Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Which kung fu styles are on the verge of becoming extinct?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    out there fer sure
    Posts
    422

    Which kung fu styles are on the verge of becoming extinct?

    This has been mentioned in the past in different circles but I am curious to know some deeper feedback:

    I know some hold the opinion that a few of the Hakka arts are getting close to evaporating(which is why I am honored to be learning Lung ying--southern dragon kf) and some have also said "Dog Boxing" and "duck fist".

    Any others?


    Thanks,
    LTN

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by LaterthanNever View Post
    This has been mentioned in the past in different circles but I am curious to know some deeper feedback:

    I know some hold the opinion that a few of the Hakka arts are getting close to evaporating(which is why I am honored to be learning Lung ying--southern dragon kf) and some have also said "Dog Boxing" and "duck fist".

    Any others?


    Thanks,
    LTN
    Probably more styles then we can name. Lau, Li, Mok and Choy all have very small followings.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,282

    Duck and dog have been resurging

    Both Duck and Dog have been appearing regularly in Shaolin performances for the last few years. The Shaolin performances are just that - performances - but it has stimulated some interest in the traditional root styles and triggered a small resurgence in both styles.

    For more on modern Shaolin animal styles, read Xiang Xing Quan: Inspiration from the Animal Kingdom By Stephen Chew and Shi Xu DeZheng in our NOV+DEC 2007 issue. I also wrote a two-part series (back when we published series) The Martial Menagerie: Exotic Animal Styles of Kung Fu. Part 1 was in OCT 1999 and Part 2 was in NOV 1999. Specific to Dog Style, read Shaolin Dog Boxing: An Interview with Master Zaipei Lin By Chen Pengcheng in our MAY+JUNE 2005 issue. I can't remember ever doing anything specifically on Duck Style. I'd welcome that.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    471
    I do not examples to give here. But I would to voice my view on why these styles are on the verge of becoming extinct. If we promote them more, then they will likely to become more popular, and vice-versa. The popularity of a style does not necessary reflect its skill level. One needs to look at its records in tournament.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    36th Chamber
    Posts
    12,419
    They are all obsolete. Extinct is just semantics.
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    As a mod, I don't have to explain myself to you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,885
    I won't list any specific styles, but IMO, promoting kung up styles more won't necessarily make them more popular *on the whole*. From what I see in today's environment, the only MAs gaining in popularity are the 4 accepted, standard arts used in MMA, and everybody knows what those are. Even most karate/TKD schools I see are mostly centered on kiddie and family karate, as opposed to the mostly hardcore, adult-centered schools common in the '70s. Except for MMA, interest in MA, period, has been on the decline. If this is true, then such declining interest will be even greater among many (most?) kung fu systems, which are far less common and far less available/promoted. They aren't 'where it's at' at this time.

    Suppose a practitioner of a 'Hakka' (or any other kung fu) system competed in MMA and made it into the UFC, and was able to clearly and successfully incorporate some of his kung fu into his fighting. Even that would not guarantee his style would be saved from obscurity and become more popular. At best, he would be treated as an anomaly among the pundits and the fans.

    OTOH, as long as there are SOME people who are dedicated enough to carry an art on, it won't become extinct. This will be true, even if none of US are ever aware of it.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 04-25-2017 at 08:22 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    shanghai
    Posts
    65
    In China there are thousands of regional styles, even local village styles. With the direction society here is headed, people just don't see any use in practicing martial arts. Kids are given so much homework they stay up until midnight doing it, on top of extra curricula classes like English, extra maths, piano etc.

    The fact is, with styles like Duck and Dog, the very fact that we are even discussing them on forums means that they have a certain amount of fame. Many village styles are totally unknown, and will not be passed on.

    OTOH some villages are working hard to preserve their styles. Shui Kou Men (https://monkeystealspeach.com/prayin...F%A3%E9%97%A8/), a groundfighting style from Shui Kou village, Shandong province, has now included their styles forms as part of the middle school PE curriculum.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    471
    Sure, promoting kung up styles more won't necessarily make them more popular *on the whole*. That means we do not always succeed in trying to get what we want. So to supplement my previous post, kung fu styles will become mainstream requires our effort to promote them. It won't happen by itself.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,282

    Some Kung Fu styles will always remain

    I don't really worry about Kung Fu going extinct. Sure, it's a loss and all, but some things, well, there time has passed. And to quote Williams from ETD "I don’t waste my time with it. When it comes I won’t even notice … I’ll be too busy lookin’ good."

    Kung fu for the future
    By Zhang Zefeng | China Daily | Updated: 2017-08-30 07:04


    Traditional Chinese martial arts are adored by many Chinese fans, including hostel founder Daniel Huang from Taiwan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

    Every day from 9 am to 5 pm, Liu Yi is busy at work as a human resources specialist in a State-run company in the Chinese capital. The demands of his job, which includes preparing regular career assessments, is much like that of many white-collar workers in the country.

    But out of the office, the 28-year-old leads a life that few of his colleagues know about-the Beijinger is a serious Chinese martial arts practitioner. He specializes in the Three-Emperor Cannon Fist technique.

    "Nowadays, fewer young people love what they do. They seldom cherish things because they believe nothing truly belongs to them," says Liu.

    "The Cannon Fist has become an integral part of my life."

    Liu started training in traditional martial arts at age 5. He now spends at least two weeknights honing his skills. On weekends, he meets his 53-year-old master, Wang Qi, to learn new techniques at the Temple of Heaven.


    Beijing-based TV and movie production manager Zhang Zehao. [Photo provided to China Daily]

    Their fighting skills are based on three legendary Chinese emperors-Fuxi, Shennong and the Yellow Emperor. Liu has been practicing the Cannon Fist, which focuses on speed and bursts of power, for nearly two decades. He says he still has a lot to learn.

    Many of his fellow disciples quit classes due to social commitments and the pressures of modern life, such as work and marriage, but Liu persevered. He spends his spare time collecting and organizing written and video materials related to traditional Chinese martial arts. He is widely expected to be Wang's successor.

    Liu is aware that certain types of kung fu, especially the less-known styles, are in danger of becoming extinct amid China's rapid economic development and the social transitions of the past decades.

    He considers himself one of the young people across the country who are not professional kung fu practitioners but who try to devote as much time as possible to preserve and hopefully pass on the intangible cultural heritage.

    A video clip of mixed martial arts fighter Xu Xiaodong knocking down self-proclaimed tai chi master Wei Lei within seconds went viral in April. The incident sparked a huge discussion in China about the merits of its traditional martial arts.

    The Chinese Martial Arts Association later responded to the incident, saying that such "arranged private fights" are a violation of the law as well as "the morals and values of martial arts".

    Liu says: "Traditional Chinese martial arts are not just about fighting skills. In modern society, imparting and inheriting these arts and the values attached to them are much more important than using them to fight."


    Liu Zhongyi, a financial director of a State-run company in Shandong.[Photo provided to China Daily]

    Beyond battles

    The value of martial arts lies in the philosophy, discipline and health aspects behind them, says Beijing-based TV and movie production manager Zhang Zehao.

    Unlike many youth who enjoy modern forms of entertainment, such as computer games, Zhang spent most of his holidays during primary and secondary school learning kung fu.

    "It was an important form of entertainment for boys of my age back in the northern countryside," the 38-year-old recalls.

    Zhang later focused on tanglangquan (mantis fist), a fighting style inspired by the namesake insect's movements.

    "Traditional Chinese martial arts are an irreplaceable part of our culture," says Zhang. "Fighting is only a part of it."

    For example, in contrast with Western heroes, who save the world with science or supernatural abilities, Chinese prefer to entrust heroes with unparalleled kung fu and its admirable values so that they can overcome evil, he says.

    Zhang himself tries to adhere to traditional Chinese martial arts' values, such as humility and respect for others, in his daily life.

    "Kung fu is an accumulation of the time and thought invested in pushing one's limits," he says.

    "You might not be invincible and beat all your competitors. But you benefit from the self-improvement that comes with the discipline of practicing it over the years."


    Traditional Chinese martial arts are adored by many Chinese fans, including hostel founder Daniel Huang from Taiwan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

    New challenges

    Many kung fu practitioners also worry about the obstacles in reviving traditional skills brought about by modern lifestyles and technology, with more people accessing martial arts information online at the expense of practical learning.

    "We live in an era where knowledge far outweighs skills," says 36-year-old kung fu practitioner Daniel Huang from Taiwan.

    "People know a lot about traditional Chinese martial arts, but that doesn't mean they can master it. There is a huge difference."

    Huang grew up in Canada. His enthusiasm for traditional Chinese martial arts started in high school. Since his early 20s, Huang has been learning Chinese martial arts with Adam Hsu, a Taiwan master and educator specializing in traditional northern-style kung fu.

    Hsu's kung fu possesses a distinctive beauty after years of practice, says Huang.

    "If you describe it in terms of Chinese calligraphy, his strokes (or moves) would be very elaborate, rather than flamboyant."

    In 2011, Huang established three hostels on the Chinese mainland to promote traditional Chinese martial arts. He regularly flies back to Taiwan to continue his training under Hsu.

    "We want to find and preserve the origins of traditional Chinese martial arts," says Huang.

    "It's like finding their stem cells, so that they can continue to evolve over time."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #10
    Wombat combat practical wombat method is a precious national treasure and world heritage that is in dire need of cultural excavation and rescue and generous funding from kind Lao wai

    25th generation inner door disciple of Chen Style Practical Wombat Method
    Officially certified by Ethiopian Orthodox patriarch Abune Mathias
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat™®LLC Practical Wombat Method. international academy retreat

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    shanghai
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by bawang View Post
    Wombat combat practical wombat method is a precious national treasure and world heritage that is in dire need of cultural excavation and rescue and generous funding from kind Lao wai
    Wombat Combat is very good

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •