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Thread: Calligraphy

  1. #16
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    Greetings..

    The study of calligraphy is a great introduction to the language.. it is a superior meditation, an expression of spirit.. Jianye Jiang is a master calligrapher and i have studied his technique, it is beautiful.. his brushwork is a whole body expression, his strokes begin in his feet from a medium height horse-stance and flow through his body onto the paper.. the technique is closely aligned with good CMA principles..

    I also play/study the traditional Japanese Shakuhachi, a 5 hole bamboo flute.. it is a great breath meditation and vibrational therapy.. oh, and the flute is a formidable weapon, too.. this is all consistent with a holistic approach to CMA, it is a balanced expression of energies..

    Be well..
    TaiChiBob.. "the teacher that is not also a student is neither"

  2. #17

    calligraphy

    I think it is due to the difference between the western culture and the eastern culture. And the language is a great obstable in understanding the beauty of Chinese calligraphy.

  3. #18
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    We have a calligraphy section in the back of our magazine

    It's our 'wisdom' page, since it's usually a martial chengyu. We've been doing this since 2004.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #19
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    Calligraphy & Kung Fu? A Cultural Treasure

    In truth, I feel that the majority of Chinese Martial Art Schools, especially in the UK, generally do not teach from authentic writings. We have westernized the information to the extent of having no consideration for older curriculums and language, and with all the variants in translation the original meanings tend to be lost or confused. Cultural Treasures need not only be found in religious, historical or political texts, IMHO they should exist in every School of Chinese Martial Arts as they did originally.

    Practising Calligraphy for the Martial Artist is also a very heavy burden. Drawing characters that you have a 'physical' attachment to is extremely tiring and has caused me personally to re-assess the true meaning of certain words in the style I practice.

    My Sifu was a great influence on me, and encouraged us all to learn how to read or recognize characters. But ultimately the responsibility of pursuing Calligraphy was left to the individual. I've always considered myself an Artist before a Martial Artist as drawing was my first passion. Maybe it is something I will pursue more in old-age...

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by roc View Post
    I think it is due to the difference between the western culture and the eastern culture. And the language is a great obstable in understanding the beauty of Chinese calligraphy.
    In Chinese culture, the written language is the one universal aspect that unites the different regions. With all the distinct dialects, the separation of north and south, anyone who can write definitely has a leg up no matter what part of the country they are in.

    When learning the language, the importance of writing is just as important as learning how to speak. True immersion.
    Cordially yours,
    冠木侍 (KS)
    _____________________________________________


    "Jiu mo gwai gwaai faai dei zau" (妖魔鬼怪快哋走) -- The venerable Uncle Chan

    "A fool with a sword is more dangerous than any weapon..."

    “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”--John Quincy Adams

    "If you have an unconquerable calmness, you can overcome the enemy without force" -Bushi Matsumura

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneTiger108 View Post
    In truth, I feel that the majority of Chinese Martial Art Schools, especially in the UK, generally do not teach from authentic writings. We have westernized the information to the extent of having no consideration for older curriculums and language, and with all the variants in translation the original meanings tend to be lost or confused. Cultural Treasures need not only be found in religious, historical or political texts, IMHO they should exist in every School of Chinese Martial Arts as they did originally.

    Practising Calligraphy for the Martial Artist is also a very heavy burden. Drawing characters that you have a 'physical' attachment to is extremely tiring and has caused me personally to re-assess the true meaning of certain words in the style I practice.

    My Sifu was a great influence on me, and encouraged us all to learn how to read or recognize characters. But ultimately the responsibility of pursuing Calligraphy was left to the individual. I've always considered myself an Artist before a Martial Artist as drawing was my first passion. Maybe it is something I will pursue more in old-age...
    Most contemporary Americans don't really care about calligraphy. They only learn Kung Fu for it's fighting principles, its external values. The physical aspect of Martial Arts is only a part of the whole equation.

    It is refreshing to know that value is still placed on such things. Gives me hope for the future of martial arts.
    Cordially yours,
    冠木侍 (KS)
    _____________________________________________


    "Jiu mo gwai gwaai faai dei zau" (妖魔鬼怪快哋走) -- The venerable Uncle Chan

    "A fool with a sword is more dangerous than any weapon..."

    “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”--John Quincy Adams

    "If you have an unconquerable calmness, you can overcome the enemy without force" -Bushi Matsumura

  7. #22
    While there is less exposure to the Traditional relations between the martial Arts and the other Cultural Arts (Calligraphy, Music, Poetry, etc) I find this to be the case also in China as well.

    yes language is the barrier. So only those interested in pursuing the Cultural Arts will do so.

    there is definetly a connection between the writings and the advancement in understanding ones style.

    One major problem is in how Mainland China has switched to the "Simplified Method" as well as using genrealized terms instead of the poetic verses found in the older manuals.

    Its a shame all around. China is so focused on the modernization at this point that alot of things are being lost. this is also evident in the new teachers coming from China who do not have a deep understanding of their arts and so the western student who wants to learn these suffer.

    eric

  8. #23
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    Even scientists should read Chinese...

    At the very least, don't use Chinese calligraphy indiscriminately.
    Chinese 'classical poem' was brothel ad
    Science journal mistakenly uses flyer for Macau brothel to illustrate report on China
    By Clifford Coonan in Beijing
    Tuesday, 9 December 2008

    A respected research institute wanted Chinese classical texts to adorn its journal, something beautiful and elegant, to illustrate a special report on China. Instead, it got a racy flyer extolling the lusty details of stripping housewives in a brothel.

    Chinese characters look dramatic and beautiful, and have a powerful visual impact, but make sure you get the meaning of the characters straight before jumping right in.

    There were red faces on the editorial board of one of Germany's top scientific institutions, the Max Planck Institute, after it ran the text of a handbill for a Macau strip club on the front page of its latest journal. Editors had hoped to find an elegant Chinese poem to grace the cover of a special issue, focusing on China, of the MaxPlanckForschung journal, but instead of poetry they ran a text effectively proclaiming "Hot Housewives in action!" on the front of the third-quarter edition. Their "enchanting and coquettish performance" was highly recommended.

    The use of traditional Chinese characters and references to "the northern mainland" seem to indicate the text comes from Hong Kong or Macau, and it promises burlesque acts by pretty-as-jade housewives with hot bodies for the daytime visitor.

    The Max Planck Institute was quick to acknowledge its error explaining that it had consulted a German sinologist prior to publication of the text. "To our sincere regret ... it has now emerged that the text contains deeper levels of meaning, which are not immediately accessible to a non-native speaker," the institute said in an apology. "By publishing this text we did in no way intend to cause any offence or embarrassment to our Chinese readers. "

    But publication of the journal caused some anger among touchier internet users in China who felt the institute had done it on purpose to insult China, or that it was disrespectful to use Chinse as a decoration. But generally, the faux-pas sparked much amusement among Chinese readers.

    On anti-cnn.com, a foreigner-baiting website set up after a commentator on the US broadcaster made anti-Chinese comments following the crackdown in Tibet in March, the reaction was mostly "evil fun". One wrote, "Next time, please find a smart Chinese graduate to check your translation", and another said they should try writing "I am illiterate".

    The journal has since been updated online and its cover now carries the title of a book by the Swiss Jesuit, Johannes Schreck (1576–1630). The Jesuit text in question was "Illustrated Explanations of Strange Devices".

    Chinese is a tonal language, which means words sounding the same can often have very different meanings depending on how they are spoken.

    There are tales of drunken teenagers walking out of tattoo parlours with characters reading, "This is one ugly foreigner" or "A fool and his money are easily parted".

    Another web-user wrote: "I recently met a German girl with a Chinese tattoo on her neck which in Chinese means 'prostitute'. I laughed so loud, I could hardly breathe."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #24
    Saw a TV show which showed numerous Asian Character TAttoos that were used incorrectly and simply meant something else.

    buyer beware.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Xia View Post
    It's pretty rare. The average person wouldn't be interested in Chinese calligraphy. The closest thing is the popularity of using Chinese characters for tattoos. However, I've heard a lot of stories about people that wind up getting tattoos that say things they wouldn't want written on themselves.

    And welcome to the boards roc.
    I saw a woman with the word "pig" on a tattoo.
    Simon McNeil
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    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimonM View Post
    I saw a woman with the word "pig" on a tattoo.
    but was it her birth sign, or is she just stupid?
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  12. #27
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    My new ezine essay

    This year, I was focused on finishing my book, Shaolin Trips, so I haven't been writing many essays. Here's a new essay that's been kicking around in my head for a while. I finally got it down on paper...um, on the web, I mean. Enjoy!

    How Chinese Calligraphy Can Improve Your Kung Fu by me.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
    Dear ROC,
    It is interesting you mention this. It has not been my experience in Taiwan that leading martial arts teachers have any great interest or skill in calligraphy. (Before anyone cites Ching Man Ching----he was a long time ago and very much an exception).

    Could you tell us more about some of the teachers there in south coastal China who are famous martial arts teachers and well known for their calligraphy?

    take care,
    Brian

  14. #29
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    I'm surprised to hear you say that, Brian

    The walls of our outer office are adorned with calligraphy from various renowned martial arts masters. We have even more pieces in storage - pieces that we haven't mounted yet (it's expensive to mount them and we're running out of wall space).

    Here's a list of martial calligraphers that have appeared in our magazine to date. We've been running calligraphy on our last page since 2004. These are in order and I have omitted the repeat contributions.

    Tu Jin-sheng
    Li Yancai
    Chen Xiaowang
    Jiang Jianye
    Chen Zhenlei
    Shi Deyang
    Yu Hai
    Yu Chenghui
    Qian Yuanze
    Shi Dechao
    He Fusheng
    Jackie Chan
    Shi Deci
    Sun Lei
    Zhao Ziqiu
    Me Fei
    Fu Biao
    Chen Qingzhou
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #30
    Hi Gene,
    That is true, thanks much.

    take care,
    Brian

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