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Thread: McGregor vs. Mayweather, August 26

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    Not bad at all, not great mind you but it could have been worse.
    Mayweather showed the expected ring-rust and McGregor showed the typical amateur fighting that I expected.
    Both fighters made a fortune from a fight that could only eery end up one way, great marketing you have to say

  2. #17
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    Much better than expected. As far as the 'early' stoppage, it was pretty clear that if it wasn't stopped at that point, Conor was going to go down anyway, and most likely would have gone down again had he been allowed to continue again after that. Conor may not have agreed with the stoppage as it was, but I think his brain will be thankful later on.

    Be interesting to see, if or when Conor returns to the UFC, how mentally 'up' he can get for a fight, after the mega-payday he received from this fight; a payday the UFC can never come close to approximating.

    It's quite amazing that only about 4 or 5 years ago, Conor was on welfare. And look at him now. Great story.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 08-28-2017 at 07:33 AM.

  3. #18
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    Alas, martial arts always seems to compete with itself

    McGregor vs. Mayweather vs. Birth of the Dragon - I'll have a BotD review up later today.

    Mayweather vs. McGregor Box Office: Fight Is a Knockout Victory in Theaters
    10:41 AM PDT 8/27/2017 by Pamela McClintock


    Christian Petersen/gettyimages
    Conor McGregor (left) and Floyd Mayweather Jr.

    Saturday night's live broadcast of the boxing bout grossed almost as much as new martial arts pic 'Birth of the Dragon.'

    Saturday night's super-fight between world boxing champ Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Irish MMA star Conor McGregor was a knockout victory in theaters, earning $2.6 million from 532 locations in North America locations to come in No. 8.

    Earlier on Sunday, comScore showed the special event earned $2.4 million from 481 theaters, but the grosses were later revised upwards for the U.S. and Canada.

    The result is one of the biggest victories ever for Fathom Events, which partnered with Mayweather Productions in beaming the boxing match into cinemas. In many theaters, the price of entry was north of $20.

    The card began at 6 p.m. PT. Mayweather emerged the victor in the 10th round, bringing his record to a perfect 50-0.

    The Mayweather-McGregor bout at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas was also a huge draw on pay-per-view at $99.99 a pop, although Showtime has yet to announce viewership numbers. Following the match, Periscope began trending on social media after many began bragging that they had watched the event for free using the streaming app.

    At the box office, the live broadcast of the fight in theaters scored the third-best showing of the day behind The Hitman's Bodyguard ($3.9 million) and Annabelle: Creation ($2.8 million), according to comScore.

    The Mayweather-McGregor offering saw its biggest grosses in New York City, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Nashville, San Diego and Miami. Top-grossing theaters included the AMC Empire and Regal Union Square in New York City, and Regal LA Live and AMC Burbank in Los Angeles.

    Despite showing in far fewer theaters, the match appears to have beat another fight-centric offering on the marquee over the weeked: martial arts pic Birth of the Dragon, from microbudget genre label BH Tilt and WWE Studios.

    Birth of the Dragon grossed $2.6 million from 1,618 locations, according to comScore (final weekend numbers will be tallied on Monday). The film, directed by George Nolfi, is a fictionalized account of when Bruce Lee challenged kung fu master Wong Jack Man to a fight in the mid-1960s in San Francisco.

    The Mayweather-McGregor showdown was the highlight of an overall dismal weekend at the domestic box office, with revenue tumbling 45 percent over the same frame last year. Summer revenue is now down more than 14 percent over 2016, while the year to date is down more than 5 percent.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Much better than expected.
    I agree with ya, Jimbo, although I didn't watch the fight in its entirety, only highlights. I was very amused by the netizen comments - so vitriolic and shallow - but I guess that's somewhat par for the course for any boxing match. I'm just happy to see boxing stage a reasonably successful event again. I've always enjoyed boxing as a spectator sport.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    Both fighters made a fortune from a fight that could only eery end up one way, great marketing you have to say
    Yeah, Mcgregor sold this fight, bigtime.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    Both fighters made a fortune from a fight that could only eery end up one way, great marketing you have to say
    I liked this fight for bringing striking back into the spot light endurance against people heavier than you is the most important skill.

    Taking all the styles out of it what would you say is the solution to mixed martial artists mixing training time between kickboxing and ground fighting if you face someone better than you that only wants to knock you out with stand up?.

    Conor gassed 7th round so your fighting a champ 100 pounds heavier than you lol round 6 you get tired go for takedown hoping to hold on and roll around for 30 seconds to get a break for the next round but the heavyweight champ simply pushes you aside stands up and starts kicking you in the back of the head.

    you stand up 15 seconds left, he drops you with jab cross hook hook flying knee bell rings. lol and so on until you drop not being able to punch with power gassed. should you have done less grappling or more steroids.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by diego View Post
    I liked this fight for bringing striking back into the spot light endurance against people heavier than you is the most important skill.

    Taking all the styles out of it what would you say is the solution to mixed martial artists mixing training time between kickboxing and ground fighting if you face someone better than you that only wants to knock you out with stand up?.

    Conor gassed 7th round so your fighting a champ 100 pounds heavier than you lol round 6 you get tired go for takedown hoping to hold on and roll around for 30 seconds to get a break for the next round but the heavyweight champ simply pushes you aside stands up and starts kicking you in the back of the head.

    you stand up 15 seconds left, he drops you with jab cross hook hook flying knee bell rings. lol and so on until you drop not being able to punch with power gassed. should you have done less grappling or more steroids.
    McGregor was done after the 5th round, he was already mouth breathing at that time.
    It wasn't so much his cardio I suspect, but his strategy.
    He did the typical "amateur" strategy when fighting a pro:
    Try for the early KO ( He knew he couldn't beat him going the distance).
    When he got gassed he did the typical rookie mistake: Go out strong in the beginning of the round.

    Mayweather, even though rusty from his almost 2 year layoff, fought HIS fight.

    And that, there, is the secret to beating an opponent:
    Fight YOUR fight and make the opponent NOT fight his fight.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    McGregor was done after the 5th round, he was already mouth breathing at that time.
    It wasn't so much his cardio I suspect, but his strategy.
    He did the typical "amateur" strategy when fighting a pro:
    Try for the early KO ( He knew he couldn't beat him going the distance).
    When he got gassed he did the typical rookie mistake: Go out strong in the beginning of the round.

    Mayweather, even though rusty from his almost 2 year layoff, fought HIS fight.

    And that, there, is the secret to beating an opponent:
    Fight YOUR fight and make the opponent NOT fight his fight.

    going into the fight I thought it would be interesting, Floyd is at the age when Tyson was fat looked like crap when he started losing at 40. Conor was bigger younger and I was curious how MMA combos would transfer over to strictly boxing..Conor takes head kicks to the face and Floyd is smaller so I knew Conor wouldn`t get punched out in the first two rounds like all the pro boxer fans thought.

    I guess taking head kicks and punches in MMA gives you good defense to take heavy shots from a pro boxer but at what point does a pro MMA fighters pro kickboxing skills move past amateur into pro boxer level. Like I think if they went best out of 5 Conor could take the third fight, it probably wouldn`t take that long to adapt MMA to pro boxing.

    Tyson was Champ age 20 it doesn`t take 20 years to go pro, Conor been fighting 10 years.

  8. #23
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    hi

    Is Maywhethor going to fight Mcgregor in the Mixed martial arts arena next by mixed martial arts rules ?

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firehawk4 View Post
    Is Maywhethor going to fight Mcgregor in the Mixed martial arts arena next by mixed martial arts rules ?
    Never gonna happen. Floyd Mayweather has already made it clear that was his last fight, and he has absolutely nothing to gain and everything to lose (ego and reputation-wise) by participating in a boxing vs. MMA match.

    Note:
    The Mayweather/McGregor fight was put on by Mayweather Promotions.

  10. #25
    Greetings,

    I saw bits of this. It was all I could stand. The referee was the oddest that I have ever seen. His shouting "Stop" instead of "Break" made me wonder about his qualifications. McGregor should have been disqualified for using the hammerfist and for rabbi punching. I did not watch enough to see if points were deducted from McGregor's scorecard.

    The use of an uppercut by Mayweather would have ended the fight much earlier; in other words, it was all entertainment folks. The taunting dwarfs were so desperately needed and were so missed.

    mickey

  11. #26
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    TBH, I think Floyd allowed Conor to hang in there with him long enough to keep his promise of an exciting fight, then decided the 10th was a good round to cap it off. I may dislike Floyd, but I think he was savvy enough to do that.

