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Thread: Stop Asian Hate

  1. #16
    Dude I’m so glad I thought it would all delete but now we can preserve kung fu history for all time noice

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  2. #17
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    More SF action

    There's a newscast vid behind the link.
    San Francisco martial arts demonstration aims to take a stand against Asian hate
    By Greg Liggins Published 4 hours ago San Francisco

    A different kind of demonstration against Asian hate took place Sunday afternoon in downtown San Francisco. Over the last several weeks, there have been all kinds of rallies and marches denouncing Asian hate, but this event had a twist, and some punches, and kicks. Greg Liggins reports

    SAN FRANCISCO - A different kind of demonstration against Asian hate took place Sunday afternoon in downtown San Francisco.

    Over the last several weeks, there have been all kinds of rallies and marches denouncing Asian hate, but this event had a twist, and some punches, and kicks.

    Martial artists from nine different schools, representing various disciplines performed combat drills and gave demonstrations outside City Hall.

    Krav Maga, Wing Chung, Muy Thai, Jujitsu, Judo and MMA, were some of the disciplines on display.

    The Asia Strong event was the brainchild of Hudson Liao and friends after the group had a discussion about the deadly Atlanta area killings and local attacks on Asians.

    "Realizing how ****ed off we were about the situation and instead of talking about it we were convicted to do something," said Liao.

    Liao, a long-time student and self-described martial arts fanatic, came up with the idea of an event to help the community realize its collective strength, and empower people to learn to literally combat violence themselves.

    "A lot of things are happening. People are getting attacked. People don’t even want to go outside of their house. This hurts our community," said one speaker at the event.

    There were speakers from the podium meant to motivate and show compassion, but the demonstrations were there to show people there are resources to help learn to be less fearful and more confident if self-protection becomes necessary.

    One of the more than 200 attendees said she liked the idea of making such a variety of martial arts demos easily accessible to the public.

    "I think it lets everybody for like 30 seconds or one or two-minute demonstrations on like, is this good for them, if this is something they want to learn," said Cheyenne Fong.

    Martial artists say they feel confident knowing they can protect themselves and their loved ones if necessary.

    They’re hoping the demonstrations show others being physically empowered also leads to mental empowerment, something they say their community needs more of right now.

    "We want people to walk away from today just feeling empowered that they can do something," said Liao. "And that there is an abundance of resources if they want it."

    Since the increase in violence against Asians, Liao says more people have expressed an interest in learning some form of self-defense.

    Quote Originally Posted by rett2 View Post
    Over 100 guests on the website right now... all seeing ads for the martial arts gear store. That's low cost advertising with reach

    just guessing but seems like the reason
    Right you are, rett2. As long as all of you good people support MartialArtSmart.com, I can keep the lights on around here. Tell your friends.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    Steph & Bruce

    Steph Curry Wears Shoes Made With Bruce Lee Foundation in Solidarity with Asian Community
    BY GRACE KIM
    APRIL 5, 2021
    2 MINUTE READ



    Steph Curry recently wore shoes created with the Bruce Lee Foundation to stand in solidarity with the Asian community in Atlanta.

    On Sunday’s game against the Atlanta Hawks, Curry wore a special set of Curry 8s that were hand-painted yellow and black. These shoes featured an image of Bruce Lee as well as one of his famous quotes: “Under the heavens, there is but one family.”

    Nick DePaula
    @NickDePaula
    ·
    Apr 4
    Curry’s shoes feature a
    @BruceLee
    quote: “Under the heavens, there is but one family.”

    “We are all different & unique. On purpose. But, we are all human beings on a quest to fulfill our purpose and that energy should be used to uplift & love each other to the fullest,” he said.


    Stephen Curry and Bruce Lee
    Quote Tweet
    Nick DePaula
    @NickDePaula
    · Apr 4
    EXCLUSIVE: @StephenCurry30 plans to show solidarity with Asian community in Atlanta today with custom sneakers.

    In tandem with the @BruceLee Foundation, Curry will auction off his shoes to aid families of recent Atlanta shooting tragedy.
    The shoes will be auctioned off within the next few weeks, and the profits will be divided among the families of the victims of last month’s mass shooting in Atlanta that took the lives of eight people, six of whom were of Asian descent.

