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Thread: China floods

  1. #1
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    China floods

    China is a large country so it experiences lots of natural disasters. We've been tracking quakes, but not floods.

    Dozens killed, hundreds of thousands displaced as China floods
    By Associated Press
    5:08pm Jun 12, 2020

    Heavy rains have continued to batter southern China, causing riverbanks to burst, inundating homes and flooding farmlands, state media reported.
    More than a dozen people have been killed in the floods since they started on June 2.
    The central Chinese metropolis of Chongqing was hit hard on Thursday, triggering a level three emergency flood response.
    Millions have been affected by the heavy rains in Guangxi, Hunan, Chongqing, and other southern provinces, and hundreds of thousands have been evacuated since the flooding started.


    Floodwaters surround a village in Yangshuo in Guilin in southern China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Some residents have been killed by flooding in a wide swath of central and southern China. (AP/AAP)

    Over a thousand houses have collapsed, state media reported, and property damage due to the rains have been estimated at over 4 billion RMB (565.5 million US dollars).
    Rescue crews have been deployed across the country to save people from flooded homes and take them to temporary shelters.
    Seasonal flooding generally causes heavy damage each year in the lower regions of China's major river systems, particularly those of the Yangtze and the Pearl to the south.


    A young boy is carried to a boat by rescuers during an evacuation of a flooded village in Qingyuan in southern China's Guangdong province. (AP/AAP)

    Authorities have sought to mitigate the hardship by using dams, particularly the massive Three Gorges structure on the Yangtze.


    Vans and cars are washed down a street in China. (Twitter)

    China's worst floods in recent years were in 1998, when more than 2,000 people died and almost three million homes were destroyed.
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  2. #2
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    I'm never going to Wuhan

    China
    Wuhan residents told to stay indoors again after record rainfall
    City at centre of coronavirus outbreak faces new crisis as China suffers weeks of flooding
    Lillian Yang and Lily Kuo in Beijing
    Mon 6 Jul 2020 08.06 EDTLast modified on Mon 6 Jul 2020 08.41 EDT


    A flooded road in Wuhan, Hubei province, on Monday. Authorities raised the emergency warning to the second-highest level, forecasting more rain. Photograph: China News Service/Getty Images

    People living in Wuhan, the central Chinese city that bore the brunt of the country’s coronavirus outbreak, have been told stay indoors once more after record rainfall prompted authorities to raise the city’s emergency response to the second highest-level.

    A prolonged period of heavy rain is the latest disaster to strike China, where people are only just recovering from the coronavirus outbreak.

    State media have been accused of downplaying the severity of the floods, emphasising the heroic efforts of emergency workers by publishing prominent images of soldiers rescuing trapped residents.

    Residents waded waist-deep along waterlogged streets in Wuhan, filled after a record 426mm (16.8 inches) fell between Sunday and Monday morning. Authorities raised the four-tier emergency warning to level two on Monday, predicting more severe weather in the coming days.

    The country is braced for more flooding, after weeks of what has been for some regions the heaviest rainfall in decades triggered severe flooding and mudslides in almost every province, affecting more than 20 million people and resulting in direct economic losses of at least £4.7bn.

    China’s national weather service has issued rainstorm warnings for more than 31 consecutive days. “This has rarely been seen in recent years,” the state-run People’s Daily wrote on Weibo. At least 121 people have died or gone missing and more than 875,000 people have been forced to relocate, according to China’s ministry of emergency management. But internet users have questioned why the rains have received so little attention.

    “Why does our official media say nothing about the severe floods in the south of our country,” one user wrote on Weibo. Another said: “The topic of flooding is like a tattoo – covered up.”

    Mingbai Zhishi, an independent social media account or “self media”, wrote: “The floods raging in the south will not be quiet, but unlike in the past, the media are not rushing to report it. It really is quiet.”

    Several areas of Hubei, of which Wuhan is the capital, have already flooded. Torrential rain in Jingmen flooded shops and supermarkets. Helen Hai, 25, in Changyang county east of Wuhan in Hubei province, described driving and passing landslides and rocks falling along the mountain roads. The windscreen wipers were useless against the fast and constant downpour.

    “It was like driving blind, like driving in the water,” Hai said. The rains, which flooded areas like hers last weekend, were unceasing. “The rain poured non-stop from morning until night. It was very frightening and I feel it is very unusual.”

    Elsewhere, in the city of Tongren in Guizhou province in the mountainous south-west, the floods formed a giant waterfall in the city centre. In Chongqing, in Sichuan province, more than 100,000 people were evacuated as dozens of homes were destroyed.

    On 29 June, after weeks of heavy rains and floods, the Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, gave his first public statement on the crisis, calling on the country to “put people first and value people’s lives most in the fight against the floods”, according to the official news agency Xinhua.

    Experts say officials are also obscuring the danger of the dams in rivers across southern and south-western China where the floods have been the worst. “This is their tradition. They never disclose how the disaster is made or why it has happened,” said Wang Weiluo, a Chinese hydrologist and outspoken critic of the giant Three Gorges hydroelectricity plant.

    “Most people think floods are caused by extreme weather but it is mainly caused by the discharge of reservoirs and the result of flood control works,” he said.

    Wang believes the actual losses may be greater than official reports. The recent example of the coronavirus outbreak, where authorities at first did not disclose the risk of contagion and punished whistleblowers such as Li Wenliang, a doctor, is instructive, according to Wang.

    “Blocking information is the beginning of a disaster. Any flood starts when the information is blocked. Just like Li Wenliang said: ‘A healthy society should not only have one voice.’ “In China, there is only one voice of the central meteorological station and when that one is wrong, everyone gets the wrong information.”

    Hai is not surprised that the authorities would want to downplay the crisis. “It is very common. They have been doing this for a long time, not just with flooding but also other problems,” she said. “It is hard for me to judge the government data but I tend to expect the real situation is worse than they claim.”
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  3. #3
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    First pestilence, then floods


    China has just contained the coronavirus. Now it's battling some of the worst floods in decades

    By Nectar Gan, CNN
    Updated 5:18 AM ET, Tue July 14, 2020
    Parts of China wrecked by raging flood waters

    (CNN)Weeks of torrential rains have caused the worst flooding in China in recent decades, destroying the homes and livelihoods of millions of people as the country struggles to revive an economy battered by the coronavirus pandemic.

    Since June, devastating floods have impacted 38 million people -- more than the entire population of Canada. Some 2.24 million residents have been displaced, with 141 people dead or missing, the Ministry of Emergency Management said Monday.
    On Sunday, Chinese authorities raised the country's flood alert to the second highest level in a four-tier emergency response system. Chinese President Xi Jinping described the flood control situation as "very grim" and called for "stronger and more effective measures" to protect lives and assets.


    Rescuers evacuate residents on a raft through flood waters in Jiujiang in central China's Jiangxi province on July 8.

    The unfolding disaster comes as China is still reeling from the aftermath of the coronavirus.
    The pandemic and a weeks-long shutdown throughout much of China dealt a historic blow to the country's economy. GDP shrank 6.8% in the first quarter, the first contraction that Beijing has reported since 1976. The country promised in May to throw 3.6 trillion yuan ($500 billion) at its economy this year in tax cuts, infrastructure projects and other stimulus measures as part of a bid to create 9 million jobs and blunt the fallout from the pandemic.
    The flooding is likely to complicate those recovery efforts. Some of the worst affected areas include many of the regions hardest hit by the coronavirus, just months after they emerged from strict lockdown measures.
    While summer flooding is a common reoccurrence in China due to the seasonal rains, this year's deluge is particularly bad. It has hit 27 out of the 31 provincial regions in mainland China, and in some places, water levels have reached perilous heights not seen since 1998, when massive floods killed more than 3,000 people.


    Floodwaters flow past a residential building in Chongqing in southwest China on July 1.

    A total of 443 rivers nationwide have been flooded, with 33 of them swelling to the highest levels ever recorded, the Ministry of Water Resources said Monday.
    The majority of these rivers are in the vast basin of the Yangtze River, which flows from west to east through the densely populated provinces of central China. The river is the longest and most important waterway in the country, irrigating large swathes of farmland and linking a string of inland industrial metropolises with the commercial hub of Shanghai on the eastern coast.
    This year, the summer rains arrived early and poured with unusual intensity. Over the past weeks, the average precipitation in the Yangtze River basin reached a record high since 1961, authorities said.
    "Compared with before, this year's rainfall was more intense and repeatedly poured down on the same region, which brought significant pressure on flood control," Chen Tao, the chief weather forecaster at the National Meteorological Center, was quoted as saying by Xinhua.


    This aerial view shows a bridge leading to the inundated Tianxingzhou island in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on July 13.

    Sweeping floodwaters left a trail of devastation, ravaging 8.72 million acres of farmland, destroying 28,000 homes and in some cases submerging entire towns.
    According to state news agency Xinhua, by Sunday, the floods had caused 82.23 billion yuan ($11.75 billion) of economic losses nationwide.
    In central China's Hubei province, which accounted for more than 80% all of China coronavirus cases, historic levels of rainfall were recorded in several cities, causing widespread floods and landslides. As of Thursday, more than 9 million residents have been affected in the province of 60 million people, causing 11.12 billion yuan ($1.59 billion) of economic losses, Xinhua reported.
    Last week, authorities in the Hubei provincial capital of Wuhan, the original epicenter of the coronavirus, raised the city's flood alert level to the second highest, after days of heavy downpours submerged many of its roads and a waterfront park.


    Residents swim past a riverside pavilion submerged by the flooded Yangtze River in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on July 8.

    Further downstream on the Yangtze River, in eastern Jiangxi province, the water levels in China's biggest freshwater lake, the Poyang Lake, rose to a historic high of 22.52 meters (74 feet), well above the alert level of 19.50 meters (64 feet), according to Xinhua.
    As of Sunday afternoon, floods had disrupted the lives of over 5.5 million people in the province, with nearly half a million evacuated from their homes, China's state-broadcaster CCTV reported.
    The flooding is unlikely to subside as more heavy rains are forecast for the coming days. On Tuesday, the China Meteorological Administration issued a blue alert for heavy rain from Tuesday to Saturday in multiple provinces in the country, including Sichuan, Hubei, Anhui, Jiangsu and Zhejiang.
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    qigong vs floods?

    Police dismiss video of Chinese qigong master holding back floods
    Source: Global Times Published: 2020/7/15 19:13:03


    A man in Lengjiang, Central China's Hunan Province, is chanting while making dancing, rolling and meditating movements on a square half engulfed in water. Photo: Screenshot of a vedio posted by the Paper

    A video titled 'Qigong master sends back floods in Lengjiang, Central China's Hunan Province', has been spreading on Chinese social media recently.

    In the video posted by the Paper, a man is seen chanting while making dancing, rolling and meditating movements on a square half engulfed in water to assuage the roaring floods, while some people carrying umbrellas stood by and watched. The man was believed to be practicing qigong, a Chinese breathing exercise that is sometimes described in martial arts novels as being able to physically control objects using an invisible power.

    The video racked up millions of views and also sparked criticism, with many denouncing it as sensationalist and indecent, especially when people are fighting hard to tackle the floods, which have severely hit southern China.

    "If this kind of superstition works, why do the soldiers have to work so hard to fight the flood on the front line?" a netizen asked.

    Local police rejected the rumor on Monday after an investigation, and said it was just footage of local residents holding a fish release and blessing ceremony.
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    At the Buddha's feet

    With so much news, the China floods have gone relatively unnoticed.

    China record floods wet feet of Leshan Giant Buddha
    9 hours ago


    REUTERS

    A giant statue of Buddha in China has had its toes dampened by floodwater for the first time since the 1940s.

    The 71m-tall statue, a Unesco heritage site, was carved out of a rockface near Chengdu in Sichuan province around the eighth century AD.

    It is normally high above the waterline, but the area has been hit by the worst flooding in 70 years.

    More than 100,000 people have had to be moved to safety.

    The statue is a hugely popular attraction and often included in cruises along the nearby Yangtze river and Three Gorges.

    State media said 180 tourists had be rescued from the site as waters rose.


