Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 43 of 43

Thread: Chinese Bridges

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    3d? Wth?

    This is like playing Grand Theft Auto while carjacking.

    3D glass bridge over Yellow River becomes instant hit
    Han Jing
    14:00 UTC+8, 2017-10-18
    An eye-catching all glass-decked bridge spanning the Yellow River in Zhongwei city of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region has opened to the public.





    The thrilling bridge has quickly become the latest Internet sensation as it is also China’s first 3D glass bridge. Visitors can enjoy lifelike 3D images on the glass floor from certain angles as they cross it.






    The bridge measures 2.6 meters in width and 210 meters in length, and it hangs 10 meters from the surface of the rushing river. Each piece of glass can bear a load of three-tons.




    Source: SHINE Editor: Han Jing
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    World's Longest Glass Bottom Bridge Opens in North China

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge

    March 29, 2018
    A bridge so far: China's controversial megaproject
    March 29, 2018


    A bridge to somewhere: The project linking Hong Kong, Macau and mainland china is 55 kilometres long and contains enough steel to build 60 Eiffel Towers

    Touted as an engineering wonder, the world's longest sea bridge, which connects Hong Kong, Macau and mainland China, includes a snaking road crossing and an underwater tunnel and reportedly uses enough steel to build 60 Eiffel Towers.

    Nine years after construction began on the 55-kilometre (34-mile) crossing, a preview organised by the Chinese government this week offered a first peek into the megaproject.

    The bridge will link Hong Kong to the southern Chinese city of Zhuhai and the gambling enclave of Macau, cutting across the waters of the Pearl River Estuary.

    Although the opening date has not been confirmed, officials expect the bridge to be in use for 120 years and say it will boost business by cutting travel time by 60 percent.

    The 420,000 tonnes of steel used for the project represent 60 times the amount used in the Eiffel Tower, China's official Xinhua news agency said.

    Gao Xinglin, the bridge's project planning manager, said the construction of the 6.7-kilometre underwater tunnel gave him sleepless nights.

    "There were many nights where I couldn't fall asleep, because there were too many difficulties during the construction," Gao told reporters Wednesday.

    "Linking the 80,000-tonne pipes under the sea with watertight technology was the most challenging," he added.


    The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge project.

    The total price tag for the project, which includes artificial islands, linked roads and new border-crossing facilities, is unclear but some estimates run to over 100 billion yuan ($15.1 billion), leading critics to slam it as a costly white elephant.

    Opponents in Hong Kong say the project is part of Beijing's drive to tighten its grip on the semi-autonomous city.

    Dogged by delays, budget overruns, accusations of corruption and the deaths of construction workers, the bridge failed to open by the end of 2017 as hoped.

    There have also been safety concerns after 19 lab workers were charged over faking concrete test reports, with one man jailed last December.


    Eyes right: Cars will have to change sides of the road when they get into Hong Kong, which drives on the left


    The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge was nine years in the making


    The crossing is not in use yet, but is expected to cut travel times by up to 60 percent


    For whom the toll booths? There will be a charge for driving from Zhuhai to Hong Kong


    The world's longest sea bridge will not be a place for pedestrians when it finally opens
    The only time I ever rode in a hovercraft was between Hong Kong and Macau. It was cool.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Bridge collapse

    I love that no one was fazed.

    Crowded Chinese bridge caves in under weight of tourist numbers
    Spectators at Guangdong dragon boat race appeared unfazed and continued to walk along the crossing

    PUBLISHED : Friday, 05 October, 2018, 4:58pm
    UPDATED : Friday, 05 October, 2018, 4:58pm
    COMMENTS: 2
    Simone McCarthy



    A pedestrian bridge crowded with sightseers caved in during a dragon boat race in southern China.

    “There were a lot of people crowded on the bridge today, and the deck bent down,” a staff member told Beijing Time. “No one was hurt.”

    Video footage shot after the collapse on Wednesday showed visitors to the Green Sand Island park in Foshan, Guangdong continuing to cross the bridge after it had been bent into a deep V-shape over the waterway.

    The bridge was eventually evacuated for repairs and reopened the following day, park staff told local media.

    The incident occurred as the number of tourists visiting attractions across China are surging during the nation’s national holiday week, a period when hundreds of millions of people are on the move within the country.