    The Golden State Warriors guard told The Undefeated that Curry was outraged by the tragedy and immediately wanted to help out.

    “Disgust, horror and outright anger at why any violence keeps happening in our country,” Curry said. “After all we have been through this past year, let alone in the history of our country, people still deal with unnecessary tragedy and are afraid for their lives. We have to do better.”

    Curry reached out to members of the Bruce Lee Foundation to find a way to support the victims’ families. He has been a lifelong fan of Lee and what he stood for, according to Yahoo Sports.

    “He lived what he spoke and meant every word,” Curry said when describing Lee. “He pushed himself to be greater than he knew he could and to impact people along the way.”

    Curry hoped that wearing the hand-painted Curry 8s would not only help out the victims’ families, but also remind everyone of Lee’s philosophies, NBC reported.

    “We have so many faithful Asian American fans that have supported me along this amazing journey,” Curry said. “We represent them on the court and I feel the love no matter where I go.”

    Shannon Lee — the president of the Bruce Lee Foundation and Lee’s only daughter — spoke to The Undefeated and referred to Curry’s gesture as a “beautiful example of allyship and solidarity in action.”

    “I am honored he would choose my father and my family as the symbol for the idea that we are all one family, as my father said, and therefore must all stand for one another,” she said.

    Feature Image via Getty
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    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    Sakura Kokumai

    There's a vid behind the link

    Woman Training for Olympics Becomes Target of Anti-Asian Rant at Orange County Park
    Sakura Kokumai, 28, is the first American to qualify for the Olympics in karate, and is training for the summer games in Tokyo.
    By Angie Crouch • Published 3 hours ago • Updated 3 hours ago

    An Olympic hopeful from SoCal — the first American to qualify for the Olympics in karate — posted a video of the man shouting at her as she trained in a park. Angie Crouch reports April 8, 2021.

    An Asian American woman training for the Olympics' karate competition says she was threatened by a man yelling racial slurs at an Orange County Park, and is sharing the recorded video of the incident in order to spread awareness about growing harassment against Asian Americans.

    Sakura Kokumai, 28, is the first American to qualify for the Olympics in karate, and is training for the summer games in Tokyo.

    She said she’s still in shock over what happened at Grijalva Park in the city of Orange last week.

    “Nobody likes to be yelled at by a complete stranger," she said.

    In a video she shared on Instagram, you can see a stranger berating her and threatening her as she worked out.

    "Go home, stupid," can be heard. “I’ll (bleep) you up - I’ll (bleep) your husband up or boyfriend or whoever you’re talking to on the phone."

    She responds with, "I haven’t done anything.”

    "When somebody is just yelling at you that aggressively you do get your guard up a little bit - you do get worried," Kokumai said.

    Kokumai is Japanese American, but she says the man yelled something about her being Chinese as he drove away.

    "The only two words I picked up were 'Chinese' and 'sashimi' which have no connection at all," she said.

    In an online summit with other Olympic athletes, U.S. gymnast Yul Moldauer revealed he too has been the victim of racial harassment.

    “Last month I was driving and a lady cut me off. She yelled at me, 'go back to China.' For me my job is to represent this country so I take a lot of pride into it," Moldauer said.

    The man in the Instagram video has not been identified and Kokumai wasn’t hurt.

    She says while it’s heartbreaking to see a rise in attacks on Asian Americans, she hopes sharing her story will bring awareness.

    “We all belong here and we don’t have to be afraid when we go out. But I encourage people to look out for one another," she said.
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  5. #20
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    Michael Vivona busted for elder abuse

    More on Sakura Kokumai

    Police Arrest Man Accused of Berating Team USA Karate Athlete Training at Park for Olympics
    Sakura Kokumai, who qualified for this summer’s Olympics in karate, was training at an Orange County park when a stranger began yelling at her and making threats.
    By Staff Reports • Published April 19, 2021 • Updated 6 hours ago


    An Olympic hopeful from SoCal — the first American to qualify for the Olympics in karate — posted a video of the man shouting at her as she trained in a park. Angie Crouch reports April 8, 2021.

    A man accused of assaulting a Southern California Asian couple and threatening a U.S. Olympian who was training at an Orange County park has been arrested.

    Michael Vivona, 25, of Corona was arrested Sunday on suspicion of elder abuse and committing a hate crime in connection with an assault on a Korean American couple. He also was arrested in the April 1 encounter with 28-year-old Sakura Kokumai, who qualified for this summer’s Olympics in karate.

    Details about the arrest were not immediately available. It was not immediately clear whether the suspect has an attorney.

    Kokumai, a seven-time national champion, shared video of the encounter with a man who yelled at her in Grijalva Park in the city of Orange. In video shared on Instagram, the man can be seen berating her as she works out at the public park.

    It makes me emotional just to think about it because at the time I did feel that I was alone.

    Sakura Kokumai
    “Go home stupid,” the man can be heard saying. “I’ll f— you up. I’ll f— your husband up or boyfriend or whoever you’re talking to on the phone.”

    Kokumai is Japanese American, but she said the man yelled something about her being Chinese as he drove away.

    “The only two words I picked up were ‘Chinese’ and ’sashimi,’ which have no connection at all,” Kokumai told NBCLA. “Nobody likes to be yelled at by a complete stranger.”

    Kokumai was at the park to go for a jog as she prepares to represent the United States in front of the world at the Olympics in Tokyo.

    Kokumai said she shared the video to spread awareness about harassment against Asian Americans.

    “I want everybody to know, especially in the AAPI community, that you’re not alone,” Kokumai told NBC News. “I think it’s really important to have compassion, share love and look out for one another.

    “It makes me emotional just to think about it because at the time I did feel that I was alone."

    In the aftermath, Kokumai said she received heartwarming messages of support.

    “They made me feel that I do belong here,” Kokumai said.

    Details about the other crime for which the suspect was arrested were not immediately available.
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  6. #21
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    Bamboo ceiling

    A-pop! White people are ruining ‘bamboo ceiling’ for us!
    MARCH 25, 2021 BY NORTHWEST ASIAN WEEKLY

    By Stacy Nguyen
    Northwest Asian Weekly

    I know we’ve all had a really terrible week, and it feels a bit discordant to read frivolous pop culture news. But I hope this column gives you a break from the heaviness.

    White people get ****ed about term “bamboo ceiling,” which sounds like something they’d do



    Asian reporter Rebecca Sun wrote a headline in the Hollywood Reporter that said “Diverse Oscars field sees Asian actors shatter the bamboo ceiling” and a whole lotta white people got really uppity about it because they didn’t realize that bamboo ceiling is legit a term coined by author (and Asian person) Jane Hyun, who used the term to describe how hard it is for Asian Americans to get into leadership positions in big companies.

    Instead, these woke white people who don’t know that much about Asian stuff and aren’t great at checking bylines were like, “Bamboo ceiling! Oh, because they are Asian? How dare you! Racist!”

    To her credit, Sun responded in a super chill and super classy way. She tweeted, “Hi! I wrote that headline (and the story). My editor, who is not Asian, was worried about it, but it’s a conscious choice I made to reference the phrase’s usage in the corporate world (the difficulty Asian executives have in breaking through to upper management).”

    Anyway, the Hollywood Reporter has since changed that headline to something white people won’t get mad about on behalf of people of color because we must always, always, always center white ignorance and white comfort and do workarounds for white #fakefacts.
    'Bamboo ceiling' and 'Bamboo curtain' are longstanding terms.

    threads
    Bamboo
    Copying this to Stop-Asian-Hate too, just because it's related.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #22
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    Another slightly OT post

    ...but this one is happening in Fremont, which is where Tiger Claw HQ is.

    Buddhist Temple Takes on Fremont Over Unpermitted Buildings
    By Marianne Favro • Published May 11, 2021 • Updated on May 11, 2021 at 6:40 pm

    The co-founder of a Buddhist temple in the Fremont hills is now threatening to sue the city for religious, gender and racial discrimination. She claims the city is unfairly forcing her to demolish much of her private religious facility. Marianne Favro reports.

    The co-founder of a Buddhist temple in the Fremont hills is now threatening to sue the city for religious, gender and racial discrimination. She claims the city is unfairly forcing her to demolish much of her private religious facility.

    Fremont said the temple's co-founder has been building on her property for years without proper permits.

    "Why are they doing that to me? It's because I am Asian, a religious woman and they don't want a temple here," said Miaolan Lee, temple co-founder.

    Lee owns 29 acres off Mill Creek Road in the Fremont foothills where she co-founded the private Temple of 1001 Buddhas. Her attorney said the city now wants her to demolish her main temple hall - a Hindu God house - and four other structures.

    The city said the requests are due to Lee building without needed permits for years.

    "After an investigation that lasted several months and included multiple inspections with other government agencies, including the state water board and Alameda County Environmental Health, the city determined multiple buildings had been constructed without building permits and in violation of city zoning regulations," the City of Fremont said in a statement.

    Lee's legal team, however, claim their client repeatedly tried to get permits.

    "Our client began permitting in 2011-2014 and has been trying to get permits ever since," said Tal Finney, Lee's attorney. "And the city has been obstructionist about granting permits."

    Attorney Angela Alioto said she has taken the first steps to file a federal civil rights lawsuits against Fremont "because she is an Asian, who is a religious woman building a temple to Buddha -- she is being discriminated against."

    City officials will hold a hearing on May 18 to discuss whether to move forward with the order to demolish the structures.
    Note that I've never been to Temple of 1001 Buddhas. I didn't even know it existed until this. There's a lot in the Fremont foothills that I never explored. I was closer to the Bay side of the city.

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  8. #23
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    1 in 4

    Likely an artifact of the 'model minority' myth.

    About 1 in 4 White People Don’t See Anti-Asian Racism as a Problem, Survey Finds

    BY CARL SAMSON
    MAY 11, 2021
    2 MINUTE READ

    Featured Image (Representation Only) via Jason Leung on Unsplash

    Nearly a quarter of white people do not see racism against Asian people as a problem to be fixed, a new poll has found.

    Nonprofit Leading Asian Americans to Unite for Change (LAAUNCH) published the finding in its first STAATUS (Social Tracking of Asian Americans in the U.S.) Index, which shows national attitudes toward Asian Americans.

    Key findings: STAATUS, among the first of its kind in 20 years, surveyed a total of 2,766 U.S. adults between March 29 and April 14.

    Eight out of 10 Asian Americans reported feeling discriminated against, according to the poll. Specifically, 77% of the group do not feel respected — slightly lower than African Americans (86%), on par with Hispanic Americans (77%), but above white Americans (31%).
    Despite global coverage, 37% of white Americans said they were not aware of the increase in anti-Asian incidents in the past year. Furthermore, 24% of the group do not believe that anti-Asian racism is a problem to be addressed.
    The survey found that the model minority myth persists, with adjectives such as “smart,” “intelligent” and “hard-working” still being used to describe Asian Americans. However, respondents are most comfortable to have Asian Americans as doctors, nurses, friends or co-workers, but less comfortable to have them as bosses or as president of the country.
    Twenty-six percent of Republicans, 6% of Democrats and 24% of people above 65 believe “China Virus” is an appropriate term for COVID-19. Twenty percent of all respondents also believe Asian Americans are more loyal to their home countries than to the U.S.

    Why this matters: The poll reinforces the fact that some still fail to see Asian people as a marginalized group in American society.

    LAAUNCH is working with partner organizations such as the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), Gold House and others to evaluate data, raise awareness, promote solidarity and develop programs that tackle bias against Asian Americans.
    “Inspired by the ADL’s research, we developed the STAATUS Index in collaboration with academics from University of Massachusetts, Boston; University of California, Los Angeles; and Princeton University to not only understand the root causes of racism and violence towards Asian Americans, but also to help shape American attitudes toward our community moving forward,” said Norman Chen, co-founder and chief executive officer of LAAUNCH.
    LAAUNCH plans to release the survey annually to track changes in perception and inform new programs that address underlying causes of racism.
    The nonprofit calls for more education on Asian American history, increased Asian American representation and a greater understanding of the impact of systemic racism.
    Dominic Ng, chairman and CEO of East West Bank, whose Foundation provided a grant for the survey, said that while the findings were unsurprising, getting them matters.

    “What’s important is that now we have data. That is crucial to create greater awareness, educate stakeholders and inform policymaking moving forward,” Ng said.

    Featured Image (Representation Only) via Jason Leung on Unsplash
    Gene Ching
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