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Thread: Chinese and HK Television Series

  1. #16
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    The Rise of Phoenixes

    Netflix is killing it with foreign TV series that they rebrand as Netflix. I totally got into La Casa de Papel (Money Heist) which is a Spanish TV series now under the Netflix banner.

    Netflix hopes Chinese TV series ‘The Rise of Phoenixes’ takes off globally
    The 70-part historical drama – filmed in Mandarin but to be released in more than 12 languages – features film stars Chen Kun and Ni Ni in leading roles
    BY AYDEE TIE
    30 AUG 2018



    The new Chinese television series, The Rise of Phoenixes, which was filmed in Mandarin, will be released in more than a dozen languages to Netflix users around the world on September 14.

    Thanks to the success of another 2018 historical drama, Story of Yanxi Palace, released around the world by the Chinese streaming service iQiyi, Netflix has high hopes for its new Chinese period drama.


    Actress Ni Ni as Feng Zhiwei (left) who hides her identity by dressing as a man, in a scene from ‘The Rise of the Phoenixes’

    Based on the novel Huang Quan (which loosely translates as “Power of the Phoenix”) by Tianxia Guiyan, the 2018 drama stars Chen Kun as Ning Yi, the shrewd, ambitious and calculating sixth prince of the Tiansheng Kingdom.

    Ni Ni plays the role of Feng Zhiwei, the undervalued daughter of the Qiu family – in reality the last princess of the fallen Cheng dynasty – who hides her true identity by dressing as a man to survive in the male-dominated society.


    Chen Kun (right) as Prince Ning Yi in a scene from the Chinese television series ‘The Rise of the Phoenixes’.

    Like many Chinese dramas, The Rise of Phoenixes tells a story focused on power, desire, lust and love between people from different kingdoms in ancient China, including some who are determined to claim the position of “The Great Phoenix”.


    Actresses Ou Wang (left) as the female general Hua Qiong and Ni Ni as Feng Zhiwei in a scene from the television series ‘The Rise of the Phoenixes’.

    This series marks not only the television debut of Ni, 30, who has enjoyed success in major films, but also the highly anticipated return to the small screen of Chen, 42, after a decade away pursing a film career.

    The series also features other big names from the Mandarin-language film and television industries including directors Shen Yan and Liu Haibo, who both worked on the 2016 comedy-drama television series, Chinese Style Relationship, and William Chang known for his work as artistic director and costume designer on the Wong Kar-wai films The Grandmaster, In the Mood for Love and Ashes of Time.


    Chen Kun as Prince Ning Yi with his guards in a scene from ‘The Rise of the Phoenixes’

    The Rise of Phoenixes is a 70-episode series, which has been co-produced by Netflix along with Croton Media (China Syndication), K. Pictures, Hao Mai Culture, iQiyi, COL Group and New Film Association.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #17
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    More restrictions on PRC TV

    I must have clicked on that Netflix The Rise of Phoenixes icon a half dozen times over the weekend. Didn't watch it though. Maybe soon.

    SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 10:04PM PT
    China Readies Law Restricting Foreign Television Content
    By PATRICK FRATER
    Asia Bureau Chief


    CREDIT: REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

    The Chinese government is moving forward with plans to restrict foreign content on broadcast television and online video platforms.

    The National Radio and Television Administration published drafts of new regulations Thursday. These are normally open to industry and public discussion for a period of 30 days.

    The draft regulations will limit foreign content to 30% of daily airtime on all channels, and banish it completely from evening prime time, defined as 7-10 p.m.

    The stated objective is to exclude content that presents as violence, terrorism, incitement to crime, and a threat to social stability and national sentiment. It is also intended to prevent content that “deviates from socialist core values.” The draft particularly targets foreign current affairs shows, but its scope also includes feature film and animation.

    This is the first legislation introduced by the new regulatory body since oversight of the media and entertainment sector was shifted to the propaganda department of the Communist Party in March. But it fits with an established pattern of growing conservatism by Chinese media regulators, and also with expanded central government controls over the Internet.