    Last year, the number of “golden week” travellers totalled 705 million, around half the nation’s population, according to the China National Tourism Administration.
    THREADS
    China's National Day & Golden Week
    Chinese Bridges
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park

    Lucky Tourist Crosses Terrifying Gap Bridge in China as Safety Rope Breaks Off
    by Carl Samson 1 day ago


    A male tourist in central China narrowly escaped likely death when he reached the end of a gap bridge just as his safety harness broke off.

    The incident took place on Monday at the Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park, a thrill-seeker’s paradise 100 kilometers (62 miles) from Chongqing.

    In the video, the tourist is seen hopping on individual planks that make up the cliffside bridge 150 meters above the ground.



    To his surprise, the tourist found his safety rope detached just as he reached the last plank.



    The video quickly drew alarm on Chinese social media, with many calling to shut the theme park down.



    Following an investigation, officials from the Wansheng Economic Development Zone announced Thursday that the terrifying mishap was caused by an error on a staff member’s part.



    As a result, the attraction, known as “Extreme Leap,” was closed until further notice.


    Image via Sohu

    Interestingly, a theme park spokesperson claimed that the video was nothing but a marketing stunt by a private enterprise.


    Image via Net Ease

    Aside from “Extreme Leap,” the park is known for its high-altitude, adrenaline-pumping attractions, including a triangular glass-bottomed bridge that extends 80 meters from the base and a bunch of cliffside swings that dangle riders 300 meters above the ground.

    There are no safety nets reported in any of the attractions.


    Image via China News

    Netizens feared the dangerous attraction (via Asia One and South China Morning Post):

    “If someone had died in the video, what would they call it then?”

    “This marketing tactic only successfully demonstrates that the activity is far too dangerous.”

    “If it’s a marketing ploy, I hope it closes down soon.”

    “It’s not marketing – it’s true. The [authorities at this] scenic area just want to hide the facts. The video is so clear – the safety cord really broke off. You must not go, you’d be risking your life.”
    THREADS
    Chinese Bridges
    Chinese Theme Parks
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Hong Kong-Zhuhai bridge

    34 miles - WOW. That's a long time to be on a bridge.

    Hong Kong-Zhuhai bridge: World's longest sea crossing opens to quiet start
    7 hours ago


    REUTERS
    Officials said traffic was not expected to be busy on the first day

    The world's longest sea crossing bridge opened to the public on Wednesday but traffic was light on its first day.

    Officials said they did not expect many vehicles to immediately take to the road, adding that it could take "time to build".

    The $20bn (£15.3bn) bridge spans 55km (34 miles) and connects Hong Kong to Macau and the mainland Chinese city of Zhuhai.

    It was officially opened by Chinese President Xi Jinping on Tuesday.

    "Every big infrastructure [project] has a relatively low volume of passenger and traffic flow in the initial period. It takes time to build up," transport secretary Frank Chan told reporters.

    There were virtually no cars or lorries to be seen on the bridge but the route was plied by private shuttle buses, said the BBC's Martin Yip, who crossed from Hong Kong to Macau on Wednesday aboard one of these buses.

    There was a considerable crowd queuing up for shuttle buses at the Hong Kong terminal. "The atmosphere at the terminal was buzzing - it was quite busy and people were queuing up, though many of them were pensioners. There weren't many young people," he said.


    REUTERS
    Shuttle buses have been bringing eager commuters across the border

    Some eager passengers documented the entire journey on their phones, with one woman telling news agency AFP that she wanted to "check out the view".


    GETTY IMAGES
    Private drivers who want to cross the bridge have to obtain special permits, which are allocated via a stringent quota system. All vehicles also have to pay a toll.

    Only 10,000 permits are available for Hong Kong residents who want to drive to Zhuhai, which is located in the province of Guangdong. The permits are valid for five years.

    Only people or organisations that have made "certain financial or political contributions on the mainland" will be awarded permits, the South China Morning Post newspaper reports.

    To make matters more complicated, drivers will also have to change which side of the road they are on at the crossing.

    People drive on the left in Hong Kong and Macau but the bridge is Chinese territory and special merger channels have been built to cope with this.

    Authorities initially estimated that 9,200 vehicles would cross the bridge every day. They later lowered their estimations after new transport networks were built in the region.

    Special cameras will be on the look-out for drivers on the bridge who show signs of getting sleepy, among other checks - yawn three times and the authorities will be alerted, local media report.

    An engineering marvel
    Designed to withstand earthquakes and typhoons, the bridge was built using 400,000 tonnes of steel, enough to build 60 Eiffel Towers.

