Page 22 of 22 FirstFirst ... 12202122
Results 316 to 321 of 321

Thread: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Wuhan Pneumonia

  1. #316
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    collateral damage

    May 31, 2021
    9:28 PM PDT
    Sports
    As Japan loses training camps, Olympics buzz fades
    Tetsushi KajimotoDaniel Leussink

    4 minute read

    A visitor and the Olympic Rings monument cast shadows on the ground outside the Japan Olympic Committee (JOC) headquarters near the National Stadium, the main stadium for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan May 30, 2021. REUTERS/Issei Kato

    Ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, the Japanese city of Kamo spent 70 million yen ($640,000) on horizontal bars, gymnastic mats and other upgrades to training facilities for 42 Russian gymnasts and coaches who now won’t be coming.

    The team scrapped plans for pre-Olympics training in Japan because of the resurgent COVID-19 pandemic, local officials said. Officials in the northwestern city of 25,000 say they regret the lost opportunity to host the team, even more than the money spent.

    The Games, now less than eight weeks away after being delayed by a year, have been upended by COVID-19. Foreign spectators will not be allowed, and more than 100 municipalities have cancelled plans to host overseas teams.

    "Local kids who could be future star gymnasts were disappointed to miss the opportunity to meet the Russian gymnasts," Kamo official Hirokazu Suzuki told Reuters.

    Although there is little Olympic buzz in host city Tokyo, which is under a state of emergency because of the pandemic, in smaller places like Kamo, which had been planning the camp since 2019, the disappointment is perhaps more palpable.

    Most of the cancellations so far have been in the 500 or so municipalities involved in the Olympics "host town" programme, in which foreign teams base their pre-Games training in Japanese facilities.

    In some cases, such as Australia's judo team, the teams pulled out over safety concerns. In others, such as a delegation from Cuba set to stay in Higashimatsuyama city north of Tokyo, the municipalities decided not to host.

    Organisers say the Games will be held safely. Several opinion polls have shown most Japanese people want the event to be cancelled or postponed again.

    The national government earmarked 13 billion yen for municipalities to host training camps while imposing coronavirus measures, officials said.

    Municipalities apart from Tokyo were expected to see a boost of about $110 billion through 2030 from the Games, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government said in a March 2017 estimate.

    "Training camps will give a huge impulse to the economies of towns and cities where they are held, but that is being lost," said Katsuhiro Miyamoto, an emeritus professor of economics at Kansai University who studies the economic impact of the Olympics.

    SPORTS EXCHANGE

    Officials in Narita, east of Tokyo, were caught by surprise when the United States' track and field team informed them it had decided to pull out of planned a training camp.

    About 120 athletes and staff, including star sprinter Justin Gatlin, were set to come for the camp, said Kentaro Abe, a municipal official in charge of host town projects.

    Narita's sports relationship with the United States started in 2015, when it hosted the U.S. training camp before the world athletics championships in Beijing.

    "It doesn't mean that our efforts to promote sport exchange between Japan and the United States came to nothing," Abe told Reuters, adding that city would look to continue the relationship.

    In the central city of Toyota, home to the carmaker and Olympic sponsor Toyota Motor Corp, Canadian swimmers and coaches pulled out of pre-Olympics training scheduled to be held over about three weeks in July.

    Such cancellations could add to the pain for towns and regions that are already smarting from a drop-off in tourism.

    At her hotel in western Izumisano city, Eriko Tsujino worries she could lose about 60 bookings from Mongolian and Ugandan national teams if the athletes ditch plans to train in Japan.

    "If they were to cancel at the last minute, it would cause a huge loss," she told Reuters, saying the bookings had still not been confirmed because of the state of emergency.

    After the Russians cancelled their camp in Kamo, officials there decided at the last minute to host a much smaller Portuguese delegation of one female artistic gymnast and two accompanying staff, Suzuki said.

    But the city also sought to keep friendly relations with the Russian gymnasts, asking kids and other locals to show them support with making video messages and letters.

    ($1 = 109.8100 yen)

    threads
    Tokyo-Olympics
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #317
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    Our newest web article

    Did Covid close your school? READ Closing Doors, Open Arms: Part 2 by Kurtis Fujita



    threads
    Lots-of-Martial-Arts-Schools-Are-Closing
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #318
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) Wuhan Pneumonia

    UFC: ‘King of Kung Fu’ Muslim Salikhov says Covid-19 struggles ‘woke me up’, and now he’s on different level
    Dagestani faces fellow veteran Francisco Trinaldo at UFC Vegas 28 with an eye on a title run – and a return to fight in China
    ‘Now I’m in the best shape of my life,’ says Salikhov after shaking off long-term Covid-19 symptoms
    Topic |
    Coronavirus pandemic
    Mathew Scott

    Published: 2:23pm, 3 Jun, 2021


    Muslim Salikhov kicks Elizeu Zaleski dos Santos in their welterweight fight at UFC 251. Photo: Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC
    It takes a lot to stop Muslim Salikhov, as a record of being arguably the most successful martial artist to emerge from China’s domestic fight circuits might suggest.
    So when chest pain hit the 36-year-old welterweight in December, and he found himself hardly able to move, Salikhov knew something might be seriously wrong.
    “One morning I woke up and I couldn’t breathe, I couldn’t move,” says the Dagestani. “All I could do was sit in one position and focus on breathing, and on the pain in my chest. One whole day I sat like that.
    “I had been sick with corona in September, it wasn’t too bad. But I started to train again too early. You know as a fighter you want to train every day and to train as hard as you can. But then the chest pains came and the doctors found I had a blood clot, and it could have been dangerous.”

    The “King of Kung Fu” had of course battled through injuries across two decades of combat that saw him emerge as the first Westerner to be named the “King of Sanda” – as well as claiming multiple world titles – in the Chinese style of kick-boxing, before a move to MMA and to the UFC. But Salikhov had never felt anything quite like this.

    In the end, his months-long battles with the coronavirus forced him out of two scheduled fights, and he’s now not been seen since a split decision win over Brazilian Elizeu Zaleski (22-7) last July.

    Stories like Salikhov’s have echoed across the UFC this past 12 months, as a generation of fighters across all divisions have fought both the effects of Covid-19, and against their natural-born instincts to keep active, and to push themselves to the very limits of their physical abilities on a daily basis.
    Just when the 36-year-old Salikhov (17-2) had battled his way to the brink of a ranking with a 4-0 run, he had to stop, completely, and he had to wait for his body to heal.


    “That’s the lesson I learned,” says Salikhov. “When you get sick, you stop everything. That’s a hard lesson for fighters but now I’m in the best shape of my life. The experience woke me up. I eat better, I sleep better and I will fight better than I ever have before. I’m on a different level.”
    Muslim Salikov throws a punch at Laureano Staropoli at UFC Fight Night 162. Photo: SingaporeMaven
    And so now Salikhov’s journey begins again this weekend, when he takes on a fellow veteran in Brazilian Francisco Trinaldo (26-7) on the preliminaries of the UFC Vegas 28 card. He wants a finish.
    “He’s tough,” says Salikhov. “He’s old but he has good genetics so being 42 years old is not a problem for him. But I don’t think about that. I prepare like he’s a young man. I know I’m much better than him. I just need to keep winning. I like to finish fights. I don’t like decisions, and that’s what I will aim for again.”
    That Salikhov came to the UFC relatively late – he signed at 33 – has leaned a sense of urgency to his rise up the ranks. He wants a crack at a ranked welterweight and to win his way towards a title shot. But he also knows the clock is ticking – something that was drummed home during his recovery from Covid-19, when Salikhov had plenty of time to think.
    UFC fighter Muslim Salikhov in action during his wushu days in China. Photo: IWUF (International Wushu Federation)
    “Maybe next fight I will get a big name, it doesn‘t matter who,” he says. “I know to get that chance I have to do all I can on Saturday and I have to keep my run going. I’ve been thinking a lot about what is coming next and my fans in China say they want to see me again.
    “Everybody keeps talking about [11th-ranked] Li Jingliang. You know many people in China are waiting for this. I have a lot of fans. He’s also very popular. If we fight I think China will be 50-50. For Chinese fans sanda is still more important and I represent them. They love me and I would love to show them what I can now do in MMA.”
    In the shape of Trinaldo this weekend Salikhov faces a fighter also feeling time encroaching, as evidenced by the fact weight issues have sees him move up a division for the first time. That Trinaldo was once a feared kick-boxer in his own land – and a state champion in the sport – reveals how this one is likely to play out. It should be fast, and furious.
    “But I know I am better than him,” says Salikhov. “It feels like I have been away for a long time. But I am better than ever.”

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Covid-19 struggles put Salikhov ‘on a different level’


    Mathew Scott

    Mathew Scott is a Hong Kong-based journalist who specialises in mixed martial arts. He covers the UFC, One Championship and Asian MMA.
    Salikhov is mentioned in a few other threads here (which I may copy over someday) but he deserves his own indie thread.

    threads
    Muslim-Salikhov
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #319
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    Reopening the Great Star

    I must revisit soon.
    LOCAL
    //
    HEATHER KNIGHT
    Reopening Chinatown's Great Star Theater is a gamble for this couple. It could pay off for them and community

    Photo of Heather Knight
    Heather Knight
    June 9, 2021
    Updated: June 9, 2021 4 a.m.

    Great Star Theater in San Francisco, Calif., on Monday, June 7, 2021. Roger and Alice Pincombe have taken over the nearly abandoned 96-year-old theater in Chinatown and restored it. Photos by Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle

    San Francisco’s small businesses suffered greatly over the past 15 months. So did nonprofits. So did performing arts venues. So did movie theaters. So did Chinatown.

    So it might seem like the worst possible time to start a new venture that combines all of those into one hugely risky gamble, but Alice Chu and Roger Pincombe are betting big. And here’s hoping their efforts pay off.

    This month, the married couple, who live in an apartment in Twin Peaks and work as software engineers for Salesforce, will reopen the Great Star Theater on Jackson Street after signing a 10-year lease. They’ve formed a nonprofit called, fittingly, the Great Star Theater, and have sunk $150,000 of their own money and donations into the massive project of restoring the theater to its former glory.

    They’ll have a soft opening this weekend and plan to hold an official launch complete with lion dancers in the street on June 18.

    “We’re excited to open and put people back to work and start that community back up,” Pincombe, 33, said of giving the city another venue for live arts groups that lost nearly all their revenue during the pandemic. “There’s always something up in the air, but it always comes together so beautifully.”

    Pincombe’s face lights up when he talks about the theater, and his goal is to make it his full-time work. Chu, 31, who moved from China’s Henan province 10 years ago to obtain her master’s degree in computer science at the University of Southern California, seems to be the practical one and said she’s definitely staying at Salesforce.

    “Slow down! Slow down!” she kept telling her husband as he chattered excitedly while giving me a tour of the theater the other day. “She isn’t done writing!”

    They showed off the new red upholstery on the theater’s 410 seats after the droppings from birds nesting overhead proved disastrous to the previous seat covers. They showed off lovely bathrooms with touchless faucets and art and calligraphy made in China by Chu’s parents hanging on the walls.

    They showed off a huge, used movie screen they installed. Eighty-five new fire sprinklers they added since the old ones were 50 years out-of-date in terms of code compliance. A traditional Chinese altar where actors can pray before going on stage. A downstairs lounge for actors that’s decorated with a mural painted by Chu.

    “We’re honoring the history of the theater, but also making it cleaner and more comfortable,” Pincombe said. “If you could have seen what this place looked like in November when we took over. There have been a lot of last-minute headaches.”

    The theater opened in 1925 as a venue for Chinese opera singers, and Pincombe said Bruce Lee spent time there as a kid watching his dad, Lee Hoi-chuen, a Cantonese opera singer, perform.

    But those wondrous years are long gone — and the theater had become dirty, derelict and abandoned. Sporadic movies, plays and operas showed over the years, but attendance required being OK with revolting bathrooms with no hot water, thick layers of dust and general grunginess.

    The lowest point came in 2015 when the body of a 31-year-old woman was found inside the theater, and police arrested the man who was leasing the space at the time on suspicion of homicide. Prosecutors did not file charges against him due to lack of evidence.


    Paul Nathan (left) and John Anaya prepare for the June 10th opening of Devil in the Deck at Great Star Theater in San Francisco, Calif., on Monday, June 7, 2021. Roger and Alice Pincombe have taken over the nearly abandoned 96-year-old theater in Chinatown and restored it.Scott Strazzante / The Chronicle
    So nothing about the theater exactly screamed opportunity and excitement. Except to Chu and Pincombe.

    They attended a circus-themed show there on their first date after meeting on a Chinese dating app and reached out to its landlord to ask about managing the theater. She finally got back to them last summer, and they settled on lease terms in November. The couple declined to provide the details.

    They’re hoping their newly beautiful theater will draw crowds to the neighborhood who will go out to eat and drink after the shows — a mix of movies, plays, variety shows, circuses and others. Chinatown’s small businesses suffered during the pandemic not only from strict shelter-in-place rules, but also racism fueled by the former president’s insistence on calling the coronavirus the “Chinese virus” and even “kung flu.”

    The recent spate of violence against Asian people, particularly elders, has also negatively impacted Chinatown and its residents’ feelings of safely walking around their own neighborhood.

    Chu said she’s reached out to many local organizations to introduce herself and her husband and see how the couple and their new theater can help.

    Amy Lee, 29, is the founder of Revive SF Chinatown, a group that aims to bring young people back to Chinatown, holds weekly events to support neighborhood businesses and organizes larger events. Lee grew up near Chinatown and recently moved back to her childhood home.

    “Pre-pandemic, the businesses were surviving, but the atmosphere was obviously different,” she said. “It wasn’t as happy compared to when I was growing up. People don’t really come and stay — they come and do their errands and then go home to the Richmond and Sunset.”

    She said she’s “very excited” about the reopening of the Great Star Theater and already has tickets to one of its first shows.

    “Having a space that provides entertainment and something that brings joy is very important,” she said.


    An altar backstage at Great Star Theater in San Francisco, Calif., on Monday, June 7, 2021. Roger and Alice Pincombe have taken over the nearly abandoned 96-year-old theater in Chinatown and restored it.Scott Strazzante/The Chronicle
    Jeff Lee, vice president of the 88-year-old Wah Ying Club, a Chinatown social group, said he remembers being the only one of his mother’s six kids growing up in Chinatown who would begrudgingly attend Chinese operas with her at the Great Star.

    “The condition was after the opera, she’d take me out for a midnight snack,” he said with a laugh.

    He said his group and the wider neighborhood is excited about the reopening.
    threads
    Great-Star-Theater-Chinatown-San-Francisco
    Chinatown-San-Francisco
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #320
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    live frogs

    Trending in China
    Chinese man who ate five live frogs ‘for strength’ hospitalised with parasitic infection

    He had hoped the folk remedy could help him get stronger after he broke two bones in years past
    Other people in China have got sick after eating frogs hoping to get stronger
    Topic |
    China Society
    Mandy Zuo
    Published: 7:00pm, 11 Jun, 2021


    A man in China was hospitalised after he got a parasitic infection from eating five live frogs. Photo: Getty Images
    A man in eastern China developed a parasitic infection after swallowing five live frogs because he believed they would make him stronger, a local hospital said.
    The man, aged 53 and surnamed Sun, ate the amphibians after his fellow villagers told him they could give him more strength.
    He was taken to hospital after he developed a persistent fever and weakness, said the First Affiliated Hospital of College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in an article posted on WeChat on Thursday.
    The man, surnamed Sun, ate the frogs because he believed it would give him strength. Photo: Martin Williams
    The farmer routinely worked the fields in the Yuhang district of Hangzhou, the capital of Zhejiang province. Sun told doctors earlier this month that he caught the frogs near the farmland and swallowed them whole.
    Sun said he decided to try out the folk remedy because he wanted to improve his fitness after suffering breaking his collar bone and a shoulder blade several years ago.
    “I caught five frogs in total and they were all quite small, about a thumb’s length each,” he was quoted as saying.
    He had to go to three hospitals to find the cause of his mysterious illness. He did not realise the frogs might be the cause, so he did not tell the doctors about them until the final stop made a detailed inquiry.
    By then, he had had a fever for about two weeks, and his lungs had shown multiple lesions and fibrosis, doctors said.
    Every year, we receive patients infected with parasites. A great portion of them fall ill because they eat improperly.
    First Affiliated Hospital of College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in an article posted on WeChat
    A biopsy later suggested that Sun was infected with Spirometra mansoni, a tapeworm commonly found in frogs.
    Luckily, the worms had not invaded his eyes or brain, the two organs in the human body that are most prone to infection. If that had happened, Sun would have experienced symptoms similar to a stroke.
    He has now recovered after anti-parasitic treatment, according to the article.
    “Every year, we receive patients infected with parasites. A great portion of them fall ill because they eat improperly,” said Qu Tingting, a doctor from the hospital’s infectious disease department, in the WeChat post.
    The live frog remedy is a folk medicinal practice that is widely adopted in other parts of China.
    A 26-year-old man from Changsha, Hunan province, was found to have been infected by the same parasite in the brain after he ate “plenty of” frogs during his childhood in the hopes of helping to heal a bone injury, the Changsha Evening News reported in January.
    He never thought eating the frogs was risky until one day he could not speak clearly and lost the use of his limbs in early 2021, the news report said.
    Other people eat frogs’ larvae, also believing they will give them strength.
    In April 2018, a video showing a woman making a young girl eat live tadpoles on Weibo triggered a public outcry. The woman said they would help the kid keep healthy while serving her a bowl of swimming tadpoles with a spoon.



    Mandy Zuo

    Mandy Zuo joined the Post in 2010 and reports on China. She has covered a wide range of subjects including policy, rural issues, culture and society. She worked in Beijing before relocating to Shanghai in 2014.
    threads
    Weird-stuff-in-TCM-List-it!
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #321
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,053

    masked mercy

    June 16, 2021
    4:41 AM PDT
    Last Updated 4 hours ago
    Asia Pacific
    Giant Buddhist goddess in Japan gets face mask to pray for end of COVID-19

    Reuters

    2 minute read

    June 16 (Reuters) - Workers scaled a giant statue of a Buddhist goddess in Japan on Tuesday to place a custom-made mask on her face, an act meant to be a prayer for the end of the coronavirus pandemic.

    It took four workers three hours to carry the massive mask on ropes up the 57 m-high (187 ft) white statue of the Buddhist goddess Kannon - the Goddess of Mercy - at the Houkokuji Aizu Betsuin temple in Fukushima Prefecture.

    They then unfurled the mask made with pink net fabric, measuring 4.1 m by 5.3 m and weighing 35 kg (77 pounds), across the lower half of the statue's face.


    A drone picture shows a mask placed on a 57-metre-high statue of Buddhist goddess Kannon, to pray for the end of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic at Houkokuji Aizu Betsuin temple in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan in this handout photo taken on June 15 2021. OISO ALL SUPPORT/Handout via REUTERS

    The statue, built 33 years ago, is hollow with a spiral staircase that can be climbed to the height of the goddess' shoulder. People visit the statue, which is holding a baby, to pray for the safe delivery of babies and to ask for blessings for their newborns.

    Temple manager Takaomi Horigane said workers came up with the idea for the face mask in discussions on the restoration of the statue after it was damaged in an earthquake in February.

    Horigane said they plan to keep the mask on the statue until the COVID-19 situation is under control in Japan.

    Reporting by Rikako Maruyama and Akira Tomoshige; Writing by Karishma Singh; Editing by Tom Hogue
    threads
    Kwan-Yin-is-a-He!
    covid
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •