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Thread: Wang Lin

  1. #1
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    Wang Lin

    Maybe it's the photo but he's a weird looking dude.
    Qigong 'master' Wang Lin holed up in Hong Kong
    Thursday, 01 August, 2013 [Updated: 6:02AM]
    Patrick Boehler patrick.boehler@scmp.com


    Qigong practitioner Wang Lin

    Controversial self-proclaimed "qigong master" Wang Lin broke his silence from a chic Hong Kong hotel room to compare his situation to that of NSA whistle-blower Edward Snowden.

    Qigong practitioner Wang LinWang has been accused by mainland media and one of his disciples of conducting illegal medical practises and claiming he has supernatural powers.

    "It's as if the whole country has turned against me, turning black into white and white into black," Wang told The New York Times in his first public comments since the controversy surrounding him erupted on the mainland a week ago. "It's truly beyond my comprehension."

    Wang confirmed he is hiding out in an unspecified Hong Kong hotel, having acquired permanent residency in the city 18 years ago. He denied any wrongdoing and said he was the target of corrupt political dealings.

    "If I go back, I'll certainly be arrested," Wang said.

    His appearance in Hong Kong comes as condemnation of his spiritual martial arts practices reaches fever pitch on the mainland. State-owned media outlets have portrayed his qigong healing skills as a hoax that had helped him amass an enormous fortune and gain the confidence of leading officials.

    Two news programmes called Wang "a vulgar magician" who made a living "deluding celebrities and blinding the public". People's Daily said that people like Wang Lin were purveyors of "spiritual opium".

    Photos of Wang's limousines and luxury villa have been widely circulated online, along with images of him with former Hong Kong chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, ex-Politburo Standing Committee member Jia Qinglin , disgraced railways minister Liu Zhijun, actors Jackie Chan and Jet Li, and others.

    In a 1997 companies registry filing, Wang appears as a director of the Hong Kong-based Australia Chinese Friendship Association Ltd.

    The Melbourne-based Australia Chinese Friendship Society had no knowledge of such a company, its president, John Breheny, told the Post by phone.

    Records also show that since 2008 Wang has been one of three directors of the Kowloon Bay-based Hui Long Holdings Ltd., with registered capital of HK$100 million. The company has been involved in construction projects in Yichuan, an hour's drive from his hometown, according to local government statements.

    Wang's court case against former disciple Zou Yong began this week. Zhou, who Wang claims owes him 33 million yuan (HK$41.42 million), has provided information for press attacks against Wang.
    Wang Li: Qigong “Master” a Conjurer of Cheap Tricks?
    By Jonathan DeHart
    July 31, 2013

    Two documentaries aired on China’s state-run CCTV on Sunday calling Wang Lin a “vulgar magician” who has done little more than sell bogus health techniques to the Chinese masses – not to mention some of its elite.

    The qigong (Taoist breathing exercises meant to cultivate energy) spiritualist and advisor has fallen on hard times since the investigative reports played on television sets across the nation and has since come under investigation for fraud. The Jiangxi province-born “master” is reportedly attempting to evade scrutiny by disappearing from sight – some say by fleeing to Hong Kong.

    Wang’s fall from grace has become a major topic of discussion in China, given his celebrity clientele, which included some of China’s most prominent entertainment, business luminaries – even heads of state – from Jackie Chan and Jet Li to Alibaba founder Jack Ma and Hong Kong’s former chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, as well as relatives of former Chinese President Hu Jintao.

    The prominence of 61-year-old Wang’s following was not in doubt, although some of his practices were strange by any standards. From “creating snakes” after placing scraps of paper under an upside-down basin which he jostles around until two snakes issue forth (see video here) to shredding steel with his bare hands, recovering paper from ashes, and even retrieving “an incinerated banknote intact from an orange” – some of his exploits are truly bizarre.

    While actions such as these can be dismissed as magic tricks, things become morally hazy with some of his health suggestions. Wang has claimed to heal cancer and other serious illnesses, including removal of three “stones” from the body of former Indonesian president Suharto. All told, Wang estimates he has worked with some 50,000 patients.

    Wang has dismissed claims that his practices are illegal, claiming that he has undergone rigorous investigation by a team of 17 Japanese scientist over a period of seven days, and has received numerous offers from U.S. intelligence agencies attempting to lure him to their shores with the promise of a green card.

    He claims that he began to cultivate his supernatural powers from age seven under the tutelage of an Emei Taoist priest.

    Despite accusations that he is a charlatan, Wang claims he donates up to 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) annually to charity – a claim that is backed by Pan Zhongwu, deputy director of social assistance at Pingxiang’s Civil Affairs Bureau.

    Sima Nan, well known as a debunker of pseudoscience, invited Wang to Beijing to prove his claims, offering $1.6 million to anyone who can prove they have supernatural powers.

    Wang has not taken criticism or questioning lightly, cursing at least one journalist. “I am telling you, you will die miserably, and your family will follow," Wang told a reporter with The Beijing News last week after she wrote a story that he thought damaged his name.

    If convicted of illegal practice, he has a lot to lose. With the dubious earnings he has raked in, Wang has procured three Hummers and a Rolls-Royce that has been spotted parked in front of his five-story villa in his hometown of Pingxiang, Jiangxi province, nicknamed “the palace” due to the fact that his surname means “king” in Mandarin. He is also known to drive a Porsche and owns further properties in Shenzhen, Nanchang and Hong Kong.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  2. #2
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    More on Wang Lin

    This article is 'highly cited'.
    Supposed telekinetic qigong healer can't dispel skepticism
    English.news.cn 2013-07-30 23:56:22

    NANCHANG, July 30 (Xinhua) -- Self-proclaimed "qigong master" Wang Lin lived a luxurious life away from the public eye for two decades, but pictures of him receiving celebrities at his home in east China's Jiangxi Province have changed that.

    Since the photos popped up online earlier this month, video clips of Wang resurrecting beheaded snakes, recovering paper from ashes and shredding steel with his bare hands have circulated online.

    Alongside these outrageous feats, stories of him curing people of illnesses in exchange for large sums of money have also surfaced.

    Wide media coverage of his so-called "supernatural powers," his unprecedented popularity among the elite and his fortune have drawn skepticism from social science professors, people devoted to discrediting pseudoscientific claims and the general public.

    They are asking: Does he really possess supernatural powers? Did he accumulate his wealth through legal means? Has he been carrying out illegal medical practices?

    SUPERPOWER OR SUPER TRICK?

    Wang Lin told the daily Beijing News in a July 22 interview that he had once been assessed by a team of 17 Japanese scientists for seven straight days and nights.

    He also said that U.S. intelligence agencies offered him 70 green cards to try to persuade him to emigrate, but he turned them down because of his attachment to his hometown.

    When Sima Nan, an online celebrity famous for debunking pseudoscientific claims, questioned Wang about whether the "miracles" achieved through his qigong mastery were simply magic tricks, Wang became offended and said he could kill Sima with his fingers from just a few meters away.

    In his self-published book "Chinese People," Wang claimed he could use thought to transport materials, which is the highest level of qigong practice.

    Qigong, which combines breathing, physical exercise and mental training methods based on Chinese philosophy, is practiced by people from China and around the world for the purposes of strengthening the body, maintaining health, meditating and training in martial arts.

    Wang told the Beijing News that he has cured many patients, including former President of Indonesia Suharto.@ However, doubts have been cast by a skeptical public, who believe he's simply doing magic tricks, not harnessing telekinetic powers.

    "He knew some tricks for summoning cigarettes and wine from thin air, but that was only magic," a man who worked with him on a farm in Yifeng County for more than ten years said.

    "I never heard of him being able to cure disease," said the man who declined to be named.

    According to the person in charge of the farm, Wang served prison terms in the 1970s for sexual harassment.

    Wang refused to respond to the claim.

    Zhou Xiaozheng, a social science professor with Renmin University of China, said similar tricks are common in magic shows at home and abroad.

    MASTER OR CHARLATAN?

    Wang lives in a five-story villa in Luxi County. With three Hummers and a Rolls-Royce parked in the yard, he is known as the county's richest person.

    Wang was a no-show in court on Tuesday, when his trial over a property dispute with a former disciple opened in Nanchang City.

    The Jiangxi Provincial Higher People's Court began hearing the case in which Zou Yong, a businessman who formally acknowledged Wang as his master before November 2012, is suing Wang over a housing contract dispute involving more than 30 million yuan (4.8 million U.S. dollars).

    The trial opened a day after authorities in Jiangxi's city of Pingxiang, Wang's hometown, opened an investigation into Wang's alleged illegal medical practices.

    China Central Television (CCTV) on Sunday broadcast an investigative report on Wang, describing him as a swindler who made his fortune by fooling celebrities and government officials.

    Prior to the trial, Zou, chairman of the Pingxiang-based Jiangxi Tianyu Fuel Group, said he paid 5 million yuan in fees to become Wang's disciple in 2009, but Wang did not teach him ways to master qigong. "Most of the time he asked me to practice on my own."

    Wang, on the other hand, said he never fooled people into giving him money.

    "I'm not this kind of person, or I wouldn't have so many billionaires as my friends," Wang said in an interview with Xinhua.

    He added that whether he has supernatural powers or not, he performs for fun just two or three times a year and does not make money from it.

    CURIOUS OR GULLIBLE?

    Billionaire Jack Ma Yun, former Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun, and movie stars Jet Li, Vicki Zhao Wei and Li Bingbing are just a few of the high-profile clients that have gone to Wang's villa for help.

    After pictures taken of Wang Lin surfaced online, Li Bingbing and Jack Ma Yun quickly explained their involvement with him.

    Li Bingbing acknowledged to the Beijing News that she once sought help for her mother's illness. She added that it will take time to see if Wang's treatment is effective.

    Jack Ma Yun, on the other hand, wrote on Sina Weibo, China's Twitter-like microblogging platform, "My friends often criticize me for showing interest in 'non-scientific' knowledge. Exploration, appreciation and curiosity in the unknown have always been my interest. Finding out the secrets behind the unknown is exciting."

    However, many Internet users are curious about why Wang's supposed feats have piqued the interest of so many superstars and high-ranking officials.

    Zhou Xiaozheng said curiosity and superstition led people to visit Wang. "But unfortunately, Wang did not safeguard corrupt officials like Liu Zhijun from downfall."

    "Ignorance and corruption are the reasons why 'masters' like Wang rise to fame," said Sima Nan.

    QUACK DOCTORS

    Cases like Wang's are not that unusual, as people claim to have the power to cure illnesses from time to time.

    In 2010, Zhang Wuben, a self-proclaimed nutritionist, became a guru overnight through his food therapy forums on a television program. His hallmark theory held that mung beans could be a panacea and his book, "Eat Out the Diseases You Have Eaten," became a best-seller.

    Zhang's medical qualifications were later exposed as false and his theories have been refuted, as followers failed to find a cure to their diseases through expensive consultations with Zhang.

    In 2011, Ma Yueling, once considered the "Health Godmother" in China, claimed that she cured diseases ranging from cancer to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through a variety of unorthodox treatments.

    It later came to light that Ma was a nurse without the necessary certifications or qualifications to prescribe treatments.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    Even more on Wang Lin

    Qigong 'master' hit with firearms allegation
    Updated: 2013-08-05 20:09
    ( chinadaily.com.cn)

    Police in Jiangxi province have launched an investigation into Wang Lin, a self-proclaimed master of qigong and Taoist philosophy, on suspicion of illegal possession of firearms, the Beijing News reported on Monday.

    The investigation was launched by the public security bureau of Luxi county on Aug 1 after Wang's former apprentice, Zou Yong, disclosed in an interview with a video website that Wang had possessed a rifle unlawfully and once used it to shoot birds.

    According to Criminal Law, those unlawfully possessing guns may face imprisonment of up to seven years in serious circumstances.

    Wang Lin, who became famous around the 1990s, has mostly kept a low profile in recent years. However, he returned to the spotlight last month after photos were released showing him meeting with several famous people. These included Ma Yun, the billionaire founder and ex-CEO of the Alibaba Group, Zhao Wei, a famous actress, and Jet Li, a famous kung fu actor.

    Many people expressed shock that such successful entrepreneurs and actors could fall prey to an alleged charlatan like Wang.

    The newspaper also reported late last month that Wang had been accused of fraud and could face punishment for allegedly practicing medicine without a permit.

    Since the controversy started in July, Wang Lin is reported to have moved to Hong Kong, where he has residency.

    A Chinese snake-conjuring qigong master sparks ire about China’s festering problems
    By Lily Kuo @lilkuo July 25, 2013



    A wealthy Chinese martial artist who claims he can conjure snakes from empty bowls and heal cancer just lost one of his most important sources of power: obscurity. Wang Lin, a 61-year-old qigong teacher known in his small town in Jiangxi province for his healing powers, is now in headlines in Chinese media after a Beijing Times report (article in Chinese) delved into Wang’s life and began questioning not just the source of his fortune, but also his supernatural abilities.

    According to the report, Wang’s real power isn’t so much the healing he offers to clients, which he has credited for his growing fortune over the past 20 years. Instead, the report alleges, he is paid handsomely to connect wealthy business people to powerful officials in the government. The story says Wang lives in a five-story villa and owns two Hummers as well as one Rolls Royce. Wang disputed the story and reportedly “cursed” the journalist who wrote it. (Wang, on a microblog account, said he never threatened the reporter.)


    Wang Lin with relatives of former Chinese leader Hu JintaoSina Weibo / 1215031834

    The story and the back-and-forth have caused a flurry of commentary on Chinese internet forums. That China’s rich and powerful would be taken by Qigong, a Chinese martial art based on ancient Chinese philosophy that has mostly gone out of style in China since the communist revolution, is weird enough. In one online poll (registration in Chinese required), most Chinese online respondents said they don’t believe in its supernatural ability.

    But the allegations also speak to the grievances regular citizens have against Chinese elites: classism, a culture of guanxi, or connections, and conspicuous wealth. One post, a slideshow of photos of Wang with celebrities and officials has been forwarded over 15,000 times and garnered over 6,000 comments. One blogger wrote, “Troubled evildoer, crafty witchcraft. Master Wang Lin is a mirror of official corruption.” Several referred to Wang as a “monster,” using a phrase once used by Mao Zedong to describe the party’s enemies that translates roughly as “a cow’s ghost, serpent spirit.” One blogger said, “These people should be expelled from the party.”


    Wang Lin with Chinese actress Li BingbingSina Weibo / szliyong

    According to the report, Wang’s followers are not local villagers; He hardly ever treats locals and instead focuses on China’s highest social strata. Photos from a collection Wang kept labeled “Chinese people” have been circulating online. He is shown posing with former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin’s sister, as well as Hu Jintao’s sister, a former Chinese health minister, the head of China’s Supreme People’s Procuratorate, the highest agency for state prosecutions, actor Jet Li, and Ma Yun, founder of Chinese e-commerce firms Alibaba and Taobao. One blogger, according to the blog Offbeat China, wrote, “From these pictures, one can understand China. These rich and powerful crawl under the feet of Wang. It’s both laughable and pitiful. We are truly living in the worst of times.”

    Watch Wang conjure a snake out of a basin, starting at about two minutes and 33 seconds. (It takes about four minutes.)
    I didn't watch the vid yet.
    Gene Ching
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    an update

    forgot about this guy for a moment

    Qigong master dodges court hearing, visits Taiwan
    Weng Luyi and Staff Reporter
    2013-10-20
    08:54 (GMT+8)


    The controversial qigong master Wang Lin, claimed a fraud by the Chinese government. (Photo/CNS)

    Qigong imposter Wang Lin paid a visit to Taiwan, as confirmed by the nation's National Immigration Agency on Thursday. He reportedly landed in Taiwan on Oct. 16 from Hong Kong and departed the following day.

    Wang is facing seven charges in China, including fraud and illegal medical practices. He failed to show up at a court session on July 30 and his whereabouts remain unknown.

    Wang had reportedly fled to Hong Kong, but Wang himself told the Chinese media that he had entered Taiwan without trouble from authorities, said the Beijing News on Thursday.

    NIA official Hsu Chien-lin said that Wang has not been convicted and is only being investigated by Chinese authorities. He cannot be labeled a fugitive.

    Moreover, Taiwan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs did not have the authority to prohibit Wang's entrance because China's authorities have not issued an international arrest warrant or requested Taiwan to bar him from setting foot on the island, Hsu added.

    He further stated that Wang came to Taiwan as an independent traveler. The customs officials do not question visitors' itinerary based on personal freedom and no one reported any illegal activities by Wang during his stay.

    Wang rose to fame in the 1990s as a master of qigong, a system of training the body's qi, or energy, for use in martial arts and healing. He maintained close relations with several government officials, entertainers and entrepreneurs, which helped him boost his influence.

    The self-proclaimed qigong master is also known to be good at forging relationships with celebrities. He always has his picture taken when seen with a noted public figure, which has helped him build a positive public image.

    According to an official from the Department of Health in Jiangxi province, Wang has been charged for indulging in illegal medical practices, bribery, bigamy, gambling, tax evasion, fraud and the illegal possession of firearms.
    Gene Ching
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    Wang Lin - no evidence he had practised medicine illegally

    Probe finds no evidence that celebrity Qigong ‘master’ practised illegally
    PUBLISHED : Monday, 06 July, 2015, 6:24pm
    UPDATED : Monday, 06 July, 2015, 6:24pm
    Ellis Liang
    ellis.liang@scmp.com


    Celebrity qigong master Wang Lin pictured with former Hong Kong chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen. Photo: Xinhua

    JIANGXI – An investigation into self-proclaimed qigong “master” Wang Lin has found no evidence he had practised medicine illegally, People’s Daily reports.

    Several celebrities accused Wang in 2013 of charging exorbitant fees for medical services and claimed he had no expertise. The health bureau in Luxi county later confirmed to state media that he indeed lacked any formal qualifications. It said he had avoided the suspicion of the authorities by running his clinic inside his home in Pingxiang.

    Over the next two years, county authorities checked 198 clinics in 138 villages and 11 townships but could not find anyone who had been treated by Wang, nor did they find any record he had advertised his medical practice.

    They recently wrapped up their investigation and concluded his claims about curing people using qigong were just lies.

    Qigong practitioners claim they can manipulate qi – the basic particle of matter in nature described by the philosopher Zhuangzi almost 2,000 years ago.

    Wang, who once claimed he was a billionaire, attracted a large number of followers and high-profile clients, often opening up his five-floor villa and garden to visiting celebrities and journalists.

    Photos of Wang’s limousines and villa have circulated widely online, along with images of him with former Hong Kong chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, ex-Politburo Standing Committee member Jia Qinglin , disgraced railways minister Liu Zhijun, actors Jackie Chan and Jet Li, and others.

    Since the accusations emerged, Wang has stayed out of the public eye, and temporarily hid out in a Hong Kong hotel room. “It’s as if the whole country has turned against me, turning black into white and white into black,” Wang told The New York Times at the time. “It’s truly beyond my comprehension.”

    It is unclear how the case will proceed.


    Wang Lin

    More on Wang Lin

    Even more on Wang Lin

    & an update
    Gene Ching
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    Wang Lin busted

    ...for murder!

    Qigong master to the stars arrested in China over disciple's murder
    Wang Lin had been involved in a series of disputes with Jiangxi legislator
    PUBLISHED : Thursday, 16 July, 2015, 10:27pm
    UPDATED : Thursday, 16 July, 2015, 10:29pm
    Li Jing jing.li@scmp.com


    Arrested: the qigong master Wang Lin. Photo: SCMP Pictures

    Wang Lin, the controversial qigong master who had many high-profile celebrity clients, was arrested on Thursday by Jiangxi police on suspicion of involvement in the kidnapping and murder of one of his "disciples".

    Police arrested two men, surnamed Liu and Zhu, on Tuesday evening, Xinhua News Agency reported. Police said the pair had admitted that they kidnapped and murdered the disciple, identified in media reports as Zou Yong, who went missing on July9.

    During their investigation, police had learnt that Wang and a fourth man identified as Huang Yugang were also involved, Xinhua reported, adding that the investigation was continuing.

    Reports said that the dead man was a businessman and provincial legislator in Jiangxi who had been close to Wang and had become one of his last disciples. But the two fell out in late 2012 amid commercial disputes.

    The Beijing News reported that the two had sued each other in four cases involving disputes over the ownership of several properties and luxury liquor.

    Wang had also reported Zou to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the top graft-buster, claiming that he was involved in bribery, news website Thepaper.cn reported.

    Wang's wife said her husband had been taken by police to "assist the investigation" into Zou's disappearance, Shenzhen Evening News reported.

    Wang had been accused of practising medicine illegally, but his name was cleared last week after a two-year investigation found no evidence to prove the allegation.

    In 2013, several celebrities had accused Wang of charging exorbitant fees for medical services and claimed he had no expertise.

    The health bureau in Luxi county had subsequently informed state media that he indeed lacked any formal qualifications. It said he had avoided the suspicion of the authorities by running his clinic inside his home in Pingxiang .

    Wang, who once claimed to be a billionaire, attracted a large number of followers and high-profile clients, often opening his five-floor villa and garden to visiting celebrities and journalists.

    Photos have circulated widely online of Wang posing with former Hong Kong chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, former Guangdong political advisory body chairman Zhu Mingguo , disgraced railways minister Liu Zhijun , actors Jackie Chan and Jet Li, and others.

    Since the accusations emerged, Wang has stayed out of the public eye, and temporarily hid out in a hotel in Hong Kong, where he acquired permanent residency nearly two decades ago.

    The Beijing News reported in 2013 that Wang had been jailed in 1979 for seven years for deception
    "Qigong Master" Wang Lin Detained by Police
    2015-07-16 21:17:38 CRIENGLISH.com Web Editor: Shi


    A file photo of self-proclaimed "Qigong Master" Wang Lin. [Photo: weixin.qq.com]

    Police in Pingxiang City in east China's Jiangxi Province have detained self-proclaimed "Qigong Master" Wang Lin for questioning in connection with a kidnapping and killing case.

    According to the Xinhua News Agency, the police also detained three other suspects in the case. Two of the suspects admitted kidnapping and killing the victim, Zou Yong, who was a former disciple of Wang Lin. The case is under further investigation.

    A photo widely circulated on the Internet shows a man purported to be Wang Lin being questioned in an interrogation room with a clock on the wall indicating it was Wednesday morning, July 15. The authenticity of the photo could not be independently verified.

    Wang Lin had reportedly been hiding in south China's Shenzhen before he was detained by the police.

    Zou Yong, a businessman who formally acknowledged Wang as his master, sued Wang over a housing contract dispute involving more than 30 million yuan, or approximately 4.8 million US dollars, in 2012.

    In 2013, a photo collection of Wang Lin with Chinese celebrities and government officials published by a Hong Kong publishing house raised eyebrows from the public. In the collection named "Chinese People", Wang claimed his special abilities to cure people using qigong, a traditional Chinese martial arts combined with meditation.

    Wang, a native of Luxi County in east China's Jiangxi, once told Beijing News that U.S. intelligence agencies offered him 70 green cards to try to persuade him to emigrate, but he turned them down because of his attachment to his hometown. He also claimed that he had cured as many as 50,000 patients.

    Many have questioned Wang's claims of medical cures and doubted whether he is cheating illed people for large sums of money.

    The Health Inspection Institute of Pingxiang launched an investigation into Wang's medical practices in 2013, but ended nowhere.

    Officials from the health department said that over the last two years, Luxi County authorities checked 198 clinics in 138 villages and 11 townships but could not find anyone who had been treated by Wang, nor did they find any evidence pertaining to Wang's alleged crimes.

    Wang Lin has also been probed over illegal medical practices, alleged gun ownership as well as fraud.
    Gene Ching
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    More on Wang Lin

    There's been a lot of news on Wang Lin's bust. This article has a nice overview of the impact of his arrest on the whole.

    A brutal murder exposes the close ties between China’s elite and their qigong mystics


    A qigong demonstration at a temple fair in Beijing. (Reuters/Jason Lee)

    Written by Zheping Huang
    Obsession
    China's Transition
    July 17, 2015

    A qigong mystic whose clients include some of China’s political and business elite was detained by police in southeastern Jiangxi province on July 16, after the brutal murder of one of his disciples.

    Wang Lin, a so-called “qigong master,” was detained by police with three other suspects after Zou Yong, a fuel company president and Communist Party official, was kidnapped and killed on July 9, state-run Xinhua reports. Zou had been dismembered and thrown into a local lake, the Beijing News (link in Chinese) reported, citing an anonymous source.

    Two of the suspects have admitted to kidnapping and killing Zou, Xinhua said. Wang, whose alleged powers include being able to conjure snakes out of thin air and cure cancer, is being questioned by the police.

    The case has focused attention on qigong, the Chinese martial art and spiritual practice that focuses on the “qi” or life-force. While it is considered outdated by younger people in China, it still followed closely by older politicians and the business elite. Wang’s followers have included former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin’s sister, president Hu Jintao’s sister, a former Chinese health minister, the head of China’s Supreme People’s Procuratorate, actor Jet Li, and Alibaba’s Jack Ma.


    Wang (center) with Jack Ma (left) and actress Zhao We.(Weibo)

    Before Zou’s death, he and Wang had a long, complex history.

    Zou, who was the Jiangxi province’s deputy to the National People’s Congress, China’s legislative body, paid 5 million yuan ($805,192) to be a disciple of Wang in 2009, according to Xinhua. Then things went sour, though. The two filed several lawsuits against each other over commercial disputes since 2013, Xinhua reported (link in Chinese).

    According to the Beijing News, after paying a hefty sum to become Wang’s disciple, and buying him a Rolls-Royce car worth 4.4 million yuan (about $700,000), Zou was not satisfied with what he learned from Wang. Then, they had a commercial dispute over two properties in Shenzhen and Hong Kong. In 2013, Zou told authorities Wang had illegal guns and an unlicensed medical practice. Local police and health authorities failed to convict Wang due to lack of evidence.

    According to state-run digital publication The Paper (link in Chinese), Wang promised in a letter dated January 11 2015 that he would pay a reward of 5 million yuan if Zou was arrested and sentenced to death. The publication included an alleged photo of the letter, which included Wang’s Hong Kong ID number, and fingerprint.


    Wang’s letter of commitment. (Weibo/ The Paper)

    How this connects to Zou’s brutal killing is unclear. Wang has a history of threatening his detractors. After media reports questioned him of faking supernatural powers to accumulate wealth in 2013, he reportedly (link in Chinese) told a commentator: “I can use qigong to poke you to death across dozens of meters.”

    The juxtaposition between Wang’s alleged powers and Zou’s brutal death is not sitting well with China’s netizens. “It’s not reasonable. The master can poke people to death across air, why did he bother to send someone to do this?,” one blogger wrote on Twitter-like Sina Weibo on July 17 after Wang’s detention. “So many leaders and big stars can also prove his magic. How dare the police challenge those big shots?”

    Zou once told Chinese media (link in Chinese) that Wang had promised disgraced railway minister Liu Zhijun he would set up a magic stone in his office, so he would never fall from power. Liu was sentenced to a suspended death sentence for taking bribes in 2013.

    “Some do believe in his power, some just play dumb in order to get into this circle of the rich and the powerful,” an anonymous person familiar with the Wang case told Xinhua.

    Being a Qigong master can be a lucrative profession in China, but it hasn’t been so lucky for clients recently. China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang’s qigong teacher Cao Yongzheng was known as the “Xinjiang Sage.” Zhou trusted Cao so much he leaked him “confidential” documents. Cao became an integral witness in the trial against Zhou, who was sentenced to life in prison this year.
    Gene Ching
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    Wang Lin detained

    Self-proclaimed Chinese qigong master arrested for illegal detention
    (Xinhua)
    Updated: 2015-08-21 09:23


    Aerial photo taken on July 18, 2015 shows Wang Lin's villa in Shenzhen.[Photo/IC]

    NANCHANG - Police in East China's Jiangxi province formally arrested self-proclaimed qigong master Wang Lin Thursday for his alleged role in an "illegal detention" case.

    The victim, a company president Zou Yong, was kidnapped on July 9 and murdered. Police detained four suspects, including Wang.

    Wang and another suspect were arrested on the charge of illegal detention, while the other two were charged with intentional homicide, according to the public security bureau of Pingxiang City.

    Wang, who claims to be a master of qigong, a traditional martial art combined with meditation, came to public attention in 2013 when images of his supposed "supernatural powers" were posted on the Internet. These "powers" include conjuring snakes from thin air and posing for pictures with celebrities.

    Zou was introduced to Wang in 2002. In a TV interview in 2013, Zou said he had paid 5 million yuan ($804,000) in 2009 to become a disciple of Wang, who asked for nearly 30 million yuan from him thereafter.

    Wang has been previously investigated for possession of a gun, unlicensed medical practice, bribery and fraud. Local police and health authorities launched an investigation in 2013 but failed to make any headway due to lack of evidence.

    Police are further investigating the latest case.

    Wang's background:

    Wang has been in the public spotlight recently because of the many published photos of him hobnobbing with celebrities. His claim of "supernatural powers" has raised doubts among the public.

    Wang had close relation-ships with many famous and powerful people, including actor Jackie Chan, Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma and several high-level officials. Photos of Wang posing with Chan and Ma spread widely on the Internet.

    Other celebrities such as actor Jet Li and actress Zhao Wei were also guests of Wang according to photos he has shown. Even top officials including Liu Zhijun, the dismissed minister of railway visited Wang and former health minister Chen Minzhang was shown receiving treatment by Wang.

    Wang claimed he has treated more than 50,000 patients. But the health bureau of Luxi county said Wang was not qualified in medicine and has no license.

    Wang is among the richest people in Luxi county and one of his villas covers more than 6,600 square meters with a man-made lake.

    Wang boasts the legend of his treatment in his book published in Hong Kong. One example is once he cured a master with liver cancer in Qianyan Temple in Shenyang, Liaoning province, but reporters claim they found there was no such temple in Shenyang and the master allegedly did not exist.

    There are some other similar cases. Wang reportedly cured a mail officer named Chen Zhaocai in Nanzuo town, Xingguo county, Jiangxi province according to the book. But it appears there is no Nanzuo town in the county.
    Wang Lin almost needs his own independent thread here. Maybe I'll split it off soon... we'll see how it goes.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #9
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    More on Wang Lin

    Journalist, Others Held Over Case of Chinese Spiritual Guide
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSOCT. 20, 2015, 1:39 A.M. E.D.T.

    BEIJING — A Chinese journalist and policeman have been detained over accusations of bribery and the leaking of documents relating to the case of a disgraced spiritual guide linked to celebrities and a fallen state minister, state media reports say.

    The case involving investigative reporter Liu Wei of the state-run Southern Metropolis Daily newspaper has drawn the concern of foreign journalists' advocates about the ability of reporters to do probing work in China. The U.S.-based Committee to Protect Journalists has protested the holding of Liu Wei, saying China is now "criminalizing basic reporting."

    The policeman, identified only by his surname, Zhong, is suspected of taking bribes in exchange for any help in dropping criminal charges against spiritual master Wang Lin, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. Zhong is suspected of accepting bribes from the ex-wife and a former mistress of Wang, who in turn are suspected of leaking secret documents that could help Wang's case, Xinhua said.

    Liu, who had been reporting extensively on Wang's case, was suspected of involvement with Zhong's illegal activities, Xinhua said, without further detailing the accusations against Liu.

    It wasn't immediately clear whether the two women were also being held, and law enforcement departments declined to comment on the case.

    Wang claims to have supernatural powers as a master of qigong, a traditional combination of meditation, martial arts and Chinese philosophy. He was arrested in August and charged with illegal detention in the kidnapping and grisly murder of a former acolyte.

    Citing a detention notice issued to Liu's family, the Committee to Protect Journalists said Liu has been accused of "illegally acquiring state secrets," an extremely vague charge that can result in a lengthy prison sentence.

    "The government's interpretation of state secrets has grown so broad that it now encompasses routine criminal justice matters," CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon said in a letter of protest. "Liu Wei must be released and all criminal allegations against him dropped immediately."

    Xinhua said Liu and Zhong's case was being handled directly by the Ministry of Public Security, in an apparent indication of the seriousness with which it was being regarded. Zhong had been an officer with the police force in the Jiangxi province city of Pingxiang.

    Xinhua said a "responsible person" from the Southern Metropolis Daily said the paper supported the investigation, had agreed to cooperate and "believes the law enforcement departments will investigate according to law and handle justly."

    However, an editor reached at the newspaper's office in the southern city of Guangzhou said no official statement on the case had ever been issued. The editor, who declined to give his name, said the paper was not accepting interviews on the matter.

    The case underscores the influence of spiritual masters in Chinese political and business life, a phenomenon sometimes blamed for encouraging corruption and abuse of office.

    Wang was propelled to fame by reports of his purported mastery of qigong. Wang claimed to be able to conjure up snakes from thin air and to be able to "poke" people remotely with his powers of concentration.

    He drew the wrong sort of attention from authorities after his former disciple Zou Yong was kidnapped and murdered on July 9. Zou had claimed he paid Wang 5 million yuan ($786,000) to become his disciple and that the two were involved in a web of lawsuits and disputes.

    Wang had previously been investigated for gun possession, practicing medicine without a license, bribery and fraud, but those investigations were stymied by a lack of evidence, Xinhua said.

    Wang once had the trust of former Chinese railways minister Liu Zhijun, who fell in a corruption scandal in 2013 even after Wang gifted him with a rock supposedly imbued with protective powers. Jack Ma, founder of Internet shopping giant Alibaba, and martial arts actor Jet Li also were fans of Wang.
    Maybe his qigong powers will save him?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  10. #10
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    Wang Lin is dead

    Controversial 'spiritual guru' who said he could conjure live snakes from thin air and cure terminal cancer dies of organ failure in hospital aged 65

    Wang Lin, a famous Qigong master has died in China at the age of 65
    Qigong is thought to generate energy and can help someone's health and spirit
    He died from complications from a serious autoimmune disorder
    Wang Lin was well connected to celebrities and businessmen in China

    By Sophie Williams For Mailonline
    PUBLISHED: 13:26 EST, 10 February 2017 | UPDATED: 14:48 EST, 10 February 2017

    A self-proclaimed Chinese spiritual guru who claimed he could cure terminal cancer and conjure snakes from thin air has died at the age of 65.

    Wang Lin died today in Fuzhou, China's Jiangxi province, from complications from a serious autoimmune disorder which led to multiple organ failure.

    He was detained in 2013 and charged with illegal detention, fraud, gun possession and bribery. However he was granted bail last month due to his poor physical condition.


    Wang Lin (holding the snake) claimed that he could conjure reptiles with bare hands


    Wang Lin (right) pictured with China's former Foreign Minister Qian Qichen (second to the left)


    Well connected: Wang Lin (middle) pictured during a hike in Pingxiang Scenic Area, China

    The Intermediate People's Court in Fuzhou said in a statement that Wang Lin had passed away.

    Wang practiced the ancient form of Qigong, which is thought to cultivate energy. While some claim it can heal the body, help others and also reconnect a person with their spiritual side.

    He also posted videos online of him conjuring live snakes out of an empty pot and filling an empty glass with wine by 'simply breathing on it.'

    Wang shot to prominence in 2013 after photographs of him posing with celebrities and businessmen emerged in Chinese media.

    He has been pictured with Alibaba owner and founder Jack Ma, Jackie Chan and Jet Li.


    Zhao Wei (right), a famous Chinese actress, and billionaire Jack Ma (left) pictured walking with Wang Lin (middle)


    Master: He has been pictured with Jack Ma (left) and Zhao Wei (right) many times in media

    Wang Lin (pictured wearing sunglasses) was detained in 2015 in connection with the death of a businessman
    Wang Lin (pictured wearing sunglasses) was detained in 2015 in connection with the death of a businessman

    Media also claimed that he profited from corrupt and superstitious officials, telling them that he could help advance their careers and would also connect them with powerful people.

    When the pictures emerged many people saw him as a symbol of corruption, using his connections to gain wealth.

    Wang was detained in 2015 along with three others in connection with the kidnapping and death of businessman Zou Yong. At the time it was reported that he paid Wang substantial sums of money to become a follower.

    The Fuzhou prosecutor found Wang 'criminally responsible' for illegal detention, fraud, gun possession and bribery in November last year.

    Last month he was granted bail as his physical condition worsened.

    The number of religious groups and sects have been multiplying in recent years as more people seek spiritual meaning.
    Wang Lin has many entries on this thread, so many that I considered making an indie thread for him.

    Wang Lin

    More on Wang Lin

    Even more on Wang Lin

    an update

    Wang Lin busted

    More on Wang Lin

    More on Wang Lin
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    a “vulgar magician”

    Wang Lin deserves his own indie thread from Busted Qigong Masters now that he has two whole documentary dedicated to him.

    Wang Li: Qigong “Master” a Conjurer of Cheap Tricks?
    The famous Chinese qigong practitioner has been accused of being a charlatan.
    By Jonathan DeHart
    July 31, 2013
    Two documentaries aired on China’s state-run CCTV on Sunday calling Wang Lin a “vulgar magician” who has done little more than sell bogus health techniques to the Chinese masses – not to mention some of its elite.

    The qigong (Taoist breathing exercises meant to cultivate energy) spiritualist and advisor has fallen on hard times since the investigative reports played on television sets across the nation and has since come under investigation for fraud. The Jiangxi province-born “master” is reportedly attempting to evade scrutiny by disappearing from sight – some say by fleeing to Hong Kong.

    Wang’s fall from grace has become a major topic of discussion in China, given his celebrity clientele, which included some of China’s most prominent entertainment, business luminaries – even heads of state – from Jackie Chan and Jet Li to Alibaba founder Jack Ma and Hong Kong’s former chief executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen, as well as relatives of former Chinese President Hu Jintao.

    The prominence of 61-year-old Wang’s following was not in doubt, although some of his practices were strange by any standards. From “creating snakes” after placing scraps of paper under an upside-down basin which he jostles around until two snakes issue forth (see video here) to shredding steel with his bare hands, recovering paper from ashes, and even retrieving “an incinerated banknote intact from an orange” – some of his exploits are truly bizarre.

    While actions such as these can be dismissed as magic tricks, things become morally hazy with some of his health suggestions. Wang has claimed to heal cancer and other serious illnesses, including removal of three “stones” from the body of former Indonesian president Suharto. All told, Wang estimates he has worked with some 50,000 patients.

    Wang has dismissed claims that his practices are illegal, claiming that he has undergone rigorous investigation by a team of 17 Japanese scientist over a period of seven days, and has received numerous offers from U.S. intelligence agencies attempting to lure him to their shores with the promise of a green card.

    He claims that he began to cultivate his supernatural powers from age seven under the tutelage of an Emei Taoist priest.

    Despite accusations that he is a charlatan, Wang claims he donates up to 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) annually to charity – a claim that is backed by Pan Zhongwu, deputy director of social assistance at Pingxiang’s Civil Affairs Bureau.

    Sima Nan, well known as a debunker of pseudoscience, invited Wang to Beijing to prove his claims, offering $1.6 million to anyone who can prove they have supernatural powers.

    Wang has not taken criticism or questioning lightly, cursing at least one journalist. “I am telling you, you will die miserably, and your family will follow," Wang told a reporter with The Beijing News last week after she wrote a story that he thought damaged his name.

    If convicted of illegal practice, he has a lot to lose. With the dubious earnings he has raked in, Wang has procured three Hummers and a Rolls-Royce that has been spotted parked in front of his five-story villa in his hometown of Pingxiang, Jiangxi province, nicknamed “the palace” due to the fact that his surname means “king” in Mandarin. He is also known to drive a Porsche and owns further properties in Shenzhen, Nanchang and Hong Kong.


    GUEST AUTHOR
    Jonathan DeHart
    Jonathan DeHart is a Tokyo-based journalist and correspondent for The Diplomat.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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