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Thread: back and posterior deltoid

  1. #1
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    back and posterior deltoid

    Kinda cool havin you ppls for help.

    What are some exercises you folks use for the back of the delts and back? all back

    For functionality, but hey looks not bad either



    Thanks,
    Shane

  2. #2
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    Back: Pullups are king for the lats. Do palms away from you, hands a bit wider than shoulder width. Deadlifts will rock your legs and your lower back. In fact, deadlifts are probably the best lower back exercise ever. As for the middle of the back, pullups hit them a bit, but so do rows and deadlifts a bit, too.

    Posterior deltoids. Um, if you want to isolate, do reverse flies on the chest fly machine. Otherwise, lateral shoulder raises (like you would do for your middle delts) but bending over will hit the rear delts. Oh yeah, pullups work them too

    Traps (cuz they're part of your back): I guess shrugs, but I don't like shrugs. Deadlifts will hit them a bit. Shurgs are probably your best bet though. Just don't go crazy with the shrugs. Huge traps look stupid, especially if they're way bigger in proportion to everything else on your body.

    Iron
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  3. #3
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    What are lateral shoulder raises?

  4. #4
    For traps, what about upright rows.

    You're really pushing those pullups

    Robin
    Surrender yourself to nature and be all that you are.

  5. #5
    Originally posted by Sevan
    What are lateral shoulder raises?
    Flap your arms like a bird...now put dumbells in your hands. Viola! You are now doing lateral raises!

    Try to keep a slight bend in your elbow to reduce stess on the joint...

  6. #6

    Post Delts

    King of post-delt work is the face pull. Stand facing a pull-down machine with a tricep strap. Pull towards your forehead while spreading your hands out.

  7. #7
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    i'll try

    Heyas, thanks for the help, and i'll try em out and then give some feedback.

    Thanks,
    Shane

  8. #8
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    And when doing lateral raises, don't raise your hands higher than your shoulders.

    Iron
    "If you like metal you're my friend" -- Manowar

    "I am the cosmic storms, I am the tiny worms" -- Dimmu Borgir

    <BombScare> i beat the internet
    <BombScare> the end guy is hard.

  9. #9

    Try this

    This is the best way to work your posterior deltoids bro
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhaJbtIT9cM

    Quote Originally Posted by Robinf View Post
    For traps, what about upright rows.
    The upper traps end up getting involved in lateral raises or upright rows, yeah. If you want to hit more of the trap overall (middle and lower fibers) bending over accomplishes this, plus rhomboids.
    Last edited by tyciol; 03-06-2011 at 12:22 PM.

  10. #10
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    I always wondered why you don't raise your hands higher than your shoulders.
    I would believe you would have full range of motion-yes/no?
    Also, try doing lateral raises bent over. Some people rest their head on something.
    It's great for people playing tail on the Lion Dance.
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  11. #11
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    Your chinup/pullup combo would probably be your best bet for back, it runs the gauntlett on your whole back and core. With pullups (palms facing) you do tend to use biceps to "pull" so you won't get the full work of the back. I would sugest going wide grip on the chin up and raise up until the bar touches the back of your neck this causes your shoulder blades to touch almost like your crushing a grape.

    Rear delts; I'll agree with IronFist reverse flys work great. However your still going to get the "crush grape" motion that you would from a chinup, just from a diffrent angle.

    TenTigers

    "I always wondered why you don't raise your hands higher than your shoulders.
    I would believe you would have full range of motion-yes/no?"

    Granted you do get full range of motion, however once you get a few inches above the shoulder line (while the muscle is flexed from the weight) you start to lose the contraction of the muscle. So I think its a matter of getting the most out of the motion and not a safety thing. But then again I could be talking out of my arse. I'm just speculating from my time in the gym and not from acctuall scientific knowledge, just experience.

  12. #12

    a word on traps

    upper, lower and middle traps are all exercised differently, because they all have different lines of pull;

    shoulder shrugs train upper traps; but honestly, don't waste your time: no one has weak upper traps, unless you've had trauma to the nerve supply (to test this, take anyone and have them shrug their shoulders, and then try to press them down - even on someone much smaller / weaker than you, it takes a considerable effort, if you can do it at all);

    middle and especially lower traps are often inhibited / weak on many people, and these muscles are actually very important for scapular stabilization; middle traps are activated with any exercise that requires you to "pinch" your shoulder blades together; lower traps move the inferior angle inferiorly and medially (down and in), and are activated when you lay on your stomach and do shoulder raises straight up (basically shoulder flexion);

    anyway

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by A BIONIC LEG View Post
    Granted you do get full range of motion, however once you get a few inches above the shoulder line (while the muscle is flexed from the weight) you start to lose the contraction of the muscle. So I think its a matter of getting the most out of the motion and not a safety thing. But then again I could be talking out of my arse. I'm just speculating from my time in the gym and not from acctuall scientific knowledge, just experience.
    you "lose" the contraction because at 90˚ you have maximal effect of gravity and once you get above 90˚, you get more and more out of the line until you are at 180˚ (this is the same for front or side raises); so if you lay on your side / stomach and do side / straight arm raises, the maximal resistance from gravity is at the end of the range, not at the middle; of course, towards the end of the range you get to active insufficiency (maximal shortening) and so the muscle isn't as efficient as towards the mid-range;

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    you "lose" the contraction because at 90˚ you have maximal effect of gravity and once you get above 90˚, you get more and more out of the line until you are at 180˚ (this is the same for front or side raises); so if you lay on your side / stomach and do side / straight arm raises, the maximal resistance from gravity is at the end of the range, not at the middle; of course, towards the end of the range you get to active insufficiency (maximal shortening) and so the muscle isn't as efficient as towards the mid-range;
    Awesome, thanks for the info.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by A BIONIC LEG View Post
    Awesome, thanks for the info.
    you're welcome; also, for side raises on your side to have maximal gravity at the end of the range, you would have to do it w the bottom arm, not the top - so if you lie on a weight bench w he bottom arm hanging off the edge, it would be kinda like this pic, except the lower arm would hang all the way off the edge, and would be the one you are lifting, through a 90˚ arc from hanging straight down to level w the bench:


    BTW, I am not advocating you do this, I'm just giving an example of a movement where gravity is maximized at the end of the range; it may not be the best thing to do, especially w shoulders, given that it may increase risk of injury (strain, impingement)

    here is a good example of lower traps doing prone shoulder front raises (fexion) w gravity maximized at end of range:

    this one is fine to do, the risk of injury is much less (of course, unless you have pre-existing pathology); of course, you can do it on a bench, on a ball is harder (although it's good for working core stabe at the same time)
    Last edited by taai gihk yahn; 03-08-2011 at 04:09 AM.

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