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Thread: Atomic Blonde

  1. #1
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    Atomic Blonde



    Nice single shot fight sequence in the beginning from Charlize. Looks promising.

    If Charlize does a sword fight in this, I will lose it.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2

    Atomic Blonde Trailer


  3. #3
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    Atomic Blonde - Official Trailer #2 [HD]



    Looks like Charlize could teach Iron Fist a move or two.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #4
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    Atomic Blonde - Fight Like a Girl [HD]

    Gene Ching
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  5. #5
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    “Doing a love scene with guys is different, but I enjoy both,” Theron smiled.

    July 18, 2017

    Charlize Theron Dishes on Sex Scenes with Men and Women



    Getty

    Charlize Theron is dangerously beautiful as lethal assassin Lorraine in her new action thriller “Atomic Blonde.” “Extra’s” Terri Seymour sat down with the actress in Berlin, where she opened up on that racy love scene with Sofia Boutella that everyone is talking about!

    Theron shared the hottest love scene ever with Boutella, who plays a French spy, something she said was easy. She explained, “With Sofia, it was easy just because were both dancers and you have to choreograph those scenes quite a bit. Otherwise, they just become silly. There is a technical aspect to it, so with her it was really easy because she thinks like me because we’re dancers. We shot that scene in, like, 45 minutes and with the guys, they’re not dancers, so, it takes a bit more work. I enjoy both — yes!”

    “Doing a love scene with guys is different, but I enjoy both,” Theron smiled.

    The 41-year-old got into the best shape of her life for the movie, which required her to do some fight scenes. Theron commented, “We always wanted to raise the bar a little, but with the action, we wanted it to still feel that a woman could do all of that stuff — that was important for me as a woman, I wanted it to feel authentic, so no one can say a woman can’t do that.” She went on to point out, “I’m going to be 42 in August, very proud to say, ladies.”

    Her training for the film did take a toll on her body. The Oscar winner chipped two teeth during her combat training, saying, “I went through the first two surgeries before we started the film, and then I wrapped the movie and had another two surgeries and I still have one more.”

    The single mom to 6-year-old Jackson and nearly 2-year-old August don’t realize how cool she is. She said, “They don’t think I’m cool at all! I was singing in the car the other day and Jackson was like, ‘Mom, can you not sing, please? Stop doing that.'”

    “Atomic Blonde” is in theaters July 28.
    I got invited to a screener but unfortunately I can't make it. So bummed.
    Gene Ching
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  6. #6
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    fourth root canal

    Daaaanng. Charlize - RESPECT.

    MARCH 29, 2017 11:01am PT by Aaron Couch
    'Atomic Blonde': Charlize Theron Having "Fourth Root Canal" After Cracking Teeth On Set

    Theron shared the gritty details at CinemaCon.

    Charlize Theron brought Atomic Blonde to CinemaCon — even as she's still getting over the damage from the film's stunts.

    Theron stars as an undercover MI6 agent, who's operating during the Cold War. The film is from John Wick filmmaker David Leitch, who is set to helm the upcoming Deadpool 2. It also stars The Mummy's Sofia Boutella, James McAvoy, John Goodman and Toby Jones.

    Theron's journey started when her production company was sent an unpublished graphic novel five years ago and it grabbed her attention.
    "She's a *****," Theron deadpanned when asked to describe her character.

    Leitch spoke about the fight-fest that includes long uncut scenes, saying it's not for everyone — it requires an actor who doesn't mind getting beat up and even cracking her teeth.

    "I'm going in for my fourth root canal tomorrow. Thanks David," said Theron.

    They showed a new look at the film, which included Theron's character beating someone up with her shoe and plenty from McAvoy providing some comic relief (and looking cool doing it).

    The film is set as Theron's character is called in to Berlin five days before the Berlin Wall falls, and she joins a colorful world where spies have gone rogue.

    Atomic Blonde is set for a July 28 release.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #7
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    She looks great and pretty convincing.
    Mad props to the stunt team.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  8. #8
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    She does look great. In fact, she looks better and far more convincing in those onscreen fighting clips than a lot of 'real' MAists and pro fighters who cross over into making movies. And yes, a great choreographer and stunt team are essential.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 07-25-2017 at 08:42 AM.

  9. #9
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    Not to mention she is so freaking HOT !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Not to mention she is so freaking HOT !
    Yes, there is that!

    It opened in fourth place at the box office. I haven't seen the movie (yet), but I'm a little surprised it didn't have a stronger opening. One of THE big current trends is female empowerment, often featuring women kicking a$$ in sports, TV/film, pro wrestling, etc., etc. I guess you just never know what will click with audiences.

    *edit:
    The R rating is probably a big reason. Charleze Theron's character won't be seen as a potential role model for young girls (like Wonder Woman, for example).
    Last edited by Jimbo; 08-01-2017 at 07:43 AM.

  11. #11
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    First forum review!

    Saw this last week and I wanted to get this posted before Birth of the Dragon (see my Wolf Warrior 2 review just posted minutes ago too).

    I really enjoy David Leitch films. He knows how to deliver action and super tasty ultravi. And Charlize is a goddess. A GODDESS. Move aside Gal, let an Oscar winner show you how it's done. Charlize can truly act, she can do stunts and fight, selling punches and kicks with pounding impact, and isn't afraid to get dirty, naked and beaten. And she's super hot. Now in her 40s, she's hotter than ever. Add James Macalvoy and John Goodman and I'm so in. It's set by the Berlin Wall just before it falls, so the soundtrack is packed with nostalgic electro euro pop and the sets are decaying buildings lit with glowing neon diffused with cigarette smoke. Charlize owns Lorraine, a Stoli swigging ice queen spy in sharp stiletto heels, cold and calculating, and very very lethal. Extra points for the Stoli - that was my drink of choice too around those years. Like John Wick, Leitch creates an assassins' underworld with an implausible body count, but it's all about the ultravi. The fights are high octane, visceral, and sanguinous. Charlize delivers and you can see it's her for most of it (she cracked several teeth in the shoot for real - read above). The centerpiece fight is a brutal long single shot - there are surely some digital stitches in the crazy swirling camera work, but it is impressive choreography to behold from every angle. I'd slo mo that just to breakdown the technical mastery. I already want to see that scene again.

    I really want this to become a franchise like John Wick and I really want there to be a swordfight in the sequel. Please please please Mr. Leitch. I'm begging for it.

    It's all about Charlize now. GODDESS of mayhem.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    I agree with Gene, it was a great movie and highly recommend it.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #13
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    Oni

    Life is good when your comic book gets picked up for a movie, especially when it stars Charlize.

    OCTOBER 04, 2017 8:00am PT by Graeme McMillan
    Oni Entertainment Exec on 'Atomic Blonde' Success and What's Next
    The Oregon-based comic book publisher is enjoying new levels of visibility thanks to the Charlize Theron Cold War adaptation.


    Courtesy of Oni Press
    Charlie Chu

    The Oregon-based comic book publisher is enjoying new levels of visibility thanks to the Charlize Theron Cold War adaptation.

    "It's simultaneously the kind of title that no-one understands what it means, and it sounds very weighty at the same time," Charlie Chu jokes about his new title at Portland, Oregon's Oni Press.

    Formerly the senior editor on the publishing side of the company, Chu is now Oni's VP of Creative/Business Development, which means in practice that he's expanding his work with Oni Entertainment, the company's film and TV arm, while also pursuing business opportunities relating to Oni titles and creators, such as merchandise and the new Oni Games division, which launched in August.

    Chu has been with the division since it's 2015 formation. Oni is enjoying new levels of visibility thanks to projects like Atomic Blonde, the Charlize Theron action movie that grossed $95 million at the box office this year. Heat Vision spoke to Chu about Oni Entertainment's approach to the company's back catalog, as well as the reception Oni Games has had since its launch a little over a month ago.

    Before taking on this new position, you were an editor on Oni's publishing side while also working with Oni Entertainment. Was there much crossover between those two jobs?