    In the past few months, new restrictions have been placed on live streaming and online gaming. China’s version of satirical show “Saturday Night Live” was temporarily taken off the air in the summer, and political satire is increasingly less welcome.

    Zhuang Rongwen, who in August was appointed as head of the Cyberspace Administration of China, recently set out a similarly robust approach. Writing last month in political magazine Qiushi, he called for a “people’s war” and plans to rehabilitate China’s “cyber ecology.” He proposed the promotion of “positive energy” and the suppression of negative elements including wrong ideological trends, unflattering portrayals of China’s leaders and unapproved versions of China’s history.

    The agency this month took measures to block the website and online application of Australia’s public broadcaster, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. It joins Bloomberg, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal in a group of overseas news organizations unavailable to ordinary Chinese web users.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    Yanxi Palace

    Yanxi Palace: The most Googled show on Earth
    23 December 2018


    The Story of Yanxi Palace revolves around its female protagonist, Wei Yingluo

    It has love but also hatred, intrigue, revenge, poisoning rivals and even killing babies.

    The Chinese drama Story of Yanxi Palace is the most Googled TV show of 2018 globally, despite Google being largely blocked in the country.

    The search engine's analytics suggested that the top interest in the drama has come from Asian regions like Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei and Hong Kong, but its popularity in mainland China has been overwhelming as well.

    The series has been streamed more than 15 billion times on iQiyi, China's Netflix-like site where the show premiered in July before it reached domestic TV channels and more than 70 markets abroad. It was the most watched online drama in China for 39 consecutive days over the summer.

    The 70-episode Story of Yanxi Palace fictionalised the power struggles among the concubines of Emperor Qianlong in the 1700s.

    The protagonist, a smart girl with a humble background, manages to rise through the ranks among the harem and wins both love and respect from the emperor.


    The Chinese title of Yanxi Palace appears as the most Googled TV show of 2018

    Its theme may be likened to a Cinderella tale or Netflix's The Crown that chronicles the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. But its own uniqueness has made it the undisputed entertainment sensation of the year.

    Here's how it took over China and its neighbouring regions.

    It catches up with a trend of feminist shows

    The heroine of the show, Wei Yingluo, is unlike most traditional Chinese female characters who are taught to be tolerant, submissive and fragile.

    Inspired by the actual real-life consort of Emperor Qianlong, the story follows Yingluo as a woman of Chinese Han ethnicity in the Qing dynasty - the last imperial dynasty in China ruled by the Manchurian ethnicity that suppressed the Han people.

    But her intelligence, determination and appropriate ferocity meant she was eventually granted her the title of imperial noble consort, the highest possible position for a Han person at that time.

    Yingluo's most famous line from the show goes like this : "I, Wei Yingluo, am naturally hot-tempered and not to be pushed around. Whoever keeps talking [nonsense], I have all kinds of methods to go against her."


    Wei Yingluo started off as a servant in the palace but slowly worked her way up

    The woman she is based on - Xiaoyichun - was posthumously given the title of empress, making her the only Han empress during the Manchu-reigned dynasty.

    The show comes as the latest example of how feminist-themed soap operas have captured Chinese audiences.

    Other shows like The Legend of Zhenhuan - another imperial rising-up-the-ranks story bought by Netflix - and The Empress of China, that tells the story of the only female emperor in Chinese history, have also taken off in China.

    It didn't face much censorship

    Before the show aired on TV screens, it was shown online.

    The co-producer and initial distributor of the series, iQiyi, is one of China's most popular online video platforms - helping the show gain large traffic and, more importantly, easier regulatory scrutiny for its debut.

    In China, the National Radio and Television Administration oversees all content on radio and television. A TV project has to obtain the go-ahead from it even before shooting starts.

    When video sites emerged a few years ago, they could publish anything as long as they thought it was within the regulator's rules.

    In 2016, an online series featuring gay love went viral but was taken off in the middle of the streaming season. A year later, a a ban on ****sexual content was issued.

    Online video platforms can't broadcast shows at will but the censorship they go through is much lighter than TV channels, which are mostly owned by the government.

    Low-cost cast, high-quality production

    No actor in the show is very famous, except for one Hong Kong actress, Charmaine Sheh, who was willing to play a supporting role.

    Gong Yu, founder and CEO of iQiyi, said the company had "deliberately cast lesser known actors... rejecting recent trends in the Chinese industry that put too much emphasis of the celebrity appeal of actors in their productions".

    It came at an essential time when Chinese celebrities' high income and ambiguous tax practices had caught the attention of the authorities.

    Total spending on the show's cast didn't even reach one tenth of the total production cost, according to Chinese magazine Portrait citing series producer Yu Zheng, who added that the rest of the money was mainly spent on things like costume and make-up.


    The detailed costumes and intricate sets won over audiences

    The well-built sets, elaborate costumes, make-up and attention to detail have won viewers' love.

    For example, concubines in the show wear three earrings on each side, as was the tradition of Manchu women at that time.

    So if you've never heard of Yanxi Palace, you could try Googling it - you wouldn't be the first.
    I watched a little bit of The Rise of Phoenixes on Netflix. It was gorgeous with the sets and costumes but too soap-opera-esque to hold my interest.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #19
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    Green Door

    Netflix Acquires Taiwanese Series 'Green Door'
    2:10 AM PDT 3/15/2019 by Patrick Brzeski


    Courtesy of Netflix
    'Green Door'

    Although blocked in mainland China, the global streamer has been upping its collection of Chinese-language content.
    Netflix has picked up global streaming rights to Taiwanese horror-thriller series Green Door.

    The six-episode Chinese-language series is adapted from Taiwanese author Joseph Chen's novel of the same title. The show follows troubled psychologist Wei Sung-Yen (played by Jam Hsiao), who returns from the U.S. to set up his own practice in Taiwan, where mysterious patients and uncanny events shed light on his murky past.

    Green Door is directed by Lingo Hsieh (aka Xie Tingwei), known for her fantasy-horror movie The Bride (2014), which she co-created with Japanese horror specialist Takashige Ichise. Green Door was adapted for the screen by Hsieh and Li Ting-yu. Ying-Hsuan Hsieh, who won the best actress prize at last year's Golden Horse Awards, co-stars.

    The series first aired on Taiwan's Public Television Service earlier this year.

    Netflix is unable to operate within mainland China because of Beijing's ban on direct foreign content channels in the country. But the company has been modestly boosting its collection of high-profile Chinese-language content to build its userbase in Hong Kong and Taiwan, as well as among the large global Chinese diaspora audience.

    In recent months, Netflix has acquired global rights to Chinese sci-fi blockbuster The Wandering Earth, teen thriller Animal World and romantic drama Us and Them; and the company pre-bought international rights to Chinese animated feature Over the Moon, set to be directed by veteran animator Glen Keane (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) for Shanghai's Pearl Studio (formerly Oriental DreamWorks). Netflix also scooped up Taiwanese sleeper hit Dear Ex and several mainland Chinese TV dramas, including Youku's detective series Day and Night and iQiyi's remake of Sony Pictures Television’s psychological thriller Chosen.
    Not sure if there's any martial arts connection in this, but we have discussed The Wandering Earth and Animal World.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  5. #20

    Heaven s

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...PFbLXr0mTBazWy

    Jin Yong adaptation of Heaven Sword and Dragon Sabre 2019.

    https://youtu.be/3ros_wHjgdE

  6. #21
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    netflix

    Netflix Expands Chinese Content With Series, Film Additions
    By PATRICK FRATER
    Asia Bureau Chief


    CREDIT: COURTESY OF CHANGHE FILMS

    Global streaming giant Netflix is growing its Chinese-language content with six new licensed titles. These will arrive on the service in the second half of 2019.

    Netflix is not permitted by China to operate its video streaming platform there. But it nevertheless perceives an appetite for Chinese-language content that can be accessed by international audiences, viewers in Chinese-speaking parts of Asia, and overseas Chinese. Netflix’s first Chinese-language original series are expected to launch over the next few months, including “Nowhere Man,” “Triad Princess,” and “The Ghost Bride.”

    The six upcoming Chinese-language licensed series and films lean heavily on productions from Taiwan and Hong Kong. They include an expansion of “A Thousand Goodnights,” from Taiwan’s Sanlih TV; the previously announced pickup of Taiwanese art house thriller “Cities of Last Things”; and”Sexy Central,” a female-led drama from Hong Kong’s China 3D Digital.

    “Goodnights,” the story of a daughter carrying out her father’s wish, discovering her roots and embarking on a journey around Taiwan, is already available on the platform. Episodes 11-20 will launch on Aug. 10. “Cities” is an award-winning dystopian thriller, told in reverse chronological order, that launched at the Toronto festival last September. It will be available on Netflix from Thursday.

    “Pili Fantasy: War of Dragons,” Season 1, is a popular glove puppetry show from Taiwan that has run since 1988. The first season depicts a story where turmoil looms in the Martial World, and the Eight Wonders of the Evil Dragon unleashes dark forces. The show is licensed from Pili International Multimedia, and available on Netflix from Friday.

    The “Mayday Life” fact-based movie follows Taiwanese mega-band Mayday on its “Life Tour” concert series, recorded live in 55 cities and 122 shows. Shot over two years across four continents, the show attempts to link together four stories. The movie chronicles the beginnings of one of Asia’s biggest and most popular bands, allows viewers along for the ride, and reflects upon life and friendship. Licensed from B’in Music, “Mayday” will be available on Netflix in August.

    “Til Death Do Us Part,” licensed from MirrorFiction, is a suspenseful anthology series spanning seven stories that explore one’s fears and desires when everything we have is at stake. It will be available on Netflix from Aug. 15.

    Over the past year, Netflix has acquired Chinese-language content including films and TV series including “Dear Ex,” “Green Door,” “Us and Them,” mainland Chinese sci-fi hit film “The Wandering Earth,” “Meteor Garden” “The Defected,” “On Children,” and “The Rise of Phoenixes.”
    THREADS
    Chollywood rising
    Chinese and HK Television Series
    Gene Ching
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  7. #22
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    Myolie Wu

    Sort of random but it's a slow KFM news day

    Actress Myolie Wu says working at TVB was like training at Shaolin Temple
    By KENNETH CHAW
    TV
    Tuesday, 29 Sep 2020
    2:02 PM MYT


    The heaviest workload she experienced was working 20 hours a day and barely getting any time left to sleep. Photo: Myolie Wu/Instagram

    Myolie Wu is undoubtedly one of the most recognisable TVB actresses of the 2000s. But Wu revealed there was a lot of blood, sweat and tears that went into carving an illustrious career.

    The 40-year-old is currently taking part in the Mainland China reality series Everybody Stand By, where established actors including Vicki Zhao compete to be named "Best Actor" by famed directors through a series of tasks.

    Prior to the competition, Wu gave an interview, summarising her showbiz journey so far.

    Wu, who won third place at Miss Hong Kong 1999, said she entered showbiz as a way to lighten her family's financial burden.

    "My father had just retired. I was the youngest in the family and I didn't want to depend on my family members for money."

    After the pageant, Wu was signed to TVB for 16 years, where she often played the "happy-go-lucky, younger sister roles". She left in 2015.

    "There was no choice. Whatever role the company wanted me to play, I played. Even towards the end, it was like this. But that's how it is for everyone."

    She added the heaviest workload she experienced was working 20 hours a day and barely getting any time left to sleep.

    Still, Wu is grateful for the experience she had:

    "At the same time, having this experience was a good thing. I feel like my time there was like being trained at Shaolin Temple. When you get out, you're not afraid of anything."
    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
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    ‘Legacy’ and ‘Trinity of Shadows’

    Apr 20, 2021 5:39am PT
    WarnerMedia Readies Chinese-Language Original Series ‘Legacy’ and ‘Trinity of Shadows’


    By Patrick Frater


    WarnerMedia
    WarnerMedia has set up two Chinese-language series that will debut later this year. Period drama series “Legacy” hails from mainland China, while crime drama “Trinity of Shadows” is a three-way venture involving partners from Taiwan and Hong Kong.

    “Legacy” is a 1920s-set drama that chronicles the lives of the wealthy Yi family and three sisters who vie to inherit their father’s shopping mall business. In a time of upheaval and uncertainty, the three sisters set aside their differences to keep the business afloat and save their family.

    Zheng Yu, director of the smash hit series “Yanxi Place,” is credited as creator of the show which is produced by Huan Yu Entertainment.

    Together, they have re-assembled several key cast from “Yanxi Palace” including Qin Lan, Wu Jinyan and Yuan Nie. The series also stars Han Geng (“Ex-Files”), Liu Jun (“All is Well”), Miao Pu (“The Rise of the Tang Empire”) and Zhang Nan (“The Legend of Haolan”).

    Legacy will premiere exclusively on WarnerMedia’s regional streaming service HBO Go at an unspecified date later in 2021.

    “We’ve been ramping up our Mandarin series recently and ‘Legacy’ promises to be a binge-worthy addition to our growing originals slate,” said Magdalene Ew, WarnerMedia’s head of content – entertainment, southeast Asia, in a prepared statement. “It’s one of those shows that has truly something for everyone. It promises intrigue, suspense and romance, all with the backdrop of a fascinating time in China’s history.”

    “Trinity of Shadows” comprises 15 one-hour episodes. The first two will launch on June 13, 2021, and be followed every subsequent Sunday with further instalments. The series will play on HBO Go and HBO in Asia. In Taiwan, the series will also simulcast on the Catchplay Plus streaming service.

    The show is presented by WarnerMedia, Catchplay and HKTVE, the PCCW-owned company that operates free-to-air TV channels ViuTV and English-language ViuTVsix in Hong Kong.

    The series is about a murder investigation which has similarities to a cold case from three years ago. During the investigation, the lead detective (played by Sandrine Pinna), an up-and-coming public official (Kaiser Chuang) and rookie policeman (Liu Kuan-ting) are drawn together into a dark labyrinth of power play.

    ‘Trinity’ was produced by David Tang (“The Long Goodbye,” “Who Killed Cock Robin?”) and directed by Hong Bo-Hao (“Dad’s Suit,” “Wake Up” S2). The screenwriter is Huang Chien-Ming (“Scoundrels,” “Wake Up”). The series also introduces Stanley Yau, a member of Hong Kong pop sensation Mirror.

    Other HBO Asia Originals in production this year include: the mystery series “Forbidden,” currently in production in Thailand; action-fantasy series “Halfworlds” season 3 produced in the Philippines; and horror anthology “Folklore” season 2, which is filmed across seven different Asian countries and territories, including Taiwan
    Amazon Prime has an insane amount of Asian TV series.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #24
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    youtube is a great place to watch Chinese TV if you have an add blocker to block the commercials

    I save playlists with english subtitles

    I usually just save shows that are based in older times ~ but there are thousands more to choose from

    https://www.youtube.com/user/7nothin...=dd&shelf_id=0
    .
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  10. #25
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    Chinatown (唐人街)

    Ruco Chan, Joel Chan, and Philip Ng Film Fight Scenes for “Chinatown”
    By huynh on April 26, 2019 in NEWS

    Upcoming TVB action-filled drama Chinatown <唐人街> stars Ruco Chan (陳展鵬), Joel Chan (陳山聰), and Philip Ng (伍允龍). As the drama requires many shirtless fighting scenes, the three actors have been actively dieting and exercising to ensure showing their best forms yet.

    In addition, Joel and Philip expressed that they had reduced their water intake for the past several days in order to decrease water weight and bloating. During an interview in between filming recently, Joel shared, “The scene we are filming right now is a messy fighting scene among eight people. Afterward, I will be fighting with Ruco. After filming these scenes, I’ve got to eat a pineapple bun to make up for it! I do want to continue maintaining this figure though. However, I would definitely relax and let loose a little more. The worst thing, though, is that my topless scene is at the very end [of the filming schedule]. That means I’ll have to continue this strict diet and exercise routine!”

    Philip, who is the only one of the three to have a martial arts background, was asked to critique Joel’s skills. Philip said, “Actually, everyone does their action scenes very well. Joel and I were very compatible and had a lot of chemistry during our fighting scene. We did our parts very comfortably! It is not surprising that the men in this drama are doing their fight scenes well. What I couldn’t foresee was that Natalie Tong (唐詩詠) also fought very well!”

    First-time father Ruco has been busy caring for his wife, Phoebe Sin (單文柔), as well their new baby girl, Quinta. On whether this had caused him to neglect training and preparing for his role, Ruco candidly expressed, “Of course it has! I’m doing my best though. I have five days of filming fighting scenes. I have tried using their dieting methods before, but I couldn’t do it. Cutting out fat in my diet makes my body temperature decrease and I constantly feel cold. Since I have to film every day, a strict diet like that will make me faint!”



    A dated report - not sure if this is available in the U.S. yet but I'm catching up with Philip Ng and he mentioned it.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #26
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    Word of Honor

    Netflix Chinese wuxia series Word of Honor is equal parts beauty, violence and heroics
    Zhang Zhehan plays the boss of a gang of assassins, who decides to commit slow-motion suicide
    He searches for the powerful Glazed Armour, and wanders the kingdom disguised as a beggar
    Stephen McCarty

    Published: 9:45am, 20 Jun, 2021


    A still from Netflix’s Word of Honor, an action-packed wuxia series. Photo: Netflix
    Some Chinese historical fables nail it from the start: those that pull off the considerable trick of keeping the romance, martial arts, elaborate costumes, imposing sets and myth-laden fantasy in equilibrium.
    Word of Honor (Netflix, series one now available) achieves all this with ease, balancing bloodshed and cherry blossom, horrors and heroics, for the duration of this latest wuxia epic. (And at 36 episodes it certainly qualifies as an epic. Season two, whenever that arrives, will burnish its legacy.)
    Flying swords – and swordsmen – kick things off during an attack on a Forbidden City-style stronghold, the masked assassins’ slick moves offering the first of many examples of The Matrix-flavoured fight scenes’ fancy footwork. But rather than revel in another victory and his own death-dealing derring-do, the bad guys’ boss, Zhou Zishu (Zhang Zhehan), has an epiphany.
    In the service of Prince Jin, Zhou has left a messy trail of blood, guts and broken heads, so as a penance he takes a sort of self-flagellating drastic action: slow-motion suicide. This he initiates by driving into himself the Nails of Seven Torments, bringing about a form of prolonged torture that will kill him after a few years. But – and here’s the crafty part from a scriptwriting point of view – so far, only six have been applied, hinting at last-minute redemption later on for the previously implacable slasher.

    A still from Word of Honor. Photo: Netflix
    Add to all this the search for the Glazed Armour – a type of key that will open a long-lost armoury, which in turn will make the troops in charge of it invincible (it’s the nuclear stockpile of the day) – and the stage is set for a fanciful blockbuster in a series of striking settings. And who cares if the Ghost Valley and Mirror Lake Manor are merely CGI inventions?
    But wait! There’s more. Zhou, plagued by his conscience, adopts a disguise (of Mission: Impossible standard) and begins wandering the kingdom like a beggar, fooling everyone until his martial-arts skills become too obvious to ignore. At this point he is given the glad eye by the white-robed Wen Kexing (Gong Jun), which marks the beginning of a bromance often conducted in soft focus, contrasting with the fury of the fight scenes.
    Based on the novel Tian Ya Ke, by Priest, Word of Honor was put together with limited resources, yet looks and feels like a big-budget production. The cast and crew, one might say, have nailed it.
    by Priest? Anyone know this wuxia?
    Gene Ching
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  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    by Priest? Anyone know this wuxia?
    There are several prolific e-book writers that use the Priest nom-de-plume but the following one is probably her:

    https://tian-ya-ke.carrd.co/#author

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