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Thread: AI Responses to Common Kung Fu questions.

  1. #1

    AI Responses to Common Kung Fu questions.

    I've been playing with ChatGPT and thought it'd be fun to ask it some questions about Chinese Martial Arts. Below are some of the questions with answers.

    Link: https://chat.openai.com/chat
    Last edited by MightyB; 01-26-2023 at 08:06 AM.

  2. #2
    Q: "explain the history of northern seven star praying mantis kung fu"

    OpenAI: "Northern Seven Star Praying Mantis Kung Fu is a martial art that originated in northern China. It is believed to have originated in the late 1700s or early 1800s and is said to have been created by Wang Lang, a martial artist from the Shandong province. It is based on the movements of the praying mantis, an insect known for its quick and powerful strikes. The style is known for its fast, powerful strikes and emphasis on close-range combat. It also incorporates techniques from other martial arts, such as Xing Yi and Baji. The style has a strong reputation in China and has been passed down through generations of practitioners. It is still widely taught and practiced today."

  3. #3
    Q: "why do Chinese martial arts seem ineffective today?"

    OpenAI: "Chinese martial arts, like any other martial arts, can be effective if taught and practiced properly. However, there are several reasons why some people may believe that Chinese martial arts are ineffective today.

    One reason is that many Chinese martial arts have been heavily modified and diluted over time, often to make them more appealing to a wider audience. This can lead to a loss of their original effectiveness.

    Another reason is that Chinese martial arts are often taught and practiced in a traditional, ritualistic way, which may not be as effective in real-world self-defense situations as more modern, practical approaches.

    Additionally, the martial arts scene today is heavily influenced by MMA and other sports-based martial arts, these are based on different set of rules and training methodologies, which can lead to a perception that traditional martial arts are not as effective.

    It's worth noting that Chinese martial arts have a long history and many styles, so it's not fair to make a generalization that all of them are ineffective. It's also important to remember that martial arts are not just about physical fighting, but also about discipline, self-improvement, and tradition."

  4. #4
    Q: "which style of Chinese martial arts would be the most effective in MMA?"

    OpenAI: "There are several styles of Chinese martial arts that have been adapted and used in mixed martial arts (MMA) competitions, such as Sanda (also known as Sanshou), which is a sport-based martial art developed by the Chinese military. Sanda incorporates techniques from traditional Chinese martial arts, such as striking, wrestling, and grappling, and allows for the use of more full-force strikes and throws.

    Another style that has been used in MMA is Shuai Jiao, which is a Chinese wrestling style that also incorporates throws, joint locks, and strikes.

    Wing Chun, a southern Chinese martial art known for its close-range combat and efficient use of energy, has also been used in MMA by some fighters. Wing Chun's focus on using angles and redirecting force can be effective in MMA.

    Also, Chinese Kung Fu styles like Xing Yi, Ba Gua, and Tai Chi have been adapted by some fighters and trainers for use in MMA. These styles are known for their focus on internal energy and body mechanics, which can help to improve a fighter's power, balance, and overall conditioning.

    It's worth noting that in MMA, fighters often train in multiple styles and techniques, and adapt them to their own fighting style, so the most effective style in MMA will depend on the fighter's personal preferences and skills."

  5. #5
    Q: "explain the history of Sanda"

    OpenAI: "Sanda (also known as Sanshou) is a sport-based martial art that originated in China. It was developed by the Chinese military in the 1950s as a way to train soldiers in hand-to-hand combat. The art was created by combining techniques from various traditional Chinese martial arts, such as Kung Fu, Wu Shu, and Chin Na, with modern sport training methods.

    The name "Sanda" literally means "free fighting" and refers to the fact that the art includes both striking and grappling techniques, as well as throws and take downs.

    Sanda was first officially introduced as a competitive sport in the Chinese National Games in the 1980s and has since grown in popularity both in China and internationally.

    Sanda is known for its fast-paced, full-contact nature and its emphasis on practical, real-world self-defense applications. It is also known for its use of a variety of strikes, kicks, throws, and takedowns, along with the use of weapons such as the spear and sword.

    Sanda has been included in the program of the World Wushu Championships, and in 2002 it was included in the program of the Asian Games.

    Sanda is widely practiced in China and also in other countries by Chinese martial arts enthusiasts and students, as well as by individuals interested in sport-based martial arts and full-contact fighting.

    The sport is governed by the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which is responsible for organizing international competitions and promoting the sport around the world. Sanda is a separate discipline from Wushu Taolu, which is a more traditional, performance-based form of martial arts."

  6. #6
    Q: "How can traditional Chinese martial arts schools attract new students in a market saturated by MMA?"

    OpenAI: "There are several strategies that traditional Chinese martial arts schools can use to attract new students in a market saturated by MMA:

    1. Emphasize the self-defense aspect: Many people are interested in learning martial arts for self-defense, so highlighting the practical self-defense applications of traditional Chinese martial arts can be an effective way to attract new students.
    2. Highlight the health and fitness benefits: Traditional Chinese martial arts can provide a full-body workout and can be beneficial for overall health and fitness. Emphasizing these benefits can attract people who are looking for a new workout routine.
    3. Offer a variety of classes: Offering a variety of classes, such as beginner, intermediate, and advanced classes, can attract students at different skill levels.
    4. Use social media and online marketing: Utilizing social media and online marketing strategies to promote the school and its classes can help to reach a wider audience and attract new students.
    5. Offer a trial class or a free class for potential students to try the traditional Chinese martial arts style before committing to a long-term membership.
    6. Participate in community events, such as martial arts demonstrations, and cultural events to showcase the traditional Chinese martial arts style, and promote the school.
    7. Highlight the cultural and historical aspects of traditional Chinese martial arts, this can attract students interested in learning more about the culture and history of China, and how it's related to the martial arts.
    8. Emphasize the importance of traditional training methods and discipline, this can attract students who are looking for a more traditional and authentic martial arts experience."

  7. #7
    Q: "What are some examples of effective social media posts that Chinese martial arts instructors can implement to attract new students?"

    OpenAI: "Here are some examples of effective social media posts that Chinese martial arts instructors can implement to attract new students:

    1. Showcase student success stories: Share posts about students who have improved their health and fitness, gained self-confidence, or achieved a new belt level. These posts can help to demonstrate the benefits of training in traditional Chinese martial arts.
    2. Share training tips and techniques: Share instructional videos or posts that demonstrate specific techniques or training methods. This can be a great way to showcase the instructor's expertise and attract potential students.
    3. Promote upcoming events or seminars: Share information about upcoming events or seminars, such as belt testings or guest instructor workshops, to attract potential students who are interested in learning more about traditional Chinese martial arts.
    4. Share photos and videos from class: Share photos and videos from class to give potential students a sense of what training in traditional Chinese martial arts is like.
    5. Share cultural and historical information about traditional Chinese martial arts: Share posts about the history and culture of traditional Chinese martial arts to attract students who are interested in learning more about the culture and history of China.
    6. Share testimonials from current students: Share testimonials from current students, who can speak about their experiences and benefits of training in traditional Chinese martial arts.
    7. Offer special promotions or discounts: Share information about special promotions or discounts for new students, this can be a great way to attract new students and encourage them to try traditional Chinese martial arts.
    8. Share a post about the benefits of the traditional training methods and the discipline that the traditional Chinese martial arts school enforces, this can attract students."

  8. #8
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    Ask a harder question...

    Impressive. Most impressive. Obi-Wan has taught you well.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #9
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    Bot writers

    2 minute read February 14, 20236:54 AM PST Last Updated 22 days ago
    From state media to a Shaolin temple, Baidu's ChatGPT-style bot sees partner rush

    Reuters
    People walk near a Baidu logo at the company headquarters in Beijing, China April 23, 2021. REUTERS/Florence Lo
    BEIJING, Feb 14 (Reuters) - Chinese organisations, from state media to a Shaolin temple, said on Tuesday they have signed partnerships with Baidu's ChatGPT-style project, ahead of an expected launch next month.

    The Chinese search engine giant (9888.HK) last week announced that it would complete internal testing of its “Ernie Bot" in March. It is a large artificial intelligence (AI) powered language model that seeks to rival Microsoft-backed OpenAI’s hit chatbot.

    China's Shaolin Temple, the cradle of Chinese kung fu, said in a statement it would work with Baidu to integrate Ernie into its operations with the purpose of creating an AI-driven content environment.

    Over a dozen Chinese media outlets also said they had entered tie-ups with Baidu, including the state-owned Shanghai Securities Journal. The journal said that it would use the chatbot to increase its competitiveness and lead an "upgrade" in the financial media industry.

    Baidu's banking joint venture with CITIC (601998.SS), as well as its electric vehicle arm Jidu Auto, also said on Tuesday they would integrate Ernie into their operations.

    A Baidu spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    The stream of announcements highlights the growing enthusiasm for generative AI in China, after ChatGPT became the fastest-growing consumer application in history, raising awareness in China about how advanced the U.S.’ AI efforts are.

    Many other Chinese tech companies, big and small, have said they are working on their own ChatGPT products, including Alibaba Group (9988.HK) and JD.com (9618.HK).


    Reporting by Eduardo Baptista in Beijing; Editing by Brenda Goh and Sharon Singleton
    As an aside, I got three submissions a few weeks ago that I am convinced were bot-written. They were flat - like a wiki submission - and they were submitted by dubious emails. I replied to the first one thinking it was a real human. It was a soft rejection with suggestions on how it might be improved to be publishable through us, but outright rejected the next two. No response from any of them. Usually my rejections are open ended and rejected contributors will reply with an acknowledgement. Sometimes they come back with something publishable.


    AI-Responses-to-Common-Kung-Fu-questions
    Buddhist-robot
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As an aside, I got three submissions a few weeks ago that I am convinced were bot-written. They were flat - like a wiki submission - and they were submitted by dubious emails. I replied to the first one thinking it was a real human. It was a soft rejection with suggestions on how it might be improved to be publishable through us, but outright rejected the next two. No response from any of them. Usually my rejections are open ended and rejected contributors will reply with an acknowledgement. Sometimes they come back with something publishable.


    AI-Responses-to-Common-Kung-Fu-questions
    Buddhist-robot
    At least we know that even bots find value in KFM

  11. #11
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    Oh man... I just got another...

    This one is titled 'The Choy Li Fut-CopyAI'. Like they aren't even trying to hide...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As an aside, I got three submissions a few weeks ago that I am convinced were bot-written. They were flat - like a wiki submission - and they were submitted by dubious emails. I replied to the first one thinking it was a real human. It was a soft rejection with suggestions on how it might be improved to be publishable through us, but outright rejected the next two. No response from any of them. Usually my rejections are open ended and rejected contributors will reply with an acknowledgement. Sometimes they come back with something publishable.
    There definitely is a tonal quality in how it writes. I've also noticed that it will use a ton of commas in strange places. Luckily, researchers are finding ways to detect AI written content.
    https://www.npr.org/2023/01/09/11475...ian-plagiarism

    On a side note, has martialartsmart considered doing topic anthologies with the previously published magazine content (similar to the old Shaolin Specials) that could be reprinted as books? You have a nice backlog of content that's currently sold out.

  13. #13
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    Nice NPR piece, MightyB. Thanks.

    Regarding reprints, we were in production of what would've been our final issue but it ended abruptly with the shelter in place order (along with our print mag and my full-time job here). I've been aspiring to finish that issue - a lot of it is done - but it's been difficult because our production team has moved on and there's only one graphic artist left. We don't have the time. I'm still hopeful however. I'm toying with some similar reprint plans... we shall see...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Regarding reprints, we were in production of what would've been our final issue but it ended abruptly with the shelter in place order (along with our print mag and my full-time job here). I've been aspiring to finish that issue - a lot of it is done - but it's been difficult because our production team has moved on and there's only one graphic artist left. We don't have the time. I'm still hopeful however. I'm toying with some similar reprint plans... we shall see...
    I hope you get the chance to finish the final issue *. I'm not sure how well they'd sell, but it's a shame to let all of that archived knowledge go to waste; I've seen other defunct martial arts magazines use their old articles to put together topic specific books.

    *ChatGPT could help you finish writing it

  15. #15
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    Well played...

    Quote Originally Posted by MightyB View Post
    *ChatGPT could help you finish writing it
    Ouch.

    Way to pour salt in the wound, bruh.

    We'd discussed doing the final issue as a Kickstarter. However right now, all attention is focused upon TCEC 2023.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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