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Thread: Bubble Tea

  1. #1
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    Slighty OT

    Boba tea ain't real tea. And apparently, it ain't real boba either sometimes.

    Hospital finds milk tea boba balls in Chinese reporter's stomach actually made of something disgusting
    by Danny Kichi on Fri, Oct 23, 2015



    What people love most about milk tea boba, otherwise known as bubble tea, are the chewy and sweet tapioca balls sitting at the bottom of the drink. These delicious balls are usually made out of tapioca starch and brown sugar, but as one Chinese reporter recently found out, sometimes they're made out of something else.

    A local reporter for Shangdong Television in Qingdao, China got a little thirsty while on the job just a while ago, so he ordered a milk tea boba from a local shop. A few hours after drinking the tea and munching on all the tapioca balls, he fell quite ill, so he went to the hospital for a check-up. After a number of tests, and with no answer as to what was causing his patient's distress, the doctor performed a CT scan and saw some undigested tapioca balls sitting at the bottom of the reporter's stomach. So the doctor extracted the balls and sent them to Qingdao University’s Chemical Experimentation Center, where scientists analyzed them to figure out what exactly these things were made of.

    When the scientists reported back to the doctor that the tapioca balls were "highly adhesive," the doctor immediately relayed this information to his patient. And because he was a reporter, the man who had ingested these mysterious materials decided to do some investigating. What he found out while going undercover at the tea shop was something he had trouble digesting — literally. The tapioca balls that he so happily chewed on and swallowed a few weeks earlier were actually produced in a chemical plant and made out of the soles of leather shoes and tires. And yes, the shoes and tires were not new when they were recycled. Gross!

    So if you ever go to Qingdao, you might want to make sure that the tapioca balls sitting at the bottom of your tea are actually made of something edible.

    Delicious!


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  2. #2
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    I drink tea. Not bubble tea, nor anything other than hot water and the tea leaves.

    Drink that **** at your own risk.

    Which is now a real risk.
    Dr. Dale Dugas
    Hakka Mantis
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    All for Use
    Nothing for Show

  3. #3
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    srsly?

    Starbucks wants to start selling its own tea in China by September



    Already scheduled to open up its first coffee shop in Italy, Starbucks has bold ambitions for this year that also include bringing its own branded tea line to China, as well as the UK, France and Germany.
    Bloomberg Business reports that the American coffee giant will begin introducing its Teavana products to China by September. While, globally, tea sales amount to more than $100 billion and Starbucks' tea sales rose 17% to nearly $1 billion since last year, bringing Teavana to China is a risky move.



    China has an ancient relationship with the beverage with legends claiming the first brew happened in 2737 B.C. Recently, archaeologists dug up the oldest evidence of its use in the tomb of a Han emperor. In the present day, China is the world's greatest consumer of tea. You can even get tea-flavored toothpaste!
    Still, Starbucks already has some business acumen in China, having dealt with expired meat scandals and push-back against Western food companies.



    The 45-year-old company hopes to eventually have more outlets in China than in the US. Chief operating officer, Kevin Johnson, explains his faith in Teavana here:
    “It’s very complementary to our coffee business. With Teavana -- similar to what we’ve done with coffee -- we’ve established a very premium brand.”
    Starbucks will face plenty of local competition in the form of home-grown drinks like bubble milk tea as well as herbal offerings from outlets like KFC, China's most popular foreign brand.
    By Matthew Patel
    [Image via Flickr]
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Shanghaiist in News on Mar 24, 2016 8:20 PM
    What next? Panda Express in China?
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  4. #4
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    This probably doesn't quite fit on this forum

    ...but I just poached the posts above off the Tea thread here. And the ol' TCM forum is one of our slowest, so we'll just keep this here for giggles. Or should I say jiggles?

    Big breasted beauties want you to try out Taiwan's latest craze: light bulb bubble tea



    Thai netizens have taken note lately of a strange new phenomenon that is apparently taking root in Taiwan and even being exported around the globe: light bulb bubble tea!



    Innovative? Weird? Meh? Whatever the case, Light Bulbble Tea (trademark: Shanghaiist) has certainly managed to at least turn a few heads, according to NetEase.



    Just maybe, though, it isn't so much the re-purposed light bulbs that have garnered so much attention online, but the bevy of duck-faced voluptuous woman ready to serve this new beverage?



    The creators of this craze obviously know that the key to commercial success in Taiwan is to have really attractive people on staff. Just look what it has done for bean curd:



    And pork! Well, maybe pork didn't need quite as much help.



    Look out world for the next big thing.



    By Stanley Yu
    [Images via NetEase]
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Shanghaiist in News on May 9, 2016 6:55 PM
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  5. #5

    Very spot on!!

    Greetings,

    It seems that the idea is to connect the tea with breast milk. In some Spanish speaking countries, the slang term for a woman's breasts is "bombillas," meaning light bulbs. So, it makes me wonder if this idea is due to cross cultural influences or something unique.

    See my thread on Orangina:

    http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/...20#post1293720

    mickey
    Last edited by mickey; 05-15-2016 at 08:38 AM.

  6. #6
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    Q

    In Italy, ‘Al Dente’ Is Prized. In Taiwan, It’s All About Food That’s ‘Q.’


    Taiwanese tapioca for sale at the Lehua Night Market in Taipei. It has the prized “Q” texture of Taiwanese food.CreditCreditBilly H.C. Kwok for The New York Times
    By Amy Qin
    Oct. 4, 2018

    NEW TAIPEI CITY, Taiwan — As dusk falls at Lehua Night Market, the fluorescent lights flicker on and the hungry customers start trickling in, anxious for a taste of the local delicacies that give this island its reputation as one of Asia’s finest culinary capitals.

    Neatly arranged pyramids of plump fish balls. Bowls brimming with tapioca balls bathed in lightly sweetened syrup. Sizzling oyster omelets, hot off the griddle. Deep-fried sweet potato puffs, still dripping with oil.

    Take a bite of any of these dishes and you’ll discover a unique texture. But how exactly do you describe that perfectly calibrated “mouth feel” so sought after by local cooks and eaters alike?

    Slippery? Chewy? Globby? Not exactly the most flattering adjectives in the culinary world.

    Luckily, the Taiwanese have a word for this texture. Well, actually, it’s not a word, it’s a letter — one that even non-Chinese speakers can pronounce.

    It’s “Q.”

    “It’s difficult to explain what Q means exactly,” said Liu Yen-ling, a manager at Chun Shui Tang, a popular teahouse chain that claims to have invented tapioca milk tea in Taiwan. “Basically it means springy, soft, elastic.”

    Q texture is to Taiwanese what umami is to Japanese and al dente is to Italians — that is, cherished and essential. Around Taiwan, the letter Q can often be glimpsed amid a jumble of Chinese characters on shop signs and food packages and in convenience stores and advertisements.


    Q bars, Taiwanese tapioca and sesame doughnuts.Credit Billy H.C. Kwok for The New York Times

    The texture is found in both savory and sweet foods, and is most often used to describe foods that contain some kind of starch like noodles, tapioca pearls and fish balls. If something is really chewy or extra Q, then it could be called QQ. Often, Q and QQ are used interchangeably.

    “You can tell if bubble milk tea is good based on how Q the tapioca pearls are,” Mr. Liu said. “If the texture is perfect, it can be very satisfying.”

    André Chiang, a Michelin-star chef and owner of RAW in Taipei, said he had recently been experimenting with the texture at his restaurant, which uses only locally sourced Taiwanese ingredients.


    At the night market in Taipei. Q texture is to Taiwanese what umami is to Japanese and al dente is to Italians — that is, cherished and essential.Credit Billy H.C. Kwok for The New York Times

    One dish he was trying out for the restaurant’s new menu featured langoustine, burned onion juice and white tapioca pearls that are cooked to bubbly Q perfection.

    “It’s like al dente but not quite,” Mr. Chiang said. “It’s to the tooth but there’s also that added element of bounciness.”

    Q is so well established in Taiwan that many in Hong Kong and over the strait in mainland China use the term as well.

    Elsewhere in Asia, it is a familiar texture, though the term itself may not be used. Tteok-bokki, a Korean stir-fried rice cake, and mochi, a Japanese rice cake, for example, could also be considered Q. In Western cuisine, the texture is less commonly found, though one could describe foods like gummy bears and certain kinds of pasta as Q.

    The origins of the term Q are unclear. Some say it comes from the Taiwanese Hokkien word k’iu. Say Q to an elderly Taiwanese, and chances are he or she will know the term. But no one can quite explain how and when the 17th letter of the English alphabet became shorthand for describing the texture of tapioca balls and gummy candies.


    Milk curd, happy QQ balls (sweet potato balls) and konjac.Credit Billy H.C. Kwok for NYT; Ashley Pon for NYT; Billy H.C. Kwok for NYT

    With the rapid proliferation of bubble milk tea shops and other Asian snack shops across the United States over the years, there has emerged a broader appreciation for this once “exotic” texture, even if the vocabulary to describe that texture has not exactly caught up.

    “Most of my American friends like bubble milk tea,” said Tina Fong, a co-founder of Taipei Eats, which offers food tours around the city. “But when there’s Q texture in a savory dish, it can still be a bit strange to them. It really depends on the person.”

    When it comes to the Chinese language, the letter Q is surprisingly versatile, and not used only to describe food. For example, many in China and Taiwan are familiar with 阿Q, or Ah Q, the protagonist of one of China’s most famous novellas by the writer Lu Xun.

    After the publication of “The True Story of Ah Q” in the early 1920s, Ah Q became a symbol of the backwardness of Chinese culture. While the story’s narrator confesses to not knowing the origin of Ah Q’s name, some scholars say Lu Xun may have chosen Q as an implicit reference to its ****nym queue, or the braided ponytail that Chinese men were forced to wear to show their subjugation to the ruling Qing dynasty.


    Tapioca pearls and bubble milk tea at Chun Shui Tang teahouse in Taipei, left and middle. A bowl of beef noodle at Taipei’s Lin Dong Fang beef noodle shop.Credit Ashley Pon for The New York Times

    Some have also interpreted Lu Xun’s Q as a pictogram of a head with a pigtail.

    There are many other uses for the term Q in Chinese as well. It could be used, for example, as shorthand for the English word cute, or to refer to the once-popular QQ messaging service from Tencent or the QQ minicar model from the Chinese carmaker Chery.

    “Whether Q may be considered a Chinese character or not, it certainly has become a part of the Chinese writing system,” Victor Mair, a professor of Chinese language at the University of Pennsylvania, once wrote in a blog post.

    Among Taiwanese, the appreciation for Q texture starts at a young age. On a recent sticky evening at Lehua Night Market, crowds ambled through the carnival-like pedestrian street, which was lined on both sides with vendors hawking things like hats, cellphone cases and, of course, delicious snacks.

    A gaggle of mini revelers zeroed in on a stand with a neon sign that read “QQ popsicles.” Asked why Q texture was so appealing to Taiwanese, Lu Wei-chen, the owner of the stand, smiled as she handed a bright red jelly bar to a delighted toddler.

    “It’s simple,” she said. “When you eat it, you will be in a good mood.”


    Vermicelli and pig blood cake for sale at the night market.Credit Billy H.C. Kwok for The New York Times

    Follow Amy Qin on Twitter: @amyyqin
    Karoline Kan contributed research from Beijing.

    This explains a great mystery to me. I've seen Q before in ads and such and never put this together.

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  7. #7
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    Pei Pa Koa boba

    Ryan General·December 17, 2018·4 min read
    California Boba Tea Shop Rocks the World With Chinese Cough Medicine Bubble Tea



    A new bubble tea concoction from a shop in San Gabriel, California is set to tap into its Asian customers’ nostalgia while also providing relief for sore throats, coughs, hoarseness and aphonia.

    Blended with popular Chinese herbal syrup “Pei Pa Koa,” the new drink from Labobatory is bound to bring back childhood memories.


    Image via Facebook / Labobatory

    Known for its distinct minty taste, the cough syrup traces its origins from a formula created in the Qing Dynasty. The syrup has been manufactured since the 1940s and sold worldwide by Nin Jiom Medicine Manufactory.

    It has been the go-to remedy for a variety of cough-related ailments for generations of Asians in many parts of the world.


    Image via Facebook / Labobatory

    Labobatory aims for their cough syrup-infused beverage to remind drinkers of that time when their Asian mothers took care of them when they were sick.

    According to the bubble tea shop, the new drink will be available throughout the holiday season along with four other holiday-inspired flavors as part of their holiday menu.


    Image via Facebook / Labobatory

    The other beverages introduced for its holiday menu are Chocolate Peppermint Milk Tea, White Chocolate Strawberry Milk Tea and Spiced Chocolate.


    Image via Facebook / Labobatory

    “We strive to create unique concoctions that blend premium traditional ingredients and modern twist on ingredients new and old,” the company’s Facebook page noted.


    Image via Facebook / Labobatory

    In its bid to “raise the boba bar,” the inventive folks behind Labobatory has been making unique boba tea creations since 2011, introducing offerings such as Alcoholic Boba, Yakult-infused yogurt boba, among others.


    Featured Images via Facebook / Labobatory
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  8. #8
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    constipator...

    Chinese Girl suffers constipation for 5 days. The cause? Bubble tea pearls


    PHOTO: Pixabay & Weibo

    KIMBERLY FOO
    ASIAONE
    Jun 06, 2019

    Consider this fair warning for the bubble tea-obsessed.

    A 14-year-old girl in China landed herself in hospital, after not being able to move her bowels for five days.

    The girl, who lived in Zhejiang province, complained of being constipated, not being able to eat, and was suffering from stomachaches. According to Chinese media reports, her parents finally sent her to the hospital on May 28.

    Unable to find the cause of her digestive issues, a CT scan was performed, where doctors found many unusual spherical shadows in her abdomen.


    Photo: Screenshot from Weibo

    Doctors deduced that the shadows were actually around a hundred undigested tapioca pearls from bubble tea she had consumed.

    Initially reluctant to reveal what she ate, the girl finally spilled the beans, but insisted that she only drank a cup of bubble tea five days before this incident.

    However, Doctor Zhang Louzhen, who treated her, suspected that she may have been hiding the truth for fear of punishment from her parents. He said it would take ingesting a significant amount of pearls for an extended period of time for her condition to be this severe.

    The girl was prescribed some laxatives to relieve her of constipation.

    Another doctor interviewed also issued a warning that bubble tea pearls or boba, which are made out of starch, are actually hard for the body to digest.

    In addition, some stores may add thickeners and preservatives to the pearls, and continuous consumption of such ingredients can lead to gastro-intestinal dysfunction.

    As they say, all things in moderation.

    kimberlyfoo@asiaone.com
    Wonder how much boba she really drank...
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  9. #9
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    Who is Karry Wang? Anyone here know?

    I was tempted to move this Bubble Tea thread to our OT subforum because it isn't TCM, but then I figured the TCM forum could use the traffic.

    Chinese boy band star’s parents’ bubble tea shop shut after three days – it went viral, and staff, equipment couldn’t cope
    Parents of singer Karry Wang, of Chinese band TFBoys, opened a tea shop in Chongqing, western China, trading on his fame. They didn’t expect what happened next
    Wang fans queued for four hours on first day, and business exploded to the point staff were overwhelmed and machines broke down. The shop has since reopened
    Vivienne Chow
    Published: 6:00pm, 22 Jul, 2019


    Karry Wang of TFBoys. His parents opened a bubble tea shop, Chaforu, in the western Chinese city of Chongqing, but when fans queued four hours on the first day, the news went viral and business exploded. Staff were overwhelmed, equipment broke down and it shut after three days, before reopening.

    China’s multibillion-yuan fan economy promises massive returns for entrepreneurs able to monetise the interactions between stars and their fans – but one couple in the western metropolis of Chongqing appear to have underestimated the thirst of pop music fans for a brush with their idol.
    The parents of Karry Wang, a member of mega Chinese pop band TFBoys, capitalised on the fame of their 19-year-old son by opening a bubble tea store named Chaforu in their home city this month, but were forced to close after just three days.
    The reason? Business was just too good.
    Reports said more than 1,000 fans, mostly young girls, had queued up outside on the first day of business and some had to wait up to four hours to get a drink. News of the store opening spread rapidly on social media and photos of the queue and the outlet’s drinks posted by fans waiting patiently to be served went viral.


    The Chaforu bubble tea store in Chongqing was so successful the machinery broke down.

    Business exploded in the following days and some of Wang’s fans even started queuing at 5am. One fan was quoted by as saying: “I arrived at the shop front at 7.30am. After a long wait, I finally got my milk tea at 11.30am. I even had a chance to have a chat with everyone’s ‘mother-in-law’ [Wang’s mother].”
    But Wang’s parents were not prepared for their overnight success. Three days after the shop’s opening, Chaforu announced on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, that it would be closing temporarily, without providing a reason. In its post, the shop only thanked the fans for their support.
    However, a Weibo user revealed that the shop had to close because its staff had been overwhelmed and its equipment broke down after just three days due to Wang’s overwhelming popularity.

    firstloveneverdie
    @halurita
    Bubble tea shop open by Karry's family. 👪
    CHA FOR U 星卡里 - in Chongqing.
    When you go to Chongqing, don't forget to stop by and support yo ~ 🥤🍵😋
    PS : Karry's mommy and daddy are so cute and loving. 🥰💙 #王俊凯 #karrywang #wangjunkai

    View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
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    11:12 AM - Jun 30, 2019 · Central Region, Singapore
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    The store recently reopened and business is still booming – so much so that Wang himself doesn’t dare pay a visit. Late last week he was seen loitering outside the shop wearing a black mask, but sent an assistant in to get his favourite drink to avoid causing chaos inside.
    Chaforu’s success is just the latest example of the hype surrounding China’s fan economy that emerged alongside the rise of Chinese idols such as TFBoys.
    Wang made his debut as a member of TFBoys in 2013, at the age of 13 with fellow members Roy Wang and Jackson Yee. The trio quickly became superstars and by 2016 Karry Wang was said to be one of the country’s wealthiest young performers, although fellow member Yee eclipsed him as the most valuable star in China by amassing more than 70 million followers on Chinese social media network Weibo, more than the population of the UK.


    Karry Wang’s parents had to close their bubble tea store when the overworked machinery broke down.

    Together the TFBoys – the most famous of the young stars referred to as “little fresh meat” in China – are said to be worth US$4 billion.
    Outside of his work with TFBoys, Wang has started releasing solo singles, but his career has slowed somewhat since he enrolled in the Beijing Film Academy in 2017. Last year he starred in the hit television drama series Eagles and Youngsters, and has joined the cast for the yet-to-be-released fantasy animated feature L. O. R. D: Legend of Ravaging Dynasties 2.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Boy band idol’s fame causes storm in a tea shop
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  10. #10
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    wth?

    a theme park? srsly?

    Bubble tea amusement park to open in Harajuku, promises to be the “tapioca land of your dreams”
    Dale Roll 5 days ago



    Boba fans won’t want to miss this!

    Tapioca tea, also known as boba or bubble tea depending on who you’re talking to, has been a popular drink in other parts of Asia and in Asian communities outside the continent, but in Japan the craze hadn’t really caught on until recently. Now there’s tapioca ramen, tapioca beer, official Pokémon tapioca drinks, and somebody even came up with the idea of putting tapioca balls in a rice cooker (and it actually tastes good!), so it’s safe to say that Japan now loves tapioca, too.

    Hardcore tapioca tea fans will definitely want to visit Tokyo this summer, because there’s going to be a special tapioca drink “theme park” opening up for a limited time in Harajuku! Tokyo Tapioca Land will be open from August 13 to September 16 in front of Harajuku Station, and it promises to be everything a boba fan could want, and more.



    What do we mean by a tapioca theme park? Why tapioca drink stands, tapioca food, a tapioca photo booth, and even tapioca rides, of course! With the theme being “Tapioca Dream Land”, you can expect tapioca to be used in everything, from the food and drink to the decor and attractions. At this theme park they want you to experience tapioca “with your whole body”, so be ready to be blown away with new boba experiences. Several famous tapioca shops are also planning to make an appearance, so this might also be the best place to find out what your favorite kind of tapioca tea is.



    Tokyo Tapioca Land will be in a newly built shopping area called “jing”, which is about a two-minute walk from JR Harajuku station, and directly accessible from Tokyo Metro’s Meiji Jingu-mae Station, so it will be in a very convenient location. But that also means it will likely be busy, and since the dates place it square in the middle of summer vacation, we highly recommend that you buy your tickets ahead of time. There will only be 1,000 pre-sale tickets, and at 1,000 yen (US$9.20) each, they’re 200 yen less than tickets at the door, so they’ll probably sell out quickly. You can buy them onlie through Yahoo! Passmarket.

    So boba tea fans, don’t miss out! You’ll definitely want to make a visit to this temporary tapioca dreamland before it’s gone!

    Theme park information
    Tokyo Tapioca Land / 東京タピオカランド
    Address: Tokyo-to Shibuya-ku Jingu-Mae 6-35-6 jing
    東京都渋谷区神宮前6丁目35-6
    Open: August 13 to September 16
    August hours: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (last order 6:45)
    September hours: 1 p.m.-7 p.m. (weekdays), 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (weekends) (last order 6:45)
    Entrance Fee: 1,000 yen for pre-sale tickets, 1,200 yen at the door; Children elementary age and younger free

    Source: PR Times, Tokyo Tapioca Land
    Images: PR Times
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  11. #11
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    I can't even think of a use for a boba emoji but I do like saying boba emoji

    And I thought my job was odd.

    Meet the SF designer of the Twitter Fail Whale and 5 food emojis
    Tamara Palmer Updated 9:51 am PDT, Monday, October 7, 2019


    Yiying Lu, San Francisco based artist, who designed the Boba, the Dumpling Photo: Photo Illustration: Blair Heagerty / SFGate
    Photo: Photo Illustration: Blair Heagerty / SFGate

    Yiying Lu, San Francisco based artist, who designed the Boba, the Dumpling

    When Yiying Lu speaks, her accent is the remixed result of being born in Shanghai, educated in Sydney and London and living in San Francisco for the past decade. That global perspective has influenced her work as an emoji designer and resulted in the official illustrations for dumplings, chopsticks, fortune cookies and Chinese takeout boxes (plus Twitter's classic 'fail whale'). Her creations have become a universal language throughout the world.

    Lu, who is one of the founders of the emoji-democratizing org known as Emojination, now has an essential new emoji to share with the world: the boba drink, due to hit mobile phones in 2020.

    The boba emoji first took shape around four years ago as a birthday gift to an executive at the venture fund and seed accelerator 500 Startups, where Lu worked as the creative director. She knew there was a need for a boba emoji, but she didn't relish the idea of once again going through Unicode Consortium's surprisingly tedious proposal process that's required to make emojis official across platforms.

    "I was halfway through the proposal but then I got really caught up because all of these take a lot of time to write, and writing is not my forte," Lu said, sipping a boba drink at a new San Francisco shop called SimplexiTea. "Making art is easy but writing and doing research, it's almost like a PhD paper."

    At first Lu worked alone on the proposal, but was soon joined by a team of computer science students and professors from Chicago. She left the writing of the largely up to her newfound team, save for one key section that points out the origins of the word boba as a Taiwanese slang word for big breasts.

    "I did my research, it's very important!" she joked. "I'm more about language evolution and stuff so, yeah, I was very proud of that. We need to evangelize it. That was my contribution, apart from the art: the womanhood! Bring it into context: think about it, the milk is always coming from the mom! Even almond milk is coming from Mother Earth; you've got to honor that. You've got to honor the female power."

    Lu stops short of endorsing any one boba purveyor in San Francisco. She's a fan of many shops, but her ideal cup is admittedly hard to find.

    "I like tea that's in your face," she said. "I feel like if it's a really good boba, the tea will give you that punchiness. That's what I usually get when I go to Asia. I feel like boba should have really good ingredients. A really good boba is not too sweet; that's very important. It's always got the perfect amount of sweetness, but the tea needs to be really strong. You can actually taste the flavor of tea, and I feel like that is something I'm looking for always."

    Lu has also recently created the "San Francisco Seal of Approval," a take on the iconic "I [Heart] New York" logo that features one of her characteristically uplifting and whimsical animal creations. She's designed related seals for San Francisco's 19 sister cities, which include Lu's beloved Shanghai and Sydney. She considers it her life's calling to bridge international cultural barriers with her visual art and her extensive speaking work.

    "I'm not only the bridge between art and tech, I'm also the bridge between work and life, beauty and meaning and the East and West," she said during a TEDx talk in Palo Alto in June.

    "People are like, 'Are you a designer? Are you a creative speaker? Who are you?'" she says. "'Well, I'm an alien with extraordinary ability, that was on my Visa.' But I think I got very lucky to be able to have the capacity to do the things I love to do and also help to shape the culture."

    "In a way it's like being an architect," she reckoned. "You're actually using creativity and innovation to help to move the ecosystem."

    Tamara Palmer is a freelance writer in the Bay Area.
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  12. #12
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,061

    Kung Fu Tea opening

    It's good to see anything open during the pandemic.
    THE FAMOUS KUNG FU TEA IS OPENING SOON AT LUBBOCK’S SOUTH PLAINS MALL
    JAN MILLER Published: August 19, 2020



    The famous Kung Fu Tea is getting set to open soon at Lubbock's South Plains Mall, 6002 Slide Road.

    Called the 'Starbucks of bubble tea' according to an online review, Kung Fu Tea is set to bring the big-time bubble tea experience to Lubbock. So if your bubble tea could use some wow-factor, get ready for Kung Fu Tea. They're anticipating opening possibly as soon as this month, although we haven't seen confirmation yet.

    One thing's for sure: our thirst-buds have never been quenched quite this way before. Kung Fu Tea has a serious track record.

    They boast a lifestyle with significance and energy. They are "fresh," "innovative" and "fearless," with locations around the world, including 250 in the United States. Since they launched in 2010 in New York, they've built a powerhouse reputation.

    Here's what they say on their website:

    Kung Fu, in its purest essence, is the desire for self-improvement and to expand one's capabilities beyond all limitations.

    Here at Kung Fu Tea, we believe that it’s our mission to not only continuously improve our brand and beverages and the lives of our customers through providing only the most delicious, high-quality flavors but also to inspire the community to dream big and live fearlessly.

    Founded in Queens, NY on April 30, 2010, we’re America’s largest bubble tea brand with over 250+ locations across the U.S. As one of the OGs of bubble tea, we maintain uncompromisingly high standards. Let’s be real. Making tea that looks good isn’t the hard part. The actual challenge is making tea that tastes good and presenting it in an innovative way. Made with the art of ‘3T’ Kung Fu, every cup of tea is freshly brewed at the perfect temperature using premium tea leaves.

    Wow -- talk about tea on a mission. We look forward to visiting Kung Fu Tea when they open and will keep you posted. You can visit their website for their menu and more of their impressive story.
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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