    About 30km of its total length crosses the sea of the Pearl River delta. To allow ships through, a 6.7km section in the middle dips into an undersea tunnel that runs between two artificial islands.

    The remaining sections are link roads, viaducts and land tunnels connecting Zhuhai and Hong Kong to the main bridge.

    In the past, travelling between Zhuhai and Hong Kong would take up to four hours - the new bridge cuts this down to 30 minutes.



    'Bridge of death'

    But the bridge has also earned its fair share of criticism.

    It has been dubbed the "bridge of death" by some local media outlets. At least nine workers on the Hong Kong side have died and officials told BBC News Chinese that nine had died on the mainland side, too.

    There have also been concerns about the environmental impact, with conservations groups saying the project may have caused serious harm to marine life in the area - including the critically rare Chinese white dolphin.

    "The project has made irreversible damage to the sea," said Samantha Lee, Assistant Director of Ocean Conservation at the WWF. "I am worried that the number will never rise again."


    AFP
    It is rare to see Chinese White Dolphins around the bridge after years of construction, say environmental groups

    The bridge, surrounding link roads and artificial islands cost a staggering $20bn to build - the main bridge alone cost $6.92bn.

    But according to an estimate by BBC Chinese, the bridge will only earn around $86m in tolls per year.

    Chinese officials say it will generate up to 10 trillion yuan ($1.44tn; £1tn) for the economy, but doubts have been cast on that figure by Hong Kong lawmakers.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Slightly OT

    This is slightly OT for both our UNESCO and the politics of culture and our Chinese Bridges threads. But it fits there better than elsewhere.

    China-funded bridge risks Unesco World Heritage status of San Agustin church, 3 others
    Binondo-Intramuros construction to encroach on buffer zone of country’s oldest church, a violation of 1993 Unesco declaration
    By: Edgar Allan M. Sembrano Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:07 AM November 19, 2018


    San Agustin Church

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) has warned that San Agustin Church and three other Baroque churches around the Philippines may be delisted from the prestigious World Heritage List as a result of the construction of the controversial Binondo-Intramuros Bridge across the Pasig River in Manila.

    The bridge would encroach on the “buffer zone” required by the Unesco for San Augustin Church as a World Heritage Site, according to Unesco National Commission (Unacom).

    Aside from San Agustin Church in Intramuros, the three other churches that may be removed from the Unesco list are San Agustin in Paoay, Ilocos Norte; Nuestra Señora de la Asuncion in Santa Maria, Ilcoos Sur; and Santo Tomas de Villanueva in Miag-ao, Iloilo.

    All of them were originally built by Augustinian friars and are called “Baroque Churches of the Philippines” and collectively declared as a “Unesco World Heritage Site” in 1993. If San Agustin Church is delisted, the three others will follow.

    Unesco has expressed its concerns in a letter, which has been forwarded by the Unacom to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), Len Barrientos, deputy executive director of Unacom, said .

    Funded by the Chinese government, the construction is announced in giant billboards along the Pasig by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) even without consultation with stakeholders, especially the cultural sector, considering it would affect Intramuros and old walled city’s cultural treasures and historic landmarks.

    Ironically no cultural agency and neither NCCA nor Intramuros Administration (IA), both agencies holding office in Intramuros, has formally notified DPWH that the bridge would affect the historical, cultural and engineering integrity of Intramuros and San Agustin Church, the oldest church in the Philippines.

    In fact, only after the Order of St. Augustine (OSA) formally raised the concern in a letter did cultural agencies start taking notice.

    Earlier, Fr. Peter Casino, OSA vicar for the Orient, sent a letter dated Oct. 30 to the ecclesiastical heads and city, municipal and provincial heads of the affected Unesco heritage churches, urging collective action on the matter.

    NCCA, IA and other cultural agencies will join the OSA friars and local government unit (LGU) and ecclesiastical representatives in a meeting with the DPWH on Nov. 21.

    ‘Outstanding’

    In its 1993 declaration, Unesco noted that the Spanish colonial religious edifices “are outstanding examples of the Philippine interpretation of the Baroque style, and represent the fusion of European church design and construction with local materials and decorative motifs to form a new church-building tradition.”

    It is for that reason that if one is affected by “unwanted development” and faces possible delisting, all other churches will be dropped as well, said former Unacom commissioner Eric Zerrudo.


    Miag-ao Church –PHOTOS BY EDGAR ALLANM. SEMBRANO

    The controversial project will stretch from Binondo to Plaza Mexico in Intramuros near the Bureau of Immigration building.

    Zerrudo said the bridge would affect the buffer zone of San Agustin Church, which includes the walls of Intramuros and immediate areas outside.

    Conservation strategy

    According to Unesco, the protection not only of the core zone but of the buffer zone is important since the surroundings of a World Heritage (WH) property are “essential component[s] of the conservation strategy.”

    Zerrudo explained that the buffer zone should be protected since any negative effects of a major construction project would threaten the outstanding universal value (OUV) of a WH property. This will affect its status in general, he added.

    “The bridge is more than just an encroachment,” he said. “It impacts negatively on the site’s OUV which includes the core and buffer zones.”

    He pointed to Operation Guidelines 172 to 174 of the World Heritage Center (WHC), which states that any negative impact on a WH site should be reported immediately, so that the WHC could assess the situation and recommend remedies.

    “The key there is that you go through a very long process of consultation, conferences, collaboration, compromises [with the WHC] and eventually you come up with the right solution still to uphold and maintain its OUV,” he said.

    Zerrudo said there have been cases in which a compromise was agreed by the state party and WHC. Turkey reduced the size of a planned bridge whose original size would affect the “Historic Areas of Istanbul.” The modification, Zerrudo said, was made so that the OUV of the inscribed property would not be affected.—CONTRIBUTED
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    3D printed bridge

    Shanghai opens world's longest 3D-printed concrete bridge
    Published 23rd January 2019


    -A team led by Xu Weiguo at Tsinghua University's School of Architecture completed the world's longest 3D-printed concrete bridge in Shanghai.Courtesy JCDA

    Written by Emily Dixon, CNN

    It's 86 feet long and was created entirely with a 3D printer. Shanghai is now home to the world's longest 3D-printed concrete bridge, produced by a team from the Tsinghua University School of Architecture in Beijing.
    The pedestrian crossing was modeled on the famed Zhaozhou Bridge, which was built between 589 and 618 in Hebei province, northern China, and is the country's oldest standing bridge. That crossing was made from limestone slabs, while the new structure, found in Shanghai's Baoshan district, was created using far more modern construction techniques.


    Shanghai is now home to the world's longest 3D printed concrete bridge. Credit: Courtesy JCDA

    The record-breaking bridge may not be as beautiful as its ancient predecessor, but what it lacks in aesthetics it makes up for in technology -- it was produced in just 450 hours and cost just a fraction of the usual price.
    Designed by professor Xu Weiguo, the bridge's body consists of 44 3D-printed concrete units, each measuring about 3x3x5 feet, while the flowing sides are made from 68 separate concrete slabs.
    The bridge was printed piece by piece, using two robotic arms and technology developed by Xu. Tsinghua University claims the project cost a third less than a standard bridge of equivalent size.
    Before construction started, a smaller model was created to test the design's integrity and prove its ability to support pedestrians. The bridge also contains systems that monitor internal stress and strain, helping its designers to track the structure's condition in real time.
    How artificial intelligence and robots can change your living spaces
    The world's first 3D-printed concrete bridge opened in the Netherlands in October 2017, measuring a comparatively small 26 feet. Created by Eindhoven University of Technology in the town of Gemert, the structure was designed to carry cyclists and comprises about 800 layers of concrete.
    THREADS:
    Chinese Bridges
    Syn, printed prosthetic
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    This confirms so much about this thread

    China closes dozens of “unsafe” scenic glass walkways
    Turns out, many of China's glass-bottomed bridges were built in a hurry without sufficient attention paid to safety
    by Alex Linder October 30, 2019 in News



    The last few years have been China’s golden age when it comes to glass-bottomed scenic walkways, however, that ambitious age may now be coming to an end.

    Chinese media reports that “many” tourist spots across the country are now closing their glass walkways which were built “without sufficient care for safety and management.” There is no nationwide safety standards or supervision for these type of structures, so it’s left up to provincial authorities to ensure that people don’t die.

    A total of 32 glass bridges and walkways have been closed in Hebei province over the past 18 months while six such sites in Guangdong have also received warnings.

    It remains to be seen, however, if inspectors will be able to keep up with the rate of construction. Prior to the Golden Week holiday, we saw a flurry of glass-bottomed attractions opened up. It’s estimated that China is home to some 2,300 glass bridges.
    The glass bridge fad really exploded back around 2015 in China and hasn’t slowed down much since, even after a newly-opened bridge on Henan’s Yuntai Mountain cracked.



