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Thread: Judo

  1. #136
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    ttt 4 2017

    All Japan Judo Federation drops requirement that women’s black belts have white stripe
    Casey Baseel 18 hours ago



    Policy shift aligns Japan with international standard.

    Just as a judo match involves two competitors, there are two governing bodies for the sport. The International Judo Federation, based in Switzerland, is the controlling body for competitions in the global judo community, while Japan’s All Japan Judo Federation holds dominion over all things judo in the martial art’s native nation.

    The two organizations each lay out their own sets of rules on how contests are to be carried out and decided, with even uniform regulations for judoka (judo practitioners) differing between the two. In 1999, for example, the International Judo Federation put an end to the practice of female judoka having to wear black belts with a white stripe running lengthwise along the fabric, as opposed to the pure-black belts used by male competitors, on the grounds that the discrepancy was discriminatory.

    However, the All Japan Judo Federation decided to stick with the established norm and continued with the use of the white-striped black belt, which can be seen in the above photo.

    On March 13, though, the All Japan Judo Federation’s board of directors announced that it would be abolishing the use of the white-striped belts, and that once the change goes into effect, male and female judoka alike will be using the entirely black belts.

    No official reason has been given for the organization’s change in stance. A likely explanation, though, is the continued success of the Japanese women’s Olympic judo team, whose medal count since the 1992 Games (when women’s judo became a medal event) currently sits at 32, two better than the 30 medals claimed by Japanese male judoka in that time frame. Women’s athletics and athletes have also been receiving increasingly prominent media coverage in Japan since the turn of the millennium, and in light of such developments, it seems the All Japan Judo Federation took a moment to reexamine why it had two sets of uniform regulations, and decided that the discrepancy was a relic of a bygone era.

    Source: Yahoo! News Japan/Asahi Shimbun Digital via Hachima Kiko
    Images: All Japan Judo Federation
    I didn't even know this was a thing and Judo was my first martial art. Plus MAM sells solid black belts, belts with white stripes, and belts with colored stripes.
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  2. #137
    Great. Based on the photo. Now it will be hard to tell who is a man and who is a women. Liberals defeated the Kodokan. Holy-----.

  3. #138
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    They look like Sumotori (Sumo wrestlers) to me. Especially the one on the lower right. I suppose the extra weight makes for a lower center of gravity and thus more difficulty in throwing them.

  4. #139
    It is bulls---. The Kodokan is a private dojo. They can decide what is allowed and what is not. But I guess they gave in. Just sh-t. Its not a huge deal but what is next ?

    PRIVATE means you ain't allowed or you don't get to bring your bull**** inside. Want to be a member ? Here the rules, regulations and policy book. Don't like it . There is the door. Or better yet. You pay all the expenses and we will bend some things for you. That works too. Yeah, you don't want to pay anything. Just demand.

  5. #140
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    Good that Israel took 5 medals

    So tacky. If you're going to host an international games, you can't do this sort of thing.

    UAE Apologizes to Israeli Judo Team, But Is it Too Little, Too Late?
    By JNS October 30, 2017 , 9:30 am
    “I constantly spread out My hands To a disloyal people, Who walk the way that is not good, Following their own designs.” Isaiah 65:2 (The Israel Bible™)


    From left to right, Israeli judo official Moshe Ponte, International Judo Federation President Marius Vizer and UAE judo officials meet on Oct. 28 in Abu Dhabi. (International Judo Federation via Twitter)
    By: Adam Abrams/JNS.org

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) officially apologized to Israel on Saturday following a handshake snub during last week’s Abu Dhabi Grand Slam judo tournament. The Arab country did not, however, apologize for the tournament’s ban on Israeli symbols.

    In what the International Judo Federation (IJF) referred to as a “historic meeting” on the tournament’s final day, Mohammad Bin Thaloub Al-Darei, president of the UAE’s Judo Federation, along with senior UAE sports official Aref Al-Awani, formally apologized to Israeli Judo Association leader Moshe Ponte “because of the UAE athletes not shaking hands” with Israel’s competitors and congratulated the Israeli team on its success.