    If Conor had been in there with a top boxer with a style like Canelo Alvarez or Gennady Golovkin, IMO Conor would have been broken down and KO'd long before the 10th round. Conor's punching power did not seem to translate well into the boxing ring.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 09-05-2017 at 08:17 AM.

  12. #27
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    $4b

    The UFC ruined itself for $4 billion
    By Michael Blaustein September 14, 2017 | 10:35am


    Getty Images

    The great circus sideshow that was Conor McGregor’s detour into boxing is over, and UFC president Dana White could not be happier about it.

    “I’m ready to get back to the UFC and do what I do,” White said with a huge smile at the post-fight press conference in the early hours of the Sunday morning after the fight. “I’m not looking to do this again.”

    The truth of the matter is White has absolutely no say in the matter. And he knows it.

    “It takes two very special people in the right place at the right time to do the freakish kind of numbers and the water-cooler talk, all the things that this fight had. … This s–t doesn’t happen all the time,” White said.

    “I want to get back to business doing what I do, which is the UFC.”

    But nobody knows what the UFC even is anymore — including White.

    It used to be so simple. The UFC was where the best fighters in the world duked it out to see which martial art was best. Once that was figured out — it turns out that mixing striking, wrestling and jiu jitsu together is the way to go — the game evolved into a straight-up battle for supremacy. Men, and eventually women, were sorted into weight classes and fought to see who was the best at their size.


    White at the Mayweather-McGregor post-fight press conference.Getty Images

    Meritocracy was the bedrock principle from which the UFC built its hardcore fan base. Making the best fight the best was also how the UFC became a star-making machine because, unlike in boxing, the kings and queens of the organization were constantly under siege by up and comers. Therefore, anyone who could hold onto a belt for a long time was unquestionably great, and greatness is one path to stardom.

    The old UFC hit its pinnacle with Ronda Rousey, whose reign of unprecedented dominance came to an end just as uber talent agency WME-IMG stepped in and purchased the UFC for $4 billion.

    The May 2016 sale rocked the UFC to its core. On the management side, the man working in the shadows behind White, the company’s longtime match maker Joe Silva, announced his retirement. Worse still for the company as a whole, its stable of more than 500 contracted fighters all of a sudden knew exactly how much they were worth.

    For years, the UFC paid its fighters next to nothing because there was nowhere else for fighters to go and because there was no way for the fighters to know if they were getting a good deal or not. Unlike the NFL or NBA, nobody knew what franchises were worth or even if the sport had a viable future.

    As a result, the standard contracts for low-level fighters became what is called “5 & 5,” “10 & 10” or “20 & 20,” which means that the fighter is paid $20,000 to show up on weight on fight day and another $20,000 if he or she wins. Even champions coming in from other organizations, like Eddie Alvarez, were paid next to nothing. His first contract with the UFC paid him a measly “70 & 70,” according to MMA Junkie, a fact only revealed because his 2013 contract was part of a court case and thus became a public document. It is still the only full UFC contract to be made public.


    Eddie Alvarez gets punched by McGregor at UFC 205.Getty Images

    The UFC’s $4 billion price tag has opened the eyes of its best fighters, who are starting to demand bigger pay days. McGregor is the prime example of this new trend, but others are learning from his example. Flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson, the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world, has been fighting with White about money and marketing opportunities for months, and the UFC boss has retaliated by threatening to dissolve the entire division. Welterweight champion Tyron Woodley, meanwhile, said after his most recent fight, against Demian Maia, that he purposely fought conservatively because he was promised a super fight with Georges St-Pierre. That fight may never happen because Michael Bisping, the middleweight champion, hasn’t fought for nearly a year as he’s waited for the announced, then canceled, then re-announced gigantic GSP payday, which is finally set to go down at Madison Square Garden in November.

    While those three divisions are in monetary chaos, more belts are in purgatory for entirely random reasons. The 35-year-old heavyweight champion Stipe Miocic is tied for the most title defenses in the division’s history, with two, but got his last three wins over a 40-year-old, a 37-year-old and a 33-year-old, Junior Dos Santos, who recently failed an anti-doping test. Meanwhile, over in the light heavyweight division, Jon Jones’ own anti-doping problems mean that the promotion’s one-time glamour division is now headless. The women’s featherweight division can only look on in envy seeing as it lacks bodies. Period. The UFC’s own website only lists three female featherweights: champion Cristiane “Cyborg” Justino, the woman she defeated for the belt, Tonya Evinger, and Megan Anderson, who has never stepped inside the UFC cage.


    Jon Jones Getty Images

    In total, six of the UFC’s 11 divisions are in complete flux because of either money issues or unpredictable twists of fate. That leaves just five divisions in relatively good shape, and even some of those have question marks hanging over them. Nobody knows when McGregor will return to the lightweight division, the bantamweights have been on hold for nearly a year as champion Cody Garbrandt deals with a mysterious back injury, and dominant female champions Joanna Jedrzejczyk and Amanda Nunes have had trouble turning their awe-inspiring skills into pay-per-view buys.

    The UFC used to solve all these problems by turning the meritocracy knob to 11. That’s how the torch was passed from generational stars like Chuck Liddell and Randy Couture to the likes of St-Pierre and Anderson Silva.

    However, since the WME-IMG takeover, a new model has been adopted. Ridiculous mega fights are now the name of the game. WWE star CM Punk made his MMA debut at age 37 and was promptly bulldozed by a relative nobody at UFC 203. Bisping sidelined himself for a year in order to fight at Madison Square Garden against St-Pierre, who last fought in 2013 as a welterweight. Even Jon Jones, before he failed his USADA test and was stripped of the light heavyweight title, got in on the action by calling out Brock Lesnar, who is currently suspended for failing his own PED test.

    The Jones-Lesnar fight that will now, in all likelihood, never happen is the ultimate expression of the new UFC. It would have been an economic boon for both fighters. Already highly paid by MMA standards, Jones and Lesnar could have marketed the fight as “MMA vs. pro wrestling” just like McGregor and Mayweather played up “MMA vs. Boxing.” For good measure, Jones and Lesnar also could have thrown in cliche fighting storylines like “big (Lesnar) vs. small (Jones),” and “white farmer vs. cocky black athlete.”


    Brock Lesnar (left) fights Mark Hunt at UFC 200.Getty Images

    There is no doubt that Jones-Lesnar would have been a gigantic payday. It also would have been completely and utterly empty. Lesnar has been popped for steroids multiples times and has fought only once in the past five years. Jones, meanwhile, has his own PED problems and would have been ducking a fight with Alexander Gustafsson, the current #1 contender who battled Jones in 2013 in what many consider to be the greatest title fight of all time.

    Despite the extremely problematic Jones-Lesnar fight and the variously broken weight classes, White swears that things are just like what they were in the good old days.

    “The way that I look at fights, and the way that I look at fighting is that we’re going to have fights that we put on that are for the UFC hardcore fans, we’re going to have some fights that will do better than others. Then we’ll have some fights that are big where we do the Diaz-Conor 1.5 million [pay-per-view buys],” White said shortly after Mayweather TKO’d McGregor.

    Looking into the future, there is nothing to suggest that White can put on either type of fight.

    Dana White on McGregor V Mayweather
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
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    ttt 4 2018?

    YOB SHOCK Boozed-up louts used police tape as Karate Kid-style bandanas and pulled kung fu moves to mock Chinese tourists in Blairgowrie
    John Harrison and Robert Willemars shouted and swore at the coach party after drinking all night while watching the Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor fight. The visitors were so shocked they called police
    By Gordon Currie
    21st March 2018, 8:41 am Updated: 21st March 2018, 8:48 am

    BOOZED-UP yobs used a police cordon as Karate Kid-style bandanas then did kung fu moves in front of Chinese tourists.

    John Harrison, 23, and Robert Willemars, 22, shouted and swore at the coach trip party after drinking all night while watching the Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor fight on TV.


    HANDOUT - GETTY
    Pat Morita and Ralph Macchio in a scene from the film The Karate Kid

    The visitors were so shocked by the boxing fans that they called police.

    Perth Sheriff Court heard the pair had gone out to buy cigarettes in the early hours and found a sinkhole in the town which had been cordoned off by police with blue tape.

    Conor McGregor’s coach reveals just what makes the UFC icon so deadly
    They took the ribbon and tied it round their foreheads before high kicking and karate chopping in front of bemused passers-by.

    When the Chinese tourists, who were staying at a nearby hotel, spotted them they alerted cops.


    REUTERS
    John Harrison and Robert Willemars had been drinking all night while watching the Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor fight on TV
    Classy. Real classy.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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