | 2 Girls 1 Punch | 20th Century FOX

    Gene Ching
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    Nice of Deadpool



    A Happy Chinese New Year wish even though PRC isn't allowing it to be distributed in there.
    Gene Ching
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    Gina crushes it

    How Budget Limitations Helped ‘Deadpool’ and Gave Us Gina Carano
    Posted on Tuesday, February 9th, 2016 by Jack Giroux



    The Deadpool embargo is no longer, and the R-rated 20th Century Fox project has garnered mostly enthusiastic reviews. The film is both a conventional and unconventional superhero movie. When its tropes are familiar, it’s still plenty of fun, but it’s the unexpected sweetness and the honest relationship that makes Deadpool stand out amongst the herd. Tim Miller‘s film finds spectacle in character, not so much massive set pieces.

    While I was interviewing Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, it became clear the budget restraints are actually the reason why audiences are seeing a genuine Deadpool movie in theaters this weekend. Read what they had to say below.

    In contrast to the big boys, this Marvel character didn’t need a budget more than $100 million. But just because this project costs half the price of some of the biggest superhero pics doesn’t mean it can’t compete with the massive scale we’re accustomed to. Miller’s action is lean and mean, with an emphasis on character and story.

    If Deadpool cost as much as X-Men: Apocalypse, we would’ve gotten a tame, PG-13 movie. To make this version of the film, though, screenwriters Reese and Wernick had to get clever with some story elements and characters, including Ajax’s right-hand woman, Angel Dust. Played by Gina Carano, she makes for an imposing, near-silent villainous presence. However, Angel Dust originally didn’t exist in the comic book adaptation, but was later included as a cost-cutting measure. Here’s what Reese told us:

    The budget certainly was [a good challenge]. The sad thing is, there was even more fun stuff that didn’t make it due to budget, but that’s life. There’s not a single Hollywood movie that’s ever been filmed where the filmmakers didn’t make the budget. For instance, we had three subordinate villains under Ajax, and we ultimately had to combine those villains into one — Angel Dust. In Angel Dust, I think we found this amazing physicality in Gina Carano. She crushes it. I don’t think we’d trade her battle with Colossus for any of those characters. Sometimes the budget means you have to make a new choice, and you fall in love with the new choice.
    Deadpool is a superhero with a lot of interior and walk-and-talk scenes, and yet it’s still very exciting to watch unfold. Wernick had this to add:

    A lot of that was because of the budget. We couldn’t have superheroes taking off, alien invasions, and all that stuff. [Laughs.] We just didn’t have the money to do it. Necessity was the mother of invention, and it really allowed us to dive deep into the characters and have fun with that.
    Because the filmmakers didn’t have to meet certain demands for a huge action movie, they were afforded time to focus on character. Clearly, based on what the screenwriters told us, the project benefited from these budget restrictions. Carano is a fun and threatening foe in the film, and her fight with Colossus is far more enjoyable than a CG city falling to pieces.

    Deadpool opens in theaters February 12th.
    "In Angel Dust, I think we found this amazing physicality in Gina Carano. She crushes it." Do you think Reese knew Gina's Gladiator name was Crush? I'm guessing no.

    We'll have our official review up here tomorrow.
    Gene Ching
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    Our latest ezine offering

    What the Hell is a DEADPOOL Anyway? By Patrick Lugo and Gene Ching
    Gene Ching
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    $135 million

    11:39 am ET
    Feb 14, 2016 BOX OFFICE
    ‘Deadpool’ Shatters Box Office Records With $135 Million Debut
    By BEN FRITZ

    The movie no studio wanted to make is destroying box office records.

    “Deadpool” has opened to a phenomenal $135 million from Thursday night through Sunday, according to studio estimates. That’s bigger than such massive superhero hits as Warner Bros. and DC’s “Man of Steel,” Marvel’s “Iron Man 2,” and all of 20th Century Fox’s “X-Men” movies.

    The irony: “Deadpool,” a spin-off character in Marvel’s X-Men comic book universe, was produced by Fox, but only after years of fruitless development. That’s because the loud-mouthed, ultra-violent character required a film with an R-rating, a very high death count, and an insulting sense of humor about his own genre. Executives were concerned the movie would turn off most fans of PG-13 rated fare such as “The Avengers” and appeal only to the Comic-Con crowd.

    That’s why the movie, when eventually approved following fan excitement over leaked footage, was budgeted at a conservative $58 million, less than a third of the cost of most super-hero films.

    But “Deadpool,” starring Ryan Reynolds. has instead turned into a blockbuster, drawing fans apparently desperate for something new in their super-hero movies. After just over three days, it has destroyed the prior box office record for President’s Day weekend, $93 million for “Fifty Shades of Grey” last year. By the time the holiday weekend ends Monday, “Deadpool” will likely have grossed more than $150 million.
    Well played. Excellent ad campaign. I still wasn't that into it. Anyone else see it yet?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Well played. Excellent ad campaign. I still wasn't that into it. Anyone else see it yet?
    Caught it yesterday. It was funny. Probably about twenty minutes too long, and pretty shallow, but funny-and in a way I've never seen in a Marvel movie-more like "Clerks II."

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    Gotta give it up for Deadpool

    I was painfully unimpressed by this film, but I loved the ad campaigns.

    Deadpool overflows global box office thanks to snark and social-media savvy

    In this week’s roundup of the global box-office scene:
    • Gobby X-Men offshoot sets records for R-rated, February and Fox debuts
    • Stephen Chow’s The Mermaid conquers Chinese new-year box office, as the country sets a global high for single-week takings
    • Zoolander 2 struggles to repeat the Anchorman effect


    Quip-fire personality … Ryan Reynolds in Deadpool. Photograph: Joe Lederer/AP
    Phil Hoad @phlode
    Tuesday 16 February 2016 10.45 EST Last modified on Tuesday 16 February 2016 10.47 EST

    The new superhero

    On the back of a smug trailer and palpable levels of fanboy thigh-rubbing, superhero spinoff Deadpool was tracking at $55-60m late last month for its debut weekend. So how, three weeks later, did Fox unearth a crazy $135m (£94m) – the biggest February opening, biggest R-rated opening and biggest for the studio (more than all the X-Men films, from whose universe Deadpool hails)? The film itself is no game-changer, mostly sticking to the origin-story template, albeit frothing it up with a little nutzoid attitude. But its performance, making sequels inevitable, looks as if it could be; a dizzyingly high figure for R-rated material, surely the result of tireless geek mobilisation on social media that deployed viral-friendly marketing (such as its emoji-based billboard) and a star willing to go to bat for the film 24/7. Ryan Reynolds, after the failure of 2011’s Green Lantern, had ample motivation, and the quip-fire personality he’s always maintained on Twitter dovetailed perfectly with Deadpool’s tone.

    The unexpected size of Deadpool’s success suggests one of those serendipitous, unplannable alignments of material and audience. A loquacious, fourth wall-disregarding, Spandex-clad id mirroring and stimulating 21st-century digital culture in all its dismissive hyperactivity. The film also provides sarky respite from the serious superhero films that have dominated blockbusters since Batman Begins. It’s meta and mildly deconstructionist, but not as ideologically so as fellow R-rated costumed caper Watchmen, whose domestic take ($107m) Deadpool has bested in a single weekend. Conforming to the expected superhero beats and maintaining loose connections to the X-Men universe, Deadpool also required less in the way of introduction than Kick-Ass – its closest cousin in potty-mouthed crimefighting. On a $58m budget, it had far more in the way of marketing cash than either Kick-Ass 1 or 2 – which only did $48.1m and $28.7m respectively in the US.

    Deadpool will be looking at $150m by the end of the four-day President’s day holiday. It didn’t start quite as strongly internationally as Fifty Shades of Grey, whose February US debut record it has overturned. But, promisingly, it’s outrunning last year’s similarly genre-subverting Kingsman: The Secret Service in all territories so far – and that film went on to do $286.1m globally; $74m of that was Chinese box office, which Deadpool will have to do without, as the country’s censors have baulked on account of graphic violence (odd, as Kingsman wasn’t exactly light on it). It’ll have to be content with shaking down Hong Kong, $3.8m this weekend, and $12.3m from Russia – perhaps the standout result from the international rollout. The first big surprise package of the year, Deadpool is a tough act for Warner Bros’ similarly middle-finger-extending Suicide Squad to follow in August.

    The Chinese new-year winner

    The Mermaid trailer
    Just as impressive as Deadpool’s bullseye is the $109m Chinese weekend figure for Stephen Chow’s eco-comedy The Mermaid. It actually opened last Monday to a record $40.9m first day, and has powered on ever since. A Hong Kong veteran known for his mo lei tau (nonsensical) style of comedy, his early noughties films Shaolin Soccer and Kung Fu Hustle started to win him international audiences; and with the Chinese market expanding in the latter half of the decade, he has been well-placed to capitalise, 2013’s Journey to the West taking $196.7m (currently the country’s 12th highest-grossing film). The Mermaid – about a honeytrap scheme launched by a tribe of mermaids under threat from a greedy business tycoon – looks firmly in keeping with Chow’s fastidiously detailed cartoon humour. And, significantly, it’s a cut above local mainstream fare: according to Variety, “it’s increasingly rare to find a mainland Chinese blockbuster in which one is so swept up by the rich storyline and the charismatic cast that the technical aspects don’t even seem to matter”. On a current $260m running total after seven days, it’s already China’s second highest-grossing local film ever, with another $130m or so to go to beat the current champion, last year’s Monster Hunt.

    With the other two New Year bruisers – Chow Yun-fat’s gambling caper From Vegas to Macau 3 and mythological sequel The Monkey King 2 – also surging over the $100m mark, it’s going to be a historic month at the Chinese box office. Last Monday’s total $100.5m haul was the single biggest day ever there; 78% over 2015’s New Year opening. The week’s $548m is a global record for a single territory, beating North America’s $529.6m at the end of December 2015 when The Force Awakens was riding high. Incredibly, that’s more than the country’s annual total a decade ago. February last year was the first ever month in which China outgrossed the US. Technically, it didn’t beat North America, the US + Canada entity used by film distributors, but that is surely a done deal this year. Let’s hope The Mermaid gets some proper global exposure (it is released in the UK and Australia this coming weekend) and boosts the Chinese industry’s rep quality-wise, too.

    The comeback

    The return of Derek Zoolander met with a $15.7m No 4 US debut: stumbling on the spring ’16 catwalk, in other words. Distributor Paramount can’t really be faulted for choosing to open against Deadpool, as no one else anticipated that meteor-streak. But it’s likely the film has taken a hit, with the youth audience voting en masse for the Merc with a Mouth, despite a marketing campaign for Zoolander 2 that was just as noisy. With the original Zoolander performing tepidly in 2001 before mustering a coalition of cult fans on DVD etc, it was an open question whether 2016’s 18-25s would actually be hot for Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson. Paramount presumably hoped to muster the kind of repeat business they enjoyed with Anchorman 2 ($173.6m) – another reprisal of a slow-burning original. But the first Anchorman was almost twice as successful at the box office as the first Zoolander, and the sequel caught star Will Ferrell amid a chain of hits; Stiller and Wilson, in contrast, have been subdued presences since the mid-noughties. So Zoolander 2 is unsurprisingly charting under Anchorman 2 in key territories such as the UK (Z2: $2.7m; A2: $7.4m) and Australia (Z2: $2.5m; A2: $4.6m), which supplied over half of its $8.5m overseas start. With DVD looking as old-hat as Von Dutch these days, and the market immeasurably more crowded than 15 years ago, it’s doubtful whether Zoolander 2 can expect a home-video reprieve.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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    continued from previous

    Beyond Hollywood

    Aside from China’s new-year-blockbuster trident, nothing new. South Korea’s holiday offering, prison comedy thriller A Violent Prosecutor, held up well, taking it to $54m – just outside the homegrown all-time top 10 for the country.

    The future

    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny - Trailer
    Zip next weekend on the global-release front. Ahead of an internet release that’s already got the goat of major US theatre chains, Netflix and the Weinstein Company release their followup to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in cinemas in China. Sword of Destiny – drawn also from Wang Dulu’s Crane-Iron wuxia series, and directed by the original’s legendary action-choreographer Yuen Woo-ping – will be hoping for a smoother passage in the east than the 2000 Ang Lee masterpiece. That film found itself censored by the authorities and paid the price box office-wise for being ahead of the curve in relinking the Hong Kong industry with mainland Mandarin culture, while confusing both. But it banged the gong in splendid style for Chinese film-making internationally as the country was beginning to open up. If Sword of Destiny can rustle up even half of its $213.5m take, then that would confirm, after Beasts of No Nation, another new epoch: that of Netflix and the web-release window. In India, meanwhile, Anil Kapoor’s daughter Sonam looks to build on her role in last year’s Salman Khan smash Prem Ratan Dhan Payo with the lead in this week’s based-on-real-events thriller Neerja. She plays the flight attendant murdered trying to save passengers in a 1986 Karachi hijacking. Distributor Fox Star, local subsidiary of the Hollywood giant, are also hoping to get 2016 off to a sturdy start after making noticeable in-roads into Bollywood last year.

    Top 10 global box office, 12-14 February

    1. (New) Deadpool, $260m from 62 territories – 48.1% international; 51.9% US
    2. (New) The Mermaid, $109m from four territories. $260m cum – 100% int
    3. (New) The Monkey King 2, $38m from nine territories. $113.2m cum – 99.9% int; 0.1% US
    4. (New) From Vegas to Macau 3, $36.1m from eight territories. $120.3m cum – 99.7% int; 0.3% US
    5. Kung Fu Panda 3, $34.3m from eight territories. $256.1m cum – 63.3% int; 36.7% US
    6. (New) How to Be Single, $26.9m from 41 territories – 30.2% int; 69.8% US
    7. (New) Zoolander 2, $24.2m from 21 territories – 35.2% int; 64.8% US
    8. The Revenant, $20.9m from 67 territories. $361.2m cum – 55.9% int; 44.1% US
    9. Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip, $15.6m from 53 territories. $192.2m cum – 56.3% int; 43.7% US
    10. A Violent Prosecutor, $11m from one territory. $54m cum – 100% int

    • Thanks to Rentrak. This week’s figures are based on estimates; all historical figures unadjusted, unless otherwise stated.

    The Mermaid

    The Monkey King 2
    Kung Fu Panda 3
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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