    Part of the approach for Oni Entertainment is treating publishing and film/TV like church and state — we have a firewall in development to separate the publishing and the media side. Basically, it means that when we approach projects for development at Oni for film or TV, we're doing it organically, rather than trying to shoehorn comics into publishing with the intention of making them into films or TV, if that makes sense.

    So, basically, Oni Press and Oni Entertainment are two different companies, almost.

    I look at it this way: the biggest thing for us, in terms of Oni Entertainment, is that I have a bit of sweat equity in [publishing] editorial. The film and TV side of our business is coming from the perspective of being very Team Comics, and wanting to play defense on a certain level in terms of protecting the project and the title, and ensuring that that intent follows through in execution, but also making sure that the voices of the [comic book] creators are part of that. We're trying to bring the creators in as party to, and participant in, the collaborative process of making film and TV.

    That's not always the case, when it comes to adapting comic properties for other media. How has the reception been to that approach?

    We're figuring it out like everyone else is trying to figure it out as the film and TV business evolves. As somewhat of a boutique publisher with an idiosyncratic line, the way Oni is approaching film and TV is to lean into that curve, and not try to follow trends or the perception of what's happening in the buyer's market. If our books are idiosyncratic and doing things that are meant to be chasing after the [mainstream mass audience] zeitgeist — which is what Oni Press is trying to do — then our film and TV projects need to reflect that and double down on that as much as possible.

    We have books across many genres and across many target audiences. A lot of our reasons for wanting to go after books is predicated on wanting to work with creators who, we think, have a special voice. In terms of the translation for film and TV, sure, you might hear that the studio or the buyers are wanting this kind of product or this specific thing, but it's having the confidence and knowing that our library and our bench of creators is deep enough that we don't have to worry about whether the current flavor is, but knowing that our stuff is great and will be successful in the long run.


    Courtesy of Focus Features

    Is there a particular direction or project that you're looking at? Obviously, this summer saw the release of Atomic Blonde, based on an Oni graphic novel…

    At the end of the day, as much as I would want to say, "In a post-Atomic Blonde, post-Wonder Woman world, here's the next female espionage project we might have," it's less about trying to chase the new thing, it's about knowing, "Here's what the library looks like now, these are the titles that are coming up, here are some interesting titles in our backlist that might be appropriate for what we think the market looks like." We're not going to bend the truth of these titles to chase what the market is looking for.

    What is the market looking for these days, in terms of Oni properties?

    It's really fascinating. It's not as clear as it was a couple of years ago, in terms of things we have being very clearly feature-focused, as opposed to television-focused, or live-action versus animated. For us, each of the projects we're developing out of our library is unique in terms of process, because conversations are taking us everywhere.

    You're juggling Oni Entertainment with the biz dev side, which is an entirely different beast. How does that work, in practice? What does your day look like?

    It's... all a process [laughs]. It's a lot of different things, but one of the real strengths of developing Oni's properties on the non-publishing side of things is that the 20 year library of titles that James [Lucas Jones, publisher], Joe [Nozemack, founder] and everyone have created is so diverse, so table top games or getting to do something like a plush toy based on a character that we have, it's a lot of challenges, there's a lot of business partners for us to work with, but it's always very organic. I think that's one of the things that makes it very exciting. It's very easy to run this side of things in a way that you approach biz dev in a unilateral way, where with Oni — whether we're doing a book for the [comic store] market, the bookstore market, the library market, even a book from our erotica line Limerence — the development process on the business side can take you in far more interesting directions than you might expect upfront.

    Our push into tabletop through the Oni Games imprint, for example, has been interesting because, ultimately, that came down to the fact that we've been exhibiting at places like GenCon and shows like PAX, and just seeing that the boardgames market has grown — and also that, hey, we have a library of titles that could be fun boardgames, and also wouldn't look like your fantasy, zombie, sci-fi paradigm in the boardgame market. We saw a way to bring our properties into a market where they could feel like a breath of fresh air.

    Oni Games is just over a month old, at this point. What has the feedback been, to its launch? I've seen the comics side of the business be excited about the expansion into gaming, but has the gaming business been as welcoming?

    It's been phenomenal. I'm relatively new to the world of tabletop, I've only really gotten into it in the last three or four years as we've been exhibiting at shows like GenCon and PAX. I've been fascinated by how much business is done in boardgames, and how much this business has grown every single year. The imprint, reaction on the business side in talking with publishers, has been great. In a marketplace where people are succeeding with original IP, the idea of doing licensed titles… Your big fish, Star Wars, Game of Thrones or whatever, are spoken for, but the kind of titles that Oni publishes — that already have massive art assets and narrative — offer great vehicles to make great games.

    How do these deals come about? Are you hunting down prospective partners, do they come to you, or…?

    A lot of this business comes from fairly organic relationships that have grown quietly over the years, rather than this being a 'business bro-y' approach, if that makes sense. For a company like Oni, a good thing about doing conventions — beyond selling books and introducing the Oni Press line to a new readership — is that they serve as great home bases for us to take meetings, talk about our library and what other people are up to, cementing relationships.

    That's a recurring theme in what you're saying, I think; the relationships, whether it's with business partners or with the creators of the properties you're working with. You talked about playing defense for the creators…

    Philosophically speaking, from the 50,000 foot view, I look at my position at Oni as being very simple: it's about diversifying our revenue streams both for the books that we publish and the creators we work with. So, talking about making movies, TV shows, board games or toys, any kind of item — at the end of the day for Oni, they're an elaborate and direct brand extension that serves as a way of marketing and promoting the books themselves. A creator's going to spend all this time making this title; we want to be able to maximize their ability to profit off that work.
    Gene Ching
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  14. #14
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    Finally saw it and I must agree that it is a great film. Charlize Theron certainly has "The It Factor" when it comes to performing the action sequences. She comes across as more ferocious than Keanu Reeves in the John Wick movies. And the movie itself was very nicely shot. Most period movies* set in the 1980s are purposely made cheesy to spoof the era. Atomic Blonde actually has the atmosphere, the colors, and the '80s music, all woven together masterfully, and is in NO way a spoof. There is one sequence that is shot non-stop, without cuts, that outdoes, in difficulty, complexity (and length!), the famous one-shot sequences seen in Hard Boiled and Tom Yum Goong.

    I liked Atomic Blonde a LOT more than The Villainess, which, though they are vastly different movies, comparisons between the two are inevitable.


    *It's showing my age that movies set in the '80s are 'period' films. To me, and likely anybody over 40 or 50, the '80s don't seem all that long ago.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 12-18-2017 at 07:54 AM.

  15. #15
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    Atomic Blonde 2


    Charlize Theron’s Atomic Blonde is Getting a Sequel!

    1 week ago
    Alain Proviste

    Speaking to an audience at the San Francisco International Film Festival, Charlize Theron has confirmed the news that "Atomic Blonde 2" is moving forward.


    The Oscar-winning actress starred in the spy thriller alongside the likes of James McAvoy and John Goodman in 2017 and likely to reprise the leading role. It's not known if "John Wick" co-director David Leitch and screenwriters Kurt Johnstad, Antony Johnston and Sam Hart will return. There were no details other than Theron's statement: “We’re working on a sequel.”


    Set in Berlin during the waning days of the Cold War, Atomic Blonde centers around a spy who has to find a list of double agents who are being smuggled into the West. It's an adaptation of the 2012 graphic novel "The Coldest City" by Sam Hart and earned $100m at the global box office off of a $30m, which is more than enough for a follow-up.


    With "Mad Max: Fury Road" and "The Fate of the Furious", the movie will continue Theron’s recent streak of action movies. Her performance as the triple agent Lorraine Broughton has also ignited talks of a female James Bond and fans agree that she should be the one to finally play that role.
    Not a reliable source, but we'll take it.

    Atomic Blonde
    Atomic Blonde 2
    Gene Ching
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