    Scenic spots have even stayed busy coming up with new and more daring transparent attractions. Back in June, one person was killed and six others injured after falling off a glass slide at a Guangxi tourist site.
    Just can't trust fads like this, can ya?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Poor boar

    Wild boar becomes frozen in fear after stumbling onto one of China’s infamous glass walkways
    It's not only us humans who are terrified of these things
    by Alex Linder November 5, 2019 in News



    A young wild boar was recently spotted regretting its life decisions after finding itself standing on one of China’s glass walkways.

    In video from a scenic spot outside of the Zhejiang city of Hangzhou, the poor animal is seen lying, frozen in fear, on the transparent walkway, scrunched up as close as possible to the cliff wall, presumably trying to stop itself from looking at the ground, some 230 meters below.

    Eventually, officers from the local forestry bureau arrived to rescue the boar and take it away from this terrifying invention of man.

    While designed to attract and scare humans, China’s glass bridges have also freaked out animals including another wild boar outside of the Guangdong city of Qingyuan last year.

    Presumably this most recent boar had been reading the news and knew that China has recently closed dozens of its transparent walkways for being “unsafe.”
    Now I'm imagining being on this bridge with a wild boar...

    THREADS
    Chinese Bridges
    Year of the Pig 2019
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Pingtang Bridge

    Stunning new mega bridge cuts through the clouds in Guizhou province
    The bridge boasts towers as tall as skyscrapers
    by Alex Linder December 31, 2019



    A new and impressive mega-bridge has opened up in China’s mountainous Guizhou province, helping to cut travel time between two localities.

    It used to take over two and a half hours to drive from Pingtang county to Luodian county, now it takes only about an hour thanks to the 2,135-meter Pingtang Bridge which spans the Caodu River Canyon.

    Built at a cost of 1.5 billion yuan ($215 million), the bridge boasts the world’s highest concrete bridge tower with a height of 332 meters — that’s the equivalent of a 110-story skyscraper.

    [Images via ChinaNews]
    This barely looks real...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,085

    Piyan Mountain Bridge

    Inevitable...

    Strong winds leave tourist stranded on damaged glass bridge in China
    Shawn Deng and Karla Cripps, CNN • Published 10th May 2021

    (CNN) — Extreme weather is being blamed for a terrifying incident that left one tourist stranded on a 260-meter-high glass-bottomed suspension bridge in northeast China's Jilin province on May 7.
    In an image shared by Chinese state media Xinhua on Chinese social media site Weibo, a person can be seen clinging to the rail of the bridge, surrounded by missing and damaged glass platform panels.
    The bridge is located in the Piyan Mountain Cultural Tourism Scenic Area outside the city of Longjing. According to a statement posted on the Weibo account of local authorities, the incident took place at 12:45 p.m. on Friday, when was hit by record-high winds of up to 150 kilometers per hour.

    Officials say rescue teams were called in to assist the stranded tourist, who was able to evacuate the bridge at 1:20 p.m.

    A file photo of the glass-bottomed bridge in northeast China's Jilin province taken in 2018.
    Wang mingming/ICHPL Imaginechina/AP
    "The staff of the scenic area rushed to the scene as soon as possible, brought emergency equipment and successfully transferred the trapped person to a safe area," said the statement.
    "There were no casualties. After being kept in the hospital for observation, the trapped person was in stable emotional and physical condition and has been discharged from the hospital."
    The entire Piyan Mountain Scenic Area has since been closed and officials have ordered a comprehensive safety inspection of all attractions in the area, including the bridge.
    Netizens question safety of glass bridges
    China is famed for its record-breaking glass bridges, which are popular tourist attractions. These include a new 526-meter-long structure in Qingyuan, Guangdong, which holds the Guinness World Record for longest glass-bottom bridge.
    But the incident in Jilin province has some netizens in China expressing alarm.
    "Things I worried about have happened -- [I will] never risk trying dangerous things in the future," said one user on the Weibo social media site.
    According to a report by Xinhua, some local governments have already put additional safety guidelines in place.
    For instance, north China's Hebei Province -- home to a 488-meter-long bridge in the Hongyagu Scenic Area -- released new technical standards in 2018 for glass bridges and scenic area walkways, providing specific guidelines for materials, location, design and construction.
    "For example, glass bridges should not be built in areas with high seismic activity and must be closed during bad weather and natural disasters, and the number of pedestrians on such bridges and walkways will be limited to no more than three per square meter," says the report.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    This kind of bridge will make my friend sleep in an instant

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •