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Thread: White Ape Exits Cave Application

  1. #1
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    White Ape Exits Cave Application

    As Gene said this forum is on the verge of death, thought I'd share a video to try to breathe a little life back in


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    Thanks shanghai-mantis

    Quote Originally Posted by shanghai-mantis View Post
    As Gene said this forum is on the verge of death, thought I'd share a video to try to breathe a little life back in
    I appreciate the assist.

    Do you have the Chinese for "White Ape Exits Cave"? I once learned a mantis form called "White Ape Steals the Peach", which was also a groin strike, but not this groin strike. I don't have the original Chinese but I could probably reconstruct it if I noodled about the web for a bit.
    Gene Ching
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Do you have the Chinese for "White Ape Exits Cave"?
    'Bai Yuan Chu Dong'. Maybe shanghai-mantis can post the Chinese characters for it?

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    Thanks Jimbo

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    'Bai Yuan Chu Dong'. Maybe shanghai-mantis can post the Chinese characters for it?
    That was enough to find it online easily: 白猿出洞

    Gene Ching
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I appreciate the assist.

    Do you have the Chinese for "White Ape Exits Cave"? I once learned a mantis form called "White Ape Steals the Peach", which was also a groin strike, but not this groin strike. I don't have the original Chinese but I could probably reconstruct it if I noodled about the web for a bit.
    Hi Gene

    The characters for the one you learned are 白猿偷桃. Did you pick that one up in Shandong from Yu Tianlu, or in the US? In Tanglang, the specific technique White Ape Steals the Peach is actually a knee (usually a jumping knee). The target is either the mid-section or the head, so the 'peach' in this case doesn't represent the groin as it does in some southern styles.

    BT

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    Thanks B.Tunks

    Quote Originally Posted by B.Tunks View Post
    Hi Gene

    The characters for the one you learned are 白猿偷桃. Did you pick that one up in Shandong from Yu Tianlu, or in the US? In Tanglang, the specific technique White Ape Steals the Peach is actually a knee (usually a jumping knee). The target is either the mid-section or the head, so the 'peach' in this case doesn't represent the groin as it does in some southern styles.

    BT
    Cool. Actually, I picked that up from my first Sifu, Wing Lam. He had three mantis sets that he learned in Hong Kong but I never knew what the lineage was. It was among a few odd sets he learned doing some exchanges. He never claimed to be a mantis master but he'd share them to interested students. He taught bung bo to any of his intermediate students that were curious. He rarely taught White Ape. I had to pry that one out of him. And I can't even remember what the third one was or if anyone learned it. I'm not sure he remembered it. I remember his bung bo but not the White Ape set.
    Gene Ching
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Cool. Actually, I picked that up from my first Sifu, Wing Lam. He had three mantis sets that he learned in Hong Kong but I never knew what the lineage was. It was among a few odd sets he learned doing some exchanges. He never claimed to be a mantis master but he'd share them to interested students. He taught bung bo to any of his intermediate students that were curious. He rarely taught White Ape. I had to pry that one out of him. And I can't even remember what the third one was or if anyone learned it. I'm not sure he remembered it. I remember his bung bo but not the White Ape set.
    Cheers. Interesting to see that many masters picked up Tanglang material on the side, beyond just the usual routines that were freely exchanged amongst Jingwu practitioners (such as beng bu/bong bo).

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    It does seem quite prevalent, doesn't it?

    Quote Originally Posted by B.Tunks View Post
    Cheers. Interesting to see that many masters picked up Tanglang material on the side, beyond just the usual routines that were freely exchanged amongst Jingwu practitioners (such as beng bu/bong bo).
    Perhaps it's because mantis forms are generally pretty short. It's surely an explanation for why there's so much variation in Bengbu.

    Funny this should come up now because I've been toying with writing a personal piece about this. It's a backburner article, for the web.

    Beyond the mantis, Wing Lam had a few Chaquan forms too. Of course, that was on top of his Bak Sil Lum, Tai Chi and Hung Gar (he took up Bagua and Xingyi later when he discipled under Grandmaster Sun Jianyun). I imagine most masters pick up a few odds and ends along the way. Makes me wonder what mantis masters pick up on the side.
    Gene Ching
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    Depends on the region I guess. Here in Shandong most mantis guys know some Tongbei and Long Fist. Sometimes some Ba Gua or Taiji as well.

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    In Taiwan, my first Mantis teacher (from Shandong) also taught various Changquan (Long Fist) styles, including Meihuaquan, Chaquan and Huaquan. I gor the impression that Long Fist was his primary system or preference.

    My second Mantis teacher in Taiwan (Taiwanese) actually began his MA training in Bajiquan before switching to Mantis (8-Step and some 7-Star). He also practiced and taught Hung Ga, and Chen Taiji. He also trained Yingzhaoquan (Eagle Claw, but NOT the same as the Ying Zhao/Fanzi style seen in the States) and Yanqingquan/Mizongquan, but didn't teach them. I only studied the Mantis with him. My teacher was unusual, because he was very good in each of them, but was able to keep them separate and distinct.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    In Taiwan, my first Mantis teacher (from Shandong) also taught various Changquan (Long Fist) styles, including Meihuaquan, Chaquan and Huaquan. I gor the impression that Long Fist was his primary system or preference.

    My second Mantis teacher in Taiwan (Taiwanese) actually began his MA training in Bajiquan before switching to Mantis (8-Step and some 7-Star). He also practiced and taught Hung Ga, and Chen Taiji. He also trained Yingzhaoquan (Eagle Claw, but NOT the same as the Ying Zhao/Fanzi style seen in the States) and Yanqingquan/Mizongquan, but didn't teach them. I only studied the Mantis with him. My teacher was unusual, because he was very good in each of them, but was able to keep them separate and distinct.
    Hi Jimbo,

    Was your first Tanglang teacher Gao Daosheng?

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    Quote Originally Posted by shanghai-mantis View Post
    Depends on the region I guess. Here in Shandong most mantis guys know some Tongbei and Long Fist. Sometimes some Ba Gua or Taiji as well.
    Yeah, a lot of Tanglang people in Shandong also practice/practiced Bagua and Tongbei. Also Cha Quan, Shuaijiao and some local styles like Sun Bin Quan. In the earlier days many also practiced Luohan Quan and various forms of Ditang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by B.Tunks View Post
    Hi Jimbo,

    Was your first Tanglang teacher Gao Daosheng?
    Hi.

    Yes, he was.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Hi.

    Yes, he was.
    Nice one! A great master for sure. As you would know, his master Wang Sonting was also a Long Fist specialist, though Gao also specialised in it either Qingdao or Jinan Guoshuguan as well. He was smart to coin the name Changquan Tanglang.

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    Shandong

    Quote Originally Posted by B.Tunks View Post
    Yeah, a lot of Tanglang people in Shandong also practice/practiced Bagua and Tongbei. Also Cha Quan, Shuaijiao and some local styles like Sun Bin Quan. In the earlier days many also practiced Luohan Quan and various forms of Ditang.
    Don't all Shandong masters do a little tanglang? I mean it's the cradle of mantis after all.

    Shandong has a rich martial tradition and a lot of Shaolin monks come from there, including several of the ones that I studied under directly. They all has some mantis too.

    And don't forget, Shandong is the setting of Outlaws of the Marsh, which feeds into the province's martial pride. There's styles that come from Liangshan in Shandong that echo Outlaws including Mizong and Ziwumen. I reported on that in our Jan+Feb 2014 issue cover story, The Kung Fu Legacy of Outlaws of the Marsh.

    We even produced some videos on it.


    Nice to hear y'all discussing stuff here again. Thanks for that.
    Gene Ching
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