    GETTY IMAGES
    The statue normally sits high above the waterline, as seen here in February


    GETTY IMAGES
    Tourists and pilgrims arrive by boat to burn offerings at the Buddha's feet


    GETTY IMAGES
    The last time the toes - each bigger than a person - got wet was 1949


    GETTY IMAGES
    But last week waters reached the base of the statue and kept rising

    According to the Xinhua state news agency, a traditional local saying holds that if the Buddha's feet get wet, Chengdu - which has a population of 16 million people - will flood too.

    Sichuan province has activated its highest level emergency response after weeks of heavy rain caused record high water levels, with no sign of it ending soon.


    GETTY IMAGES
    Rescuers have been despatched to help people evacuate from at-risk areas

    Flood alerts are in place for provinces around the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai, Songhua and Liao rivers, with warnings of possible landslides.


    GETTY IMAGES
    Chongqing has already battled several waves of flooding this summer

    The statue, just outside Chengdu, is a hugely popular attraction and often included in cruises along the nearby Yangtze.

    Officials have warned that huge volumes of water are building up behind the Three Gorges dam - a massive hydroelectric project on the Yangtze.

    The Ministry of Water Resources has warned this could lead to severe flooding upstream, including the major city of Chongqing
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  6. #6
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    China floods: Three Gorges dam gushes with water while streets are submerged

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  7. #7
    China's summer of floods....oh my!!

  8. #8
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    China floods

    I saw a photo today on social media of the Wushuguan staircase cascading with rain.

    Subway passengers trapped waist-high in floodwaters as Chinese river banks burst
    4 hrs ago

    BEIJING (Reuters) -Heavy rain pounded the central Chinese province of Henan on Tuesday, bursting the banks of major rivers, flooding the streets of a dozen cities and trapping subway passengers waist-high in floodwaters.

    Resident wearing a rain cover stands on a flooded road in Zhengzhou, Henan province© Reuters/STRINGER Resident wearing a rain cover stands on a flooded road in Zhengzhou, Henan province

    Henan, a populous province double the size of Austria, has been hit by storms since the weekend in an unusually active rainy season.


    No deaths or casualties have been reported, but the daily lives of the province's 94 million people have been upended by transport closures.

    In Zhengzhou, the capital of Henan on the banks of the Yellow River, more than 200 mm of rain fell in one hour on Tuesday, forcing the city to stop all subway train services.

    Dramatic video shared on social media showed commuters waist-deep in murky floodwaters on a subway train and an underground station turned into a large, churning pool.

    Henan is a major logistics hub but train services were suspended, while many highways were closed and flights delayed or cancelled.

    In Ruzhou, a city southwest of Zhengzhou, streets have been turned into torrents, sweeping away cars and other vehicles, footage on social media showed.

    A rising Yi River also threatened to hit the Longmen Grottoes, a UNESCO World Heritage site featuring millennium-old Buddhist statues etched into limestone cliffs near the city of Luoyang.

    Like the Longmen Grottoes, the Shaolin Temple in Dengfeng city, famous in the West for its martial arts, has been temporarily shut.

    Also in Dengfeng, an aluminium alloy plant exploded on Tuesday as water from a river surged into the factory.

    At least 31 large and medium-sized reservoirs in the province have exceeded their warning levels.

    From Saturday to Tuesday, 3,535 weather stations in Henan saw rainfall exceed 50 mm, of which 1,614 registered levels above 100 mm and 151 above 250 mm.

    The highest was in Lushan city, which saw 498 mm of rain, according to the provincial weather bureau.

    "This is the heaviest rain since I was born, with so many familiar places flooded," said an internet user in the inundated city of Gongyi on Chinese social media.

    Rain is forecast to stop by Thursday.

    (Reporting by Ryan Woo; Editing by Nick Macfie)
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  9. #9
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    12 dead

    Flooding in central China turns streets to rivers, kills 12
    Vehicles are stranded after a heavy downpour in Zhengzhou city, central China’s Henan province on Tuesday, July 20, 2021. Heavy flooding has hit central China following unusually heavy rains, with the subway system in the city of Zhengzhou inundated with rushing water. (Chinatopix Via AP) (Uncredited/CHINATOPIX)
    By Associated Press
    Yesterday at 10:50 p.m. EDT


    BEIJING — At least 12 people died in severe flooding Tuesday in a Chinese provincial capital that trapped people in subways and schools, washed away vehicles and stranded people in their workplaces overnight.

    The already drenched city of Zhengzhou, the capital of Henan province, was hit by 20 centimeters (8 inches) of rain from 4 to 5 p.m., the official Xinhua News Agency said, citing the Henan weather agency.

    The torrent of rain turned streets into rapidly flowing rivers and inundated subways stations and cars. Videos posted online showed entire neighborhoods covered in waist-deep water and vehicles floating in the muddy mire.

    To the north of Zhengzhou, the famed Shaolin Temple known for its Buddhist monks’ mastery of martial arts was badly hit. Henan province is home to many cultural sites and a major base for industry and agriculture.

    Xinhua said 12 people had died and 100,000 people had been moved to safer places.

    Stranded people were spending the night in their workplaces or checked into hotels.

    Wang Guirong, a 56-year-old restaurant manager, said she planned to sleep on the couch in her restaurant after being told there was no power in her neighborhood. The State Grid Zhengzhou Power Supply Co. said a downtown substation was forced to shut down because of the rain.

    “I have lived in Zhengzhou all my life and have never seen such a heavy rainstorm as today,” Wang said.

    China experiences regular flooding during the summer, but the growth of cities and conversion of farmland into subdivisions has raised the impact of such events.

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  10. #10
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    Make that 25

    Worst in a millennium? How do they know that?

    JULY 21, 20214:07 AMUPDATED AN HOUR AGO
    At least 25 dead as rains deluge central China's Henan province
    By Ryan Woo, Stella Qiu

    5 MIN READ


    BEIJING (Reuters) -At least 25 people have died in China’s flood-stricken central province of Henan, a dozen of them in a subway line in its capital Zhengzhou, and more rains are forecast for the region.

    About 100,000 people have been evacuated in Zhengzhou, an industrial and transport hub, where rail and road links were disrupted. Dams and reservoirs have swelled to warning levels and thousands of troops are taking part in the rescue effort in the province.

    Twelve people died and more than 500 were pulled to safety after a subway tunnel flooded, state media reported, while social media images showed train commuters immersed in chest-deep waters in the dark and one station reduced to a large brown pool.

    “The water reached my chest,” a survivor wrote on social media. “I was really scared, but the most terrifying thing was not the water, but the diminishing air supply in the carriage.”

    The rain halted bus services in the city of 12 million people about 650 km (400 miles) southwest of Beijing, said a resident surnamed Guo, who had to spend the night at his office.

    “That’s why many people took the subway, and the tragedy happened,” Guo told Reuters.

    At least 25 people have died in the torrential rains that have lashed the province since last weekend, with seven missing, officials told a news conference on Wednesday.

    Media said the dead included four residents of the city of Gongyi, located on the banks of the Yellow River like Zhengzhou, following the widespread collapse of homes and structures because of the rains.

    More rain is forecast across Henan for the next three days, and the People’s Liberation Army has sent more than 5,700 soldiers and personnel to help with search and rescue.

    From Saturday to Tuesday, 617.1 mm (24.3 inches) of rain fell in Zhengzhou, almost the equivalent of its annual average of 640.8 mm (25.2 inches).

    The three days of rain matched a level seen only “once in a thousand years”, the Zhengzhou weather bureau said.

    Like recent heatwaves in the United States and Canada and extreme flooding seen in western Europe, the rainfall in China was almost certainly linked to global warming, scientists told Reuters.

    “Such extreme weather events will likely become more frequent in the future,” said Johnny Chan, a professor of atmospheric science at City University of Hong Kong.

    “What is needed is for governments to develop strategies to adapt to such changes,” he added, referring to authorities at city, province and national levels.

    ‘FLOOD PREVENTION DIFFICULT’

    Many train services were suspended across Henan, a logistics hub with a population of about 100 million. Highways have also been closed and flights delayed or cancelled.

    By Wednesday, media said food and water supplies had run out for hundreds of passengers stranded on a train that had stopped just beyond the city limits of Zhengzhou two days earlier.

    Roads were severely flooded in a dozen cities of the province.

    “Flood prevention efforts have become very difficult,” President Xi Jinping said in a statement broadcast by state television.

    Dozens of reservoirs and dams breached danger levels.

    Local authorities said the rainfall had caused a 20-metre breach in the Yihetan dam in the city of Luoyang west of Zhengzhou, and that the dam could collapse at any time.

    In Zhengzhou itself, where about 100,000 people have been evacuated, the Guojiazui reservoir had been breached but there was no dam failure yet.

    Chinese companies, insurers and a state-backed bank said they had offered donations and emergency aid to local governments in Henan amounting to 1.935 billion yuan ($299 million).

    SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS CUT OFF
    Taiwan’s Foxconn, which operates a plant in Zhengzhou assembling iPhones for Apple, said there was no direct impact on the facility.

    China’s largest automaker, SAIC Motor, warned of short-term impact on logistics at its plant there, while Japan’s Nissan said production at its factory had been suspended.

    Schools and hospitals were marooned and people caught in the floods flocked to shelter in libraries, cinemas and museums.

    “We’ve up to 200 people of all ages seeking temporary shelter,” said a staffer surnamed Wang at the Zhengzhou Science and Technology Museum.

    “We’ve provided them with instant noodles and hot water. They spent the night in a huge meeting room.”

    After the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou, the city’s largest, lost all power, officials raced to find transport for about 600 critically ill patients.

    The neighbouring province of Hebei issued a storm alert for some cities, including Shijiazhuang, its capital, warning of moderate to heavy rain from Wednesday.

    Reporting by Sameer Manekar in Bengaluru, Josh Horwitz and Jing Wang in Shanghai, and Stella Qiu, Roxanne Liu, Cheng Leng, Yilei Sun, Judy Hua and Ryan Woo in Beijing; Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard in Taipei, Beijing Newsroom and Kanupriya Kapoor in Singapore; Editing by Kenneth Maxwell, Clarence Fernandez and Angus MacSwan
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  11. #11

    Flooding at the temple

    Not good at all.

    Even if it's not too deep here, flood waters at that speed can be deadly.


  12. #12

    Huge explosion in Deng Feng, when flooding hits aluminium plant



    Edit to add, apparently this was in Gao Cheng Cun, about 10km SE of Deng Feng city, and no one was hurt.

    Last edited by rett2; 07-23-2021 at 05:47 AM.

  13. #13
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    Saddened to hear this...hoping for the best.

    All things are impermanent.

    Henan ramps up efforts to save cultural relics from extreme rains
    By Global Times
    Published: Jul 21, 2021 11:43 PM


    Longmen Grottoes scenic area in Central China's Henan Province is closed to the public on July 20, 2021 due to the flood hitting the province. Photo: CFP

    All the cultural relics from the Longmen Grottoes have been well protected against the unprecedented heavy rainfall that hit Central China's Henan Province in recent days causing 25 deaths as of Wednesday. Landslides occurred nearby archaeological sites, like Zhengzhou Shang City and the Shaolin Temple, amid extreme weather, but the cultural relics remained intact.

    A number of major cities in Henan have been affected by the rains and some local museums and archaeological digging sites were flooded, according to a post by the National Cultural Heritage Administration on its official WeChat account.

    A video posted on social media on Tuesday shows the Shaolin Temple on Mountain Songshan being hit by heavy floods after unusually heavy rains. All the scenic spots in the area were closed to the public.

    Many splendid pieces of cultural and artistic highlights of ancient China have been discovered in Henan's numerous archaeological sites.

    The death toll has climbed to 25, with 7 missing in Zhengzhou on Wednesday. A total of 1.24 million residents have been affected in the province that has been ravaged by torrential rains with 160,000 being evacuated as rescue operations continue in the province, led by the People's Liberation Army.

    Local authorities in Henan also made calls to save the cultural relics with various measures, including water pumping and drainage operations and increased inspections, to make sure both cultural relics and people are safe.
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