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Thread: The Modern Southern Shaolin Temple

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Semillas View Post
    There are five lines or main branches of Shaolin, recognized by some and rejected by many. What is it known about the Monastery of Fujian whose remains found some decades ago and were they reconstructing?
    Those who recognize it fail to defer to the main temple proper and therefore perpetuate an untruth.

    There is 1 Shaolin Temple. That is the one at Songshan.

    The remains of the temple found in Fujian were not set as Shaolin. It was a buddhist temple that got destroyed during the 300 years of Qing reign.

    The qing destroyed literally hundreds and hundreds of temples that they felt might have too much wealth power or influence.

    You see, Mahayana buddhism was strong in China. It promised that anyone could achieve Nirvana through continued acts of merit. So people gave great amounts of money and stuffs to buddhist temples to get that merit and subsequently, the buddhist monasteries and temples were soon rivaling the government of the day itself.

    And so, temples were rubbed out, their wealth taken and the monks spread out or killed. Turbulent times.

    When it comes to history, there are better sources than tall stories from the kwoon.
    Last edited by David Jamieson; 07-26-2012 at 05:44 PM.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  2. #77
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    hi,

    I hope I'm not too late with this reply..

    There IS a Southern Shaolin Temple!

    It is located in QuanZhou, its about 45 min bus ride from XiaMen the nearest international airport. I've been to QunZhou about 4 time over the last 7 years, to attend the Southern Shaolin International Conference. Its a yearly event, with about 30-50 different schools/groups participatine from all over the world, mainly from Asia, with Europe and America represented, with styles like 5-Ancestors, White Crane, TaiZu (these are predominantly Fujian styles) and Wing Chun, Southern Mantis, ErMei present as well.

    Over the years, since 2005, the temple has been undergoing restoration, and completed around 2010, when it was offically opened. Its also has a youngish Abbot (my guess, 30'ish) who is trained in Bhuddism and Martial Arts. (I saw him perform a very credible Luohan form) in 2011 (my last visit), and since then has a live-in retinue to trainee monks.

    The dominant style in Quanzhou (and probably in the temple) is 5-Ancestors with TaiZu as a close second. The various White Crane styles would be more towards the east, in towns/cities like FuZhou, YongChun.

    The problem is, I don't think the temple has a program to take in foreign students, like the Henan Temple. At least not when I was last there in Nov 2011.

    As for whether its recognised by SongSan Northern Shaolin Temple, I think it is, as it has the full support of the provincial Fujian government which footed the bill for the restoration and is promoting it.

    As for its authencity, those in our 5-Ancestors lineage (Chee Kim Thong) believe storngly so, as our grand master's master trained there directly. And apparently at that time, it was a shadow of it former self. That's part of our oral history anyway. And I would think the other 5-Ancestor lineage (the Kong Han guys.) would also support its authencity.

    I also think that the reason why its hard to get contact and info about training there, is the temple is trying to get its own processes/administration sorted out first. And recruiting foreign trainees is probably not of high priority, now. From what I see, they are certainly a lot less 'commercial' than its brethren in the north ;-)

    However, if you are keen to learn 5-Ancestors, there are other options, one of which is to visit us here in Malaysia ;-)

  3. #78
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    People's Daily photo essay

    9 photos total if you follow the link.
    Southern Shaolin culture in Quanzhou


    (People's Daily Online) 08:41, May 27, 2014(Photo/Wang Dongming)
    Quanzhou is the birth place of Southern Shaolin martial art. Started from Jin and Tang Dynasties, and thrived in Song Dynasty, the Southern Shaolin martial art has been spread worldwide. The Quan Zhou Shaolin Temple as the carrier of Southern Shaolin martial art combines the traditional customs of Quanzhou and also the humanity essence of people of Quanzhou. It spreads with the development of the Maritime Silk Road and becomes an emotional bond between the Quanzhou people overseas and those at home.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #79
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    Our latest ezine article

    This is part 1 of a three part series: Three Shaolin Monasteries in Fujian Province: The Jewels of Southern Shaolin: Quanzhou by Gregory Brundage
    Gene Ching
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  5. #80
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    Part 2

    This is part 2 of a three part series: Three Shaolin Monasteries in Fujian Province: The Jewels of Southern Shaolin Part 2: Putian by Gregory Brundage
    Gene Ching
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  6. #81
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    My Sifu was in Fujian province the last two weeks visiting his village and relatives. He is now in Vietnam for two weeks visiting the cck tcpm schools there. Will have to ask him if he's been to any of the temples there.
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  7. #82
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    The final chapter

    Gene Ching
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  8. #83
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    a photo essay

    Pretty pix...

    Monks practice martial art at Quanzhou Shaolin Temple(1/8)
    2015-05-18 08:33 Xinhua Editor:Li Yan


    A monk meditates on a rooftop at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 13, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    Monks practice martial art on a rooftop at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 15, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    Photo taken on May 13, 2015 shows a bell tower at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    Monks attend a ceremony at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 16, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    A monk reads texts at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 14, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    Monks practice martial art at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 13, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    A monk practices martial art at the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple in Quanzhou City, southeast China's Fujian Province, May 15, 2015. Located in the east of the Qingyuan Mountain of Quanzhou, the Quanzhou Shaolin Temple, also called the South Shaolin Temple, is the birthplace of the South Shaolin martial art, which has spread to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao and even Southeast Asia since Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. It's also jointly called "the South and North Shaolin" with Songshan Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. Zen, the doctrine which every monk learning the Shaolin martial art should observe, refers to a frame of mind which gets rid of greed, anger and confusion and helps oneself reach inner peace as to become more powerful and invincible. (Photo: Xinhua/Wei Peiquan)


    Gene Ching
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  9. #84
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    Awesome photos! Great to see one of the existing temples of Fujian Province that was present during the development of numerous Southern styles based on Shaolin TCMA.

  10. #85
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    ttt 4 2017!

    Interesting articles. Someone needs to tell ECNS.CN that Abbot only has one T

    Southern Shaolin's kung fu monks battle for attention
    1 2017-12-27 16:31CGTNEditor: Gu Liping ECNS

    *You've probably heard of Shaolin Temple, but did you know there's more than one in China?

    In Quanzhou, in southeastern Fujian Province, monks in saffron-colored robes practice kung fu moves in front of a few dozen tourists every day.

    For Abbott Shi Changding, more needs to be done to attract people and get the word out about his temple.

    For many, the name Shaolin Temple immediately conjures up images of monks performing flying kicks and acrobatic tricks, as portrayed in countless movies. The temple most people know about is located in Henan Province in central China.

    The origins of the Quanzhou version are more mysterious. Officially, it was established during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD). Legend has it that monks from the northern Shaolin Temple came south to help fight pirates. Others say they fled the north at the fall of the Ming Dynasty in the 17th century.

    At one point, there were said to be several Shaolin temples in China.

    In any case, Southern Shaolin Temple was destroyed by fire in the late 18th century. It was not rebuilt until 1997 and now labels itself as the "birthplace of Southern Shaolin martial arts."

    Monks vs. pirates

    Unlike other types of martial arts that are heavy on kicks and leg work, Southern Shaolin focuses much more on punches and arm movements.

    This goes back to the Southern Shaolin monks' history of fighting pirates. On unstable terrain, such as at sea or in mountainous areas, it was easier to battle opponents with feet firmly planted on the ground, rather than try to perform elaborate jumps and flying kicks.

    The weapons used are based on similar thinking: a two-meter-long wooden staff could be used to strike opponents at a distance, such as from one boat to another.

    The "pa" – a sort of curved trident with metal rings – and handball-sized "double hammers" that rattle could not only harm an opponent, but also ward off wild animals in the mountains by making noise.

    Nowadays, Southern Shaolin martial arts are no longer used to fight off pirates, but the craft has spread far and wide, and can now be found in southeast China's island region of Taiwan, and southeast Asia and even the US.

    PR and kung fu

    At the temple in Quanzhou, pupils as young as six years old practice for up to six hours per day every day to master the skills to become a proper kung fu master.

    But the learning actually never ends, says Shi Ligang, head of the wushu team at the temple.

    Even Abbott Shi Changding still practices two to three hours a day.

    A kung fu practitioner since the age of 13, he has been with Southern Shaolin Temple since it was rebuilt. He says his mission is to help the temple gain recognition.

    This has meant attending conferences, giving media interviews and generally doing public relations work for the temple.

    "As the abbot of the temple, part of my job is to make more people know about Shaolin," he told CGTN on a recent visit.

    In the process however, he has attracted criticism from some who argue a monk's duty is at the temple, studying scripture.

    "When I take part in discussions and meetings all over the country, people ask: why isn't this Buddhist monk at the temple chanting prayers? How come he's here taking part in these activities?"

    But Shi Changding insists: "I have to, otherwise no one will know who we are and what we're doing.

    "We can't separate Buddhism from society and from life. If you want to carry it out to the community and to the world, you have to leave (the temple)."

    A pop culture boost

    One thing that has helped is kung fu movies, starting with Chang Hsin Yen's 1982 film "The Shaolin Temple," starring Li Lianjie, or Jet Li as he is better known in the West.

    "The Shaolin Temple movies in the 1980s, when they came out, were hugely popular, causing kung fu fever around the world. They contributed hugely to making more people familiar with Shaolin," according to Shi Changding.

    Nowadays, aspiring kung fu masters come from as far as Canada or Belgium to learn Southern Shaolin martial arts at the temple. Anyone can study kung fu at the temple as there is no prerequisite to be a monk.

    At the same time, Southern Shaolin is a Buddhist temple like any other in China: amid the Bodhi trees and imposing statues, monks study the teachings of Buddha and ordinary people go to pray and burn incense.

    The temple is still undergoing renovation and expansion work but once completed, it is expected to become one of the largest temples in China, covering some 400 "mu" (26.7 hectares).

    Still, on cool mornings when the only sound on the hill is that of dozens of monks moving in unison and punching the air, it is easy to feel transported to the time when warrior monks battled pirates.

    Chongqing Shaolin Temple in pictures (1/4)
    2017-12-27 10:48Ecns.cn Editor:Yao Lan





    Monks conduct their daily practice at a Shaolin Temple in the southwest Chinese municipality of Chongqing on December 14, 2017. Monks have been living in the Chongqing Temple for close to two years. Built at a cost of some 300 million yuan, the Shaolin Temple in Chongqing is the fourth Shaolin Temple in China behind ones in Quanzhou in Fujian, Tianjin, and the original in Henan Province. (Photo/VCG)
    Gene Ching
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  11. #86
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    There's a flag waving vid behind the link.

    4th July
    International Eisteddfod: Southern Temple Shaolin Monks make British debut with intense performance

    By Arron Evans

    ONE of the most eye-catching performances on day four of the Llangollen International Eisteddfod came from a team of monks who had travelled all the way from China to perform.

    The Southern Shaolin Temple Warrior Monks, first formed 15 years ago, had been performing all over South East Asia over the last year before appearing in North Wales on Thursday.

    The performance group train six hours a day, six days a week at the monastery in Putian, China and had previously visited Llangollen back in March.


    The Southern Temple Shaolin Monks at the International Eisteddfod

    They say they were inspired to return to the Town thanks to the “peacefulness and beauty” of Wales and the “warmth of the people”.

    During a high-energy performance at the Eisteddfod on Thursday, the monks showcased their kung fu mastery.

    The group, whose members are as young as nine years old, performed routines with swords and whips and even broke a piece of iron in half.

    Kung Fu Master Pol Wong, who teaches classes in Wrexham and is the go-between between the Shaolin Monks and Europe, said: "This is the first time in the Temple's 1500 year history that this group have performed in Britain.

    "They've really enjoyed being here and everyone else seemed to enjoy watching them as well which is great."

    After a dazzling performance in front of a large crowd out on the grounds, the monks took to the globe before performing alongside other international acts at "The Gathering" headliner.

    On Sunday, the Monks will be performing once more at the William Aston Hall in Wrexham for 7pm before heading back to China next week.

    Made famous by the 2000 film ‘Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon’, the Shaolin style of kung fu dates back 1,500 years and brings with it the traditions, power and majesty of 32 dynasties of kung fu fighting.

    Shaolin fighting monks hold the reputation throughout China as highly honourable, courageous and greatly skilled. Their model of fighting serves today as virtuous and spiritual representation of the Great Spirit present in each living being.
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