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Thread: Wang Baoqiang, Shaolin-trained China A-list movie star

  1. #1
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    Wang Baoqiang, Shaolin-trained China A-list movie star

    I didn't realize he was a Shaolin guy.

    Wang Baoqiang, from screen to political stage
    By Li Jingrong (China.org.cn)
    11:01, January 25, 2013


    Wang Baoqiang was recently elected member of the 11th Hebei Provincial Committee of the CPPCC. (Xinhua)

    28-year-old Wang Baoqiang is a well-known Chinese actor who was recently elected member of the 11th Hebei Provincial Committee of Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC).

    Wang was born on May 29, 1984, in Dahuita Village, Nanhe County, Xingtai City of Hebei Province. He is the youngest of three children. His parents are ordinary farmers. Wang started practicing martial arts at the age of six and became a student of the Shaolin Temple in Henan Province at the age of eight. Later on, he went to Beijing to act as an extra in several martial arts movies.

    For his leading role in the 2003 production "Blind Shaft," Wang won Best Actor at the Fifth Deauville Film Festival in France, Best Actor at the 44th Taiwan Golden Horse Film Festival, and Best Actor at the Second Bangkok International Film Festival.

    In 2004, Wang was invited by famous director Feng Xiaogang to star in "A World Without Thieves" which won him much praise from critics. In 2006, he starred in the TV series "Soldiers Sortie," in which he successively portrayed a soldier named Xu Sanduo. His natural and lovable performance deeply impressed audiences and won him great fame.

    For his 2011 role in "Hello, Mr. Tree," Wang won the award for Best Actor at the Ninth Vladivostok International Film Festival in Russia, the award for Best Actor at the Fifth Asia Pacific Screen Awards, the award for Best Actor at the New York Chinese Film Festival, the award for Best Actor of the 2011-2012 Chinese Youth Film Handbook, and the award for Best Actor at the Italy Asian Film Festival. Wang's 2012 film "Lost in Thailand" was a smash hit at the box-office, taking in 1.1 billion yuan (US$176.8 million). The comedy has unexpectedly become the highest-grossing Chinese film to date.

    Wang is called a "grassroots star" by audiences. His remarkable diligence and painstaking efforts have laid the solid foundation for his success. "My success depends not only on good luck, but also on hard work," he said.
    For reference, see:
    Choy Lay Fut Fist
    Fire of Conscience
    The Iceman Cometh
    Gene Ching
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    Wang Baoqiang ROCKS!

    See him in Kung Fu Jungle. He really shows his stuff, against Donnie Yen no less. He's my new fav Kung Fu action star.
    Gene Ching
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    He will always be Xu Sanduo to me (Soldiers Sortie reference).

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    Running Man

    Running Man is a movie based on a popular reality TV show.
    Gene Ching
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    Wang Baoqiang wants YOU in the PLA

    His film with Donnie Yen, Kung Fu Killer (Jungle) will get a U.S. theatrical release on April 25, 2015.

    PLA tries to woo educated youngsters to join the military
    By Zhang Hui and Guo Yuandan Source:Global Times Published: 2015-3-18 20:38:01



    Military recruiters brandish pamphlets featuring popular local film star Wang Baoqiang at a job fair on February 28 in Xingtai, Hebei Province. Photo: CFP

    Li Wen (pseudonym), an officer in charge of recruitment with a military command in South China, is preparing for the annual round of promotional work that accompanies college graduation season.

    "We need to recruit college students before the graduation season [in June] starts," Li told the Global Times.

    Li will start touring colleges to promote careers in the military next month, and will introduce students to outstanding soldiers who joined the People's Liberation Army (PLA) upon their graduation, he said.

    The yearly push for college students to sign up was shifted from winter to summer and autumn in 2013 to match up with graduation season and to encourage more talented young people to join the military.

    China recruits hundreds of thousands of soldiers every year. Although the government has adopted preferential policies to attract young people to the military, especially college students, it's still difficult for the PLA to enrol enough talented young people.

    Military observers attributed this to an overall decline in national defense awareness among young people and the fact that the military does not seem to offer attractive long-term careers to fresh graduates.

    In need of talented youth

    Li Daguang, a professor at the National Defense University of the PLA, who recently visited some military recruitment offices in Jinan, Shandong Province, told the Global Times that the number of new recruits in Shandong started to decline four or five years ago.

    "Parents used to vie to get their children enlisted, and some even tried to bribe the recruitment officials, but now the opposite is true," Li said.

    Shandong is known as a major contributor of new PLA recruits, with young people from the province usually accounting for one 10th of the new recruits in China every year, according to China National Radio.

    Last year, a district office in Jinan planned to recruit 600 young people, but only 500 had applied by the end of the year. The anxious local officials had to launch another urgent round of recruitment, according to Li.

    "Even if some college students join the army, they would eventually leave for other occupations after their two-year service," Li said.

    The target number of college students that the military authorities recruit annually is decided and adjusted by the State Council and the Central Military Commission, according to the PLA Daily.

    There are no statistics available on the total number of college students who serve in the military every year, but according to Wang Zhigang, a professor with the Academy of Military Sciences of the Chinese PLA, the number of soldiers that have graduated from college only make up 10 to 15 percent of the total soldiers in grass-roots military companies as of 2014, according to China Youth Daily.

    Meanwhile, some young people change their minds about becoming soldiers even after they have gone through the whole rigmarole of registration, health checks and political background checks. Every year in Li Wen's region, around 10 out of the roughly 1,400 young people who are accepted to be soldiers refuse to serve, Li said.

    Nine out of the 400 young people in Wuhan, Hubei Province who signed up to join the PLA in 2011 demanded to leave the military. The Wuhan government punished three people who insisted on leaving, forbidding them from going abroad, finding jobs and applying for colleges for two years, Xinhua reported.

    Not attractive enough

    Song Chao (pseudonym), 30, who was a college student before becoming a soldier in a Hebei-based branch of the military, told the Global Times that he joined the army because it would pay for his student loan.

    "As a village boy from a suburb of Qinhuangdao in Hebei Province, paying off my student loan meant a lot to me at that moment," Song said, adding that he may have had second thoughts about it if his family was better off.

    Since 2009, China has reimbursed new college graduates their tuition fees if they joined the PLA. Two years later, China began funding tuition fees of up to 6,000 yuan per year for college students who suspended their studies to join the military, to encourage more well-educated people to serve in the army, Xinhua reported.

    The military has also tried to bombard young people with more flashy recruitment ads.

    A latest film released by the PLA Air Force for its annual pilot recruitment campaign in February showcased the new J-20 stealth fighter jet, the Y-20 military transport aircraft and the pilots' aerial acrobatics. The film was widely circulated by Chinese netizens after its release.

    But these policies have limited ability to attract young people, according to Li Daguang.

    Xie Xiaobo, the chief of staff at the Guizhou Xingyi military command, told the PLA Daily that many factors contributed to the reduced number of young people joining the military.

    Xie said the key factors in his mind are that the total number of young people has shrunk due to country's family-planning policy, that students prefer going into other fields or continuing their studies, that national defense awareness has weakened and that the preferential treatment given to soldiers is poorly implemented in some places.

    "The most important reason lies in the preferential treatment, especially in the placement for demobilized soldiers," professor Li said.

    China has gradually changed its previous policy under which the military arranged work for demobilized soldiers to a policy in which they offer them financial and training assistance and encourage them to find jobs on their own.

    A 2011 amendment to the Military Service Law asked local governments to give preference to ex-soldiers when they take civil servant examinations and make college applications. Local governments are also required to offer vocational training to ex-soldiers, Xinhua said.

    Even though some regional governments still allocate jobs to ex-soldiers, they are often given jobs in enterprises that are about to go bankrupt, Li said. Also, very few graduates see the military as a viable career in part due to the low likelihood of being promoted up the chain of command, according to Li.

    To counter the problem, Li suggested that the country begin to conscript young people and offer soldiers a greater deal of preferential treatment, to ensure the country has a sufficient number of high-quality soldiers.
    Gene Ching
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    Coming soon

    Gene Ching
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    Divorce

    Poll: 96.8% of Chinese netizens think Wang Baoqiang will come out on top in messy divorce scandal



    Very early Sunday morning, beloved Chinese actor Wang Baoqiang shocked the Chinese internet by announcing on Weibo that he was divorcing his wife, Ma Rong, for carrying out a secret affair with his agent, Song Zhe, that was destroying their family. Wang's post quickly became the hottest topic on Chinese social media, generating millions of shares and comments. Inevitably, the vast majority of those commenters have sided with Wang, calling Ma a "*****," a "prostitute" and a "gold digger." A recent poll shows just how one sided Weibo has become.
    Currently, just over 200,000 Weibo users have answered the simple question: "Wang Baoqiang, Ma Rong, Song Zhe, who will emerge victorious?"
    96.8% have voted in favor of Wang. Incredibly, Ma is even trailing behind Song by around 400 votes at this time. Hey, still 6 days left until the poll closes?



    This is likely isn't the kind of result that Ma Rong was hoping for. She has started to strike back on social media against her husband's accusations, accusing him of abandoning his family and friends on WeChat and making a cryptic post on Weibo that reads: "Trying to hide it only makes it worse, the good and evil of it all will reveal itself in due time." Yesterday, she even sued Wang for defamation of character, demanding that he remove his original Weibo post and apologize. She also posted the court documents on Weibo for Chinese netizens to see.
    But this is an incredibly uphill battle for Ma. Often in affairs, women are cast as the immoral villain, while men get off relatively scot-free. On top of that double standard, Wang Baoqiang is an adored star, not just for his acting, but for his honest demeanor and humility. In his initial Weibo post, he casts himself as a faithful husband and a caring father, who doesn't want to see his family getting mixed up into what is becoming one of the biggest celebrity scandals of the year. Whoops?
    On Monday, Wang officially filed for divorce from Ma. He is demanding full custody of the couple's son and daughter and requested that Ma pay child support until both children are 18 years old. While Ma may be the clear loser in the court of public opinion, we'll have to wait and see what the court of law has to say.



    Still, at least one Weibo user sees a problem with the online poll: "In this kind of case, no one can be called the winner."
    Contact the author of this article or email tips@shanghaiist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
    By Alex Linder in News on Aug 17, 2016 4:40 PM
    Who is Ma? I mean other than Wang's soon-to-be ex?
    Gene Ching
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    More on Wang

    Shoulda kept his Shaolin abstainance vows. Yes, that is sarcasm.

    A Hollywood-style celebrity scandal is dominating the Internet in China


    Wang Baoqiang and Ma Rong
    Chinese actor Wang Baoqiang, right, arrives May 17, 2013, with his wife Ma Rong for a screening of the film "Tian Zhu Ding" (A Touch of Sin) at the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France. (Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)
    Jonathan Kaiman

    China is in the midst of one of its biggest celebrity scandals in recent memory, a messy divorce which, over the last week, has dominated the country’s Internet and turned ordinary social media fans into avid sleuths.

    Actor Wang Baoqiang on Sunday posted via Weibo, China’s Twitter, that his wife of seven years, Ma Rong, an actress, was engaged in an affair with his agent, Song Zhe. On Monday, Wang filed for divorce.

    Since then, the scandal has become the biggest topic in Chinese cyberspace. The hashtag #WangBaoqiangDivorce on Weibo had been viewed 8.6 billion times as of late Friday afternoon — on average, more than six times for every one of China’s more than 1.3 billion people. Chinese Internet users have overwhelmingly rallied to the actor’s defense, with many even donating money to help cover his legal fees.

    "Since I married Ma Rong in 2009, I’ve kept my wedding vows; I’ve been sincere to her and loyal to my marriage,” Wang wrote in his original Weibo post, which has attracted 5.3 million “likes” and 3 million comments. “I protect my wife and take care of my children and all of our parents; I make efforts to be a good husband, dad and son. I work hard to provide a better living environment for my family.

    “I’ve been absolutely loyal, honest and tolerant,” he continued. “But I can’t stand the evil behavior of betraying a marriage and destroying one’s family.”

    Soon afterward, Ma struck back, claiming that Wang was the guilty party. “The more one tries to hide, the more one is exposed,” she posted cryptically. “The truth will finally come out.”

    On Monday, Wang’s company wrote on Weibo that Wang had borrowed money to fund his divorce case, sparking speculation in the Chinese media that Ma and Song had absconded with his wealth. Internet users struck out at Ma, posting a string of vitriolic comments to her Weibo page. Some users even tracked down her address and ID card number and posted them online.

    “Wang Baoqiang is a village boy — he suffered a lot,” said one fan’s Weibo post, reflecting a popular sentiment. “All your money was made by him. Please don’t take away his hard-earned money.”

    On Tuesday, Ma sued Wang for defamation. On Wednesday, Song’s wife filed for divorce.

    Wang, 32, was born to a poor family in Hebei, a dusty, mountainous province that surrounds Beijing. His debut role was as a 16-year-old victim of two scam artists in Blind Shaft, a bleak film about murder in a Chinese coal mine. He hit the mainstream soon afterward, playing charming, if naive characters in several comic capers, including A World Without Thieves (2004) and Lost in Thailand (2012), for a time China’s highest grossing movie ever.

    Chinese media have referred to Wang as a “grassroots star,” and his down-home appeal might partly explain the overwhelming sympathy.

    Yet some observers have seen it as a symptom of unfair gender relations in the country.

    “It’s a double standard,” Lü Pin, the editor in chief at Gender Watch, a feminist activist website, told the Chinese news website Phoenix News. “Society is particularly intolerant towards women cheating on their husbands. We always find a reason, or an excuse, for men cheating. More often we’ll forgive men, and give [them] a second chance.”

    Chinese Internet users and media have attempted to eke out as much information on the case as possible. The Legal Evening News, a state-run newspaper, published information about the couple’s assets (they found nine properties, a BMW car and other “luxury goods”).

    An anonymous airline company employee even publicized Ma and Song’s flight information to help amateur sleuths track them down. According to Chinese media, one Beijing resident flew overnight to the northeastern city of Dalian to try to find Song. (He failed).

    Many Internet users have helped donate money to abet Wang’s divorce — enough that swindlers have piggybacked on the scandal for financial gain. Some have composed text messages in Wang’s name to solicit donations, according to an article in the Henan Legal Evening News. One victim, a villager, reportedly transferred 5,000 yuan ($750) to a swindler’s account.

    On Wednesday, the scandal in full swing, several U.S.-based fans located Wang’s Pasadena house on a real estate app, traveled to the residence, and interviewed a neighbor about who lived there.

    They didn’t find much. According to a reporter for the website SinoVisionNet, the neighbor told them that two people live in the house, a man and a woman. The neighbor didn’t recognize a photo of Wang.

    The video of the neighbor also went viral. As of late Friday, it had been viewed at least 6 million times.

    Yingzhi Yang in the Times’ Beijing bureau contributed to this report.
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    ttt 4 2017!

    Sino Celeb: Wang Baoqiang
    By Tristin Zhang, January 10, 2017



    Sino Celeb is a monthly feature where we introduce a Chinese celebrity to to our readers.

    Of all Chinese movie stars on the big screen, Wang Baoqiang is most like the Cinderella of Middle Kingdom show business. An inspirational example for the hundreds of millions born into China’s working class, Wang, who was raised in an underprivileged village in Hebei, rose to stardom against the odds.

    As a small child, he was first inspired to take up acting after watching Jet Li’s hit film Shaolin Temple. At the age of eight, Wang was recruited as a member of the renowned kung fu hub Shaolin Shi, where he spent six years practicing martial arts.

    Wang came to Beijing when he turned 20, playing extras in small budget films and TV series until he was chosen to take part in Blind Shaft – a film that won him a Golden Horse award but is now banned in China. Before long, he was acting in prominent hits like Chinese director Feng Xiaogang’s A World Without Thieves and the popular 2010 comedy Lost on Journey.

    In August, Wang elicited newfound attention when he announced on Weibo that he would be divorcing his wife, with whom he had a daughter and son. The cause – an affair between the man’s beloved and his agent – aroused heated discussion across the country and won the humble actor plenty of sympathy from fans.

    Kind of like: Zach Galifianakis of The Hangover (only fitter and with less facial hair).
    Famous for: Blind Shaft, rising to stardom from a poor village in Hebei and (most notably) his recent divorce.
    See him next in: the film Detective Chinatown 2.
    Zach Galifianakis? WTH?
    Gene Ching
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    Interesting that Wang Baoqiang's character is named Wu Kong

    Maybe this needs to be added to our Monkey King thread now.

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    Wang Baoqiang, Shaolin-trained China A-list movie star

    Gene Ching
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    Wang Baoqiang, Shaolin-trained China A-list movie star

    Gene Ching
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    my kung fu borther wang bao qiang

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    Detective Chinatown 3

    Gene Ching
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    Wang Baoqiang, Shaolin-trained China A-list movie star

    Gene Ching
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