    According to the IJF, Ponte “thanked his UAE counterpart for the hospitality that was shown” to Israel’s team in Abu Dhabi.

    The Arab apology followed an incident in which UAE athlete Rashad Almashjari refused to shake the hand of Israeli athlete Tohar Butbul’s after losing to him in the tournament’s first round. Butbul went on to win a bronze medal in the men’s lightweight category.


    Ori Sasson being snubbed by Egyptian Judoka after Olympic match (YouTube)

    The snub mirrored an incident that occurred during the Rio Olympics in 2016, when Egyptian judoka Islam El Shehaby was booed by spectators for refusing to shake the hand of Israeli judoka Ori Sasson, after losing to Sasson in the first round of the men’s over-100 kilograms competition.

    Ahead of the Abu Dhabi tournament, organizers banned Israel’s team from donning national symbols and playing the Jewish state’s national anthem, “Hatikvah.” The 12 Israeli athletes competing in Abu Dhabi were also forbidden from including the letters “ISR” on their uniforms to identify their nationality.

    “This is not the first time that Israeli teams playing in Gulf have been uniquely forced to give up their national symbols and anthems,” Prof. Joshua Teitelbaum, a senior research fellow at Bar-Ilan University’s Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, told JNS.org. “This apology by the UAE is too little and too late. It was an apology for not shaking hands, but not for snubbing Israel by not allowing Israeli flags and ‘Hatikvah.’”

    Defying the Arab slights, the Israeli athletes took home a total of five medals.

    Israeli team member Tal Flicker won a gold medal in the under-66 kilograms category last Thursday. During the medal ceremony, Flicker sang Hatikvah to himself as the IJF flag and anthem played in the background.

    “Israel is my country, and I’m proud to be Israeli,” Flicker told reporters. “The anthem that they played of the world federation was just background noise. I was singing Hatikvah from my heart.”


    Israeli judoka Tal Flicker in Abu Dhabi. (Twitter)

    “I’m glad we’re here, with or without the flag. As far as we’re concerned, what’s important is having [Israeli] athletes compete on such levels and proving to everyone that there’s no stopping Israel,” said the coach of Israel’s team, Oren Smadja.

    Teitelbaum said, “I’m sure Abu Dhabi pays a lot of money to the International Judo Federation, which apparently did not have a strong enough backbone to insist on sportsmanship in sports. It is up to the various international sports federations that there be no discrimination by the host nation. If a nation discriminates, it should be barred from hosting future competitions.”

    The UAE “plays a double game” by publicly insulting Israeli athletes, yet maintaining “extensive business and defense relations with Israel, according to foreign sources, but all under the table,” he said.

    The Arab nation’s behavior “is kind of a ‘cover’ for its well-developed relations with the Jewish state,” added Teitelbaum.

    Leading up to the tournament, Israel’s Minister of Culture and Sport Miri Regev wrote a letter in mid-October to the president of the International Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach, protesting the Arab demand for the Israeli team to appear without national symbols.

    “It is the obligation of any country which has the privilege of hosting an international competition to allow the competing athletes to represent the country honorably while ensuring their security,” she wrote.

    During the Grand Slam competition hosted in Abu Dhabi in 2015, Israeli judo competitors accepted similar conditions to participate, wearing uniforms in the colors of the International Judo Federation rather than the Israeli flag or anything suggesting their nationality.
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  6. #141
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    martial arts & world diplomacy

    WORLD NEWS AUGUST 7, 2019 / 5:33 PM / UPDATED 11 HOURS AGO
    Judo helps Japan get to grips with China's expansion in Pacific
    Jonathan Barrett
    4 MIN READ

    APIA, Samoa (Reuters) - In a large church hall near the Samoan parliament, 175-kg (386-lb) judo practitioner Derek Sua is being thrown to the mat by his Japanese coach, a black-belt who is just a third his size.

    Sua welcomes the training, usually difficult for athletes in Pacific Ocean islands to secure, but now offered free by Japan’s development assistance agency, to help him qualify for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

    “It’s not easy, because here in the Pacific for us, especially Pacific islanders, we have limited competition,” Sua said. “Because we need to find funding to travel overseas and compete.”

    Sua added that he would train in Japan in August with several other Samoans, following an invitation he described as fostering goodwill between the two nations.

    But the offer is also part of a wider diplomatic effort in the Pacific by the United States and its allies, including Japan, to counter the growing influence of China, which has ramped up its sports programs in the region.

    Sometimes called “soft” or “cultural” diplomacy, such programs can extend beyond sports to language exchanges and the arts, with the aim of advancing foreign policy goals.


    FILE PHOTO: Samoan judoka Derek Sua attends a practice session with his Japanese coach Kohei Kamibayashi at a training facility inside a church hall in Apia, Samoa, July 13, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Barrett

    Although tiny, the Pacific islands control vast swaths of resource-rich ocean and strategic infrastructure, such as airstrips and ports, provoking interest from China and a counter response from the United States.

    Last week, Samoan sports minister Loau Keneti Sio said China had extended an invitation to train a “large contingent” of young athletes in sports, from athletics to badminton and volleyball, later this year.

    China had already hosted Samoan athletes ahead of the Olympic-styled Pacific Games, held in Samoa in July, while training chefs and performers for the opening and closing ceremonies, he added.

    China has soft power initiatives elsewhere in the Pacific, which include exposing regional table tennis players to the country’s world-class coaches and training regimes.

    The judo diplomacy complements similar initiatives from regional allies Australia and New Zealand, which actively use rugby union and league to forge strong ties with Pacific islands, where the football codes are dominant.

    Originating in Japan, judo makes use of grip fighting and throws that have proved to be effective techniques for mixed martial art competitions.

    On the mats in Samoa, Sua’s coach, Kohei Kamibayashi, said judo was a sport whose most powerful practitioners did not always win the battle.

    The Japanese coach said his star Samoan pupil, who competed at the last Olympics in Brazil, must prepare to face bigger opponents in his 100-kg (221-lb) -plus category, where there are no weight limits.

    Kamibayashi said he was helping Sua perfect his use of a technique called “seoi-nage”, effective for throwing bigger opponents.

    While Samoans were naturally built for a sport like judo, it was a very demanding martial art that was still struggling to win converts on the island, Sua added.

    “It can be another dominant sport here in Samoa if a lot of people get interested,” he said.

    Reporting by Jonathan Barrett in APIA, Samoa; Editing by Clarence Fernandez
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  7. #142
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    I hate it when politics interferes with athletics...

    ...but such is part of the intrinsic drama of international games...

    NINE MONTHS BEFORE TOKYO OLYMPICS
    Iran barred indefinitely from world judo over refusal to face Israelis
    Official suspension handed down by International Judo Federation comes after Iranian judoka said he was ordered to throw match to avoid facing Israeli competitor
    By AFP and TOI STAFF
    22 October 2019, 7:14 pm 3


    Iran's judoka Saeid Mollaei reacts after losing to Belgium's Matthias Casse in the semifinal fight in the men's under-81 kilogram category during the 2019 Judo World Championships in Tokyo on August 28, 2019. (Charly Triballeau/AFP)

    The International Judo Federation (IJF) said Tuesday it had banned Iran from competition indefinitely over the country’s refusal to face Israeli competitors.
    The federation issued a provisional ban last month while investigating a report that Iran had ordered a judoka to lose deliberately at the world championships to avoid facing Israeli competitor Sagi Muki in the subsequent round.

    “Following the events, which occurred during the last World Judo Championships Tokyo 2019, the final suspension of the Iran Judo Federation from all competitions… has been pronounced,” the IJF said in a statement.

    The IJF said the suspension will remain in place until the Iran Judo Federation “gives strong guarantees and proves that they will respect the IJF Statutes and accept that their athletes fight against Israeli athletes.”

    Iranian fighter Saeid Mollaei, defending his title at the Tokyo World Championships in August, had said he was ordered to throw his semifinal rather than risk facing an Israeli in the final of the under 81kg class.

    The Iranian, 27, lost the semifinal and then went on to lose his third-place fight.


    In this photo taken Sept. 12, 2019, Iranian judoka Saeid Mollaei poses for a portrait photo at an undisclosed southern city of Germany. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    Mollaei said he had been instructed to withdraw from the competition by the presidents of the Iran Judo Federation and the Iran Olympic committee.

    Rejecting the charges, the Iranian federation denied that pressure had been applied to force Mollaei to withdraw from the championships.

    However the IJF disciplinary commission examining the case found that Iran’s actions “constitute a serious breach and gross violation of the Statutes of the IJF, its legitimate interests, its principles and objectives.”

    Judo is one of Iran’s sporting strong points and the ban comes as a blow just nine months ahead of the Tokyo Olympics.

    Tehran is expected to appeal against the IJF decision at the Swiss-based Court for Arbitration of Sport. They have 21 days to do so.

    Meanwhile, Culture Minister Miri Regev lauded the IJF’s ban, but said in a statement that she regretted “the heavy price Iranian athletes will have to pay because of their regime’s decisions.”

    The IJF said Mollaei had been pressured to lose by Iranian deputy sports minister Davar Zani. Mollaei was also reportedly pressured to bow out by Iranian Olympic Committee president Reza Salehi Amiri, who told him minutes before his semifinal match that Iranian security services were at his parents’ house in Tehran.


    Belgium’s Matthias Casse (in blue) celebrates winning the semifinal fight against Iran’s Saeid Mollaei in the men’s under-81 kilogram category during the 2019 Judo World Championships in Tokyo on August 28, 2019. (Charly Triballeau/AFP)

    The IJF said an official from the Iranian embassy in Tokyo pretending to be a coach gained access to a restricted area to coerce the 27-year-old Tehran native to lose the match as he warmed up on the sidelines.

    Mollaei fled to Berlin after the championships, where he was hoping to secure a place at the 2020 Olympic games.

    Iran does not recognize Israel as a country, and Iranian sports teams have for several decades had a policy of not competing against Israelis. Iranian passports remind holders in bold red they are “not entitled to travel to occupied Palestine.”

    One of the most famous cases was that of Arash Miresmaeili, a two-time judo world champion who showed up overweight for his bout against an Israeli at the Olympics in Athens in 2004 and was disqualified.

    He was praised by Iran’s then-president Mohammad Khatami and the ultraconservative media and eventually made his way to become the current chief of Iran’s judo federation’s chief.

    Miresmaeili told Iranian media at the time he would refuse to fight an Israeli as a gesture of support for Palestine.

    According to him, the current ban on the federation is “outside the usual procedure” as the disciplinary committee reviewing the case should have temporarily suspended Iran until reviews were complete and Iran had time to present its defense.


    Sagi Muki of Israel, top, competes against Matthias Casse of Belgium during a men’s under-81 kilogram final of the World Judo Championships in Tokyo, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
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  8. #143
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    Yosh Uchida Sensei

    I earned my BS at SJSU but never trained with their Judo team (I was on the SJSU fencing team). However, I did work for Uchida Sensei as a driver for Laboratory Services, which was a medical sample testing lab. I met with him a few times under that capacity, but not much. The longest meeting was my entrance interview. He liked that Judo had been my first martial art and invited me to train with the team, but respected that I was already dedicated to fencing. He struck me as very cordial, a true gentleman, and a decent boss.

    Uchida Legacy Gala

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    March 21, 2020

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    Reception 6pm
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  9. #144
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    RIP Kano Yukimitsu

    Grandson of the Founder of Judo passed away
    By Nicolas Messner on 09. Mar 2020

    It is with deep sorrow we inform you that Honorary President of the Kodokan Judo Institute and All Japan Judo Federation (AJJF), KANO Yukimitsu, passed away on 8th March 2020 at a hospital in Tokyo due to pneumonia. He was 87. Kano Yukimitsu was much more than his titles; he was the grandson of Kano Jigoro, the founder of judo.



    Who does not know that name, Kano, especially in the judo world? Without Master Jigoro Kano, the sport simply would not exist. In 1882 he created judo, when he was only 22 years old. 135 years later, judo became a major Olympic sport and Paralympic sport and an educational tool for the youth of the world. While constantly evolving, it has remained committed to the values that Kano has defined.

    During the summer of 2017, the International Judo Federation had the privilege of meeting Kano Yukimitsu. In that exclusive interview he recalled memories of his grandfather and explained his own vision of judo, as Mr. Kano Yukimitsu has also played an important role in judo in Japan as well as in the rest of the world.

    Mr. Kano explained that when he said in front of his grandfather that he wanted to find a role model and become like that person later, the founder of judo replied: “You should not try to be like somebody else. You are who you are.“ This is a perfect illustration of how judo can help to build better citizens, to grow a better society. Kano Jigoro was not only teaching the theory, he made sure all could understand the fundamentals and he wanted his students to put his teachings into practice in society.



    The whole judo family and the IJF express their deepest condolences to Mr. Kano's family, relatives and friends, to the Kodokan Institute and to the All Japan Judo Federation. Only Mr. Kano's close relatives and Kodokan employees will attend his funeral services with KANO Akashi, his eldest daughter, serving as the chief mourner. Later, a joint funeral will be held by the Kodokan and AJJF. Words of condolence should be addressed to intl@kodokan.org (Kodokan Judo Institute).

    Kano Yukimitsu profil

    April 1980 – March 2009: Fourth President of Kodokan, Second President of AJJF

    September 1980 – October 1995: President of Judo Union of Asia

    April 2009 -: Honorary President of Kodokan and AJJF
    Condolences to all judoka. Judo was my first martial art and I still hold its lessons in high regard.
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  10. #145
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    score another for judo

    CRIME
    International judo competitor uses martial arts to disarm suspect in Kansas City

    BY ANNA SPOERRE
    OCTOBER 27, 2020 01:04 PM, UPDATED OCTOBER 27, 2020 02:01 PM

    Do you know what to do if you accidentally dial 911? Do you know what information is crucial in an emergency? Here's what you need to know to get the police, fire or ambulance service you need fast. BY MARK HOFFER

    A Kansas City man used his professional martial arts training to disarm a man attempting to rob him Monday night, police said.

    Josh Henges, of Kansas City, was walking home Monday evening when he felt someone grab his shoulder and press a gun against his back, according to a news release from the Kansas City Police Department.

    Henges used to be a member of the USA Judo team. He told police he was heading back from a convenience store around 8:15 p.m. in the 4100 block of Warwick Boulevard when a 20-year-old man came up behind him.

    As Henges turned around, the young man held the gun up to Henges’ forehead and told him to hand over his possessions, according to the news release.

    The judo competitor and Brazilian jiu-jitsu instructor then grabbed the suspect’s shoulder and disarmed him.

    “Henges said he was able to use his training to take the suspect to the ground and restrain him,” the release read.

    He called 911 while holding the attempted robber down.

    “He was in grabbing range of me,” Henges told police, according to the release. “You don’t have to hurt him. You just hold him in place, and there’s no permanent injury.”

    Officers arriving at the scene found the young man pinned beneath Henges. The suspect was taken into custody.

    Police later said the weapon was a BB gun. They are expecting charges to be filed soon, according to the Tuesday afternoon release.

    “Henges said he has compassion for the suspect and hope he gets the help he needs,” the